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Profile: Christopher Clarke (University of Southampton)
Profile: Christopher Clarke (Cambridge University, Bristol University)
  1. Christopher J. S. Clarke (2007). The Role of Quantum Physics in the Theory of Subjective Consciousness. Mind and Matter 5 (1):45-81.
    I argue that a dual-aspect theory of consciousness, associated with a particular class of quantum states, can provide a consistent account of consciousness. I illustrate this with the use of coherent states as this class. The proposal meets Chalmers 'requirements of allowing a structural correspondence between consciousness and its physical correlate. It provides a means for consciousness to have an effect on the world (it is not an epiphenomenon, and can thus be selected by evolution) in a way that supplements (...)
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  2. Anthony P. Atkinson, I. S. Baker, Susan J. Blackmore, William Braud, Jean E. Burns, R. H. S. Carpenter, Christopher J. S. Clarke, Ralph D. Ellis, David Fontana, Christopher C. French, D. Radin, M. Schlitz, Stefan Schmidt & Max Velmans (2005). Open Peer Commentary on 'the Sense of Being Stared At' Parts 1 &. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (6):50-116.
  3. Christopher J. S. Clarke (2005). The Sense of Being Stared At: Its Relevance to the Physics of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (6):78-82.
  4. Christopher J. S. Clarke (2001). Consciousness and Non-Hierarchical Physics. In P. Loockvane (ed.), The Physical Nature of Consciousness. John Benjamins. 29--191.
    An example is presented of a model of consciousness based on a description of the world which integrates the material and psychological aspects from the start. An indication is given of work under way to test the model.
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  5. Christopher J. S. Clarke (1995). The Nonlocality of Mind. Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (3):231-40.
    The dominance in normal awareness of visual percepts, which are linked to space, obscures the fact that most thoughts are non-spatial. It is argued that the mind is intrinsically non-spatial, though in perception can become compresent with spatial things derived from outside the mind. The assumption that the brain is entirely spatial is also challenged, on the grounds that there is a perfectly good place for the non-spatial in physics. A quantum logic approach to physics, which takes non-locality as its (...)
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  6. C. M. H. Nunn, Christopher J. S. Clarke & B. H. Blott (1994). Collapse of a Quantum Field May Affect Brain Function. Journal of Consciousness Studies 1 (1):127-39.
    Experiments are described, using electroencephalography (EEG) and simple tests of performance, which support the hypothesis that collapse of a quantum field is of importance to the functioning of the brain. The theoretical basis of our experiments is derived from Penrose (1989) who suggested that conscious decision-making is a manifestation of the outcome of quantum computation in the brain involving collapse of some relevant wave function. He also proposed that collapse of any wave function depends on a gravitational criterion. As different (...)
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