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  1. Christopher Michaelson, Michael G. Pratt, Adam M. Grant & Craig P. Dunn (2014). Meaningful Work: Connecting Business Ethics and Organization Studies. Journal of Business Ethics 121 (1):77-90.
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  2. Katherina Glac & Christopher Michaelson (2012). What is a Good Answer to an Ethical Question? Journal of Business Ethics Education 9:233-258.
    Instructors of business ethics now have a wealth of cases and other pedagogical material to draw on to contribute to achieving ethics learning goals now required at most business schools. However, standard ethics case pedagogy seems to provide more guidance regarding the form and process for getting to a good answer than on the ethical content of the answer itself. Indeed, instructors often withhold their own judgments on what is a good answer so as not to indoctrinate students with the (...)
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  3. Christopher Michaelson (2012). Cantor Fitzgerald and September 11. Journal of Business Ethics Education 9:411-419.
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  4. Christopher Michaelson (2012). Reading Leaders' Minds: In Search of the Canon of 21st Century Global Capitalism. [REVIEW] Asian Journal of Business Ethics 1 (1):47-61.
    This paper explores the values and practices of capitalism and speculates about how they might evolve as twenty-first century global capitalism comes into being. The values embodied by the Westernized canon we have inherited might account for certain shortcomings of capitalism. As economic power shifts away from dominant markets of the recent past, our search for the canon of twenty-first century global capitalism can help shape the values we aspire for our capitalism of the future to embody and to enable.
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  5. Christopher Michaelson (2011). Morally Differentiating Responsibility for Climate Change Mitigation. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 30 (1-2):113-136.
    The ethical tension over whether countries have differentiated responsibilities for climate change mitigation evokes the tale of a master and a man. The one who thinks she is the master is analogous to the wealthier, industrialized nations and their market actors, and the human is the rest of humanity, particularly those citizens of less developed countries. Since 1992, there has been formal, stated agreement that there should be differentiated responsibilities for climate change mitigation between developed and developing nations, but differentiation (...)
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  6. Christopher Michaelson (2010). Business and/as/of the Humanities. Journal of Business Ethics Education 7:201-212.
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  7. Christopher Michaelson (2010). Revisiting the Global Business Ethics Question. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):237-251.
    A fundamental question of global business ethics is, “When moral business conduct standards conflict across borders, whose standards should prevail?” Western scholarship and practice tends to depict home country standards as “higher” or more “restrictive”or “well-ordered” than the “lower” standards of emerging market actors. As much as the question appears culturally neutral, many who ask it do so with a culturally-specific lens shaped by prevailing conditions of Western economic strength. However, the dominanteconomic powers of the future are not likely to (...)
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  8. Christopher Michaelson (2009). Meaningful Work and Moral Worth. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 28 (1/4):27-48.
    In general, meaningful work has been conceived to be a matter of institutional obligation and individual choice. In other words, solong as the institution has fulfilled its objective moral obligation to make meaningful work possible, it is up to the subjective volition of the individual to choose or not to choose work that is perceived to be meaningful. However, this conception is incomplete in at least two ways. First, it neglects the role of institutional volition; that is, it does not (...)
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  9. Christopher Michaelson (2009). Teaching Meaningful Work. Journal of Business Ethics Education 6:43-67.
    Meaningful work is an important but under-represented topic in the business ethics and management curriculum. One definition of meaningful work is that it enables self-realization and service to others while fitting what the market demands. This paper provides an outline for thinking about meaningful work by exploring the evolution of and conclusions from a teaching exercise on meaningful work.
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  10. Christopher Michaelson (2008). Moral Luck and Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):773 - 787.
    Moral luck – which seems to appear when circumstances beyond a person’s control influence our moral attributions of praise and blame – is troubling in that modern moral theory has supposed morality to be immune to luck. In business, moral luck commonly influences our moral judgments, many of which have economic consequences that cannot be reversed. The possibility that the chance intervention of luck could influence the way in which we assign moral accountability in business ethics is unsettling. This paper (...)
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  11. Christopher Michaelson (2008). Work and the Most Terrible Life. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):335 - 345.
    Tolstoy’s Iván Ilých lies near death, regretting a terrible life but unaware of what he could have done differently while alive. Although motivated to work for all the wrong reasons–money, self-esteem, social acceptance, and escape from home–by all formal accounts he has been a highly responsible professional. This analysis of a work about work illustrates the relationship between meaningful work, professional responsibility, and meaningful life.
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  12. Jeffery D. Smith, Denis G. Arnold, Mitchell R. Haney, Nien-hê Hsieh, Alexei Marcoux, Christopher Michaelson, Geoff Moore, Jeffrey Moriarty, Jeffery Smith & Ben Wempe (2008). Normative Theory and Business Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  13. Christopher Michaelson (2006). Compliance and the Illusion of Ethical Progress. Journal of Business Ethics 66 (2-3):241 - 251.
    It has become common for business practitioners and management scholars to distinguish between compliance and ethics. According to the conventional distinction as expressed in Paine’s formulation of Integrity Strategy, compliance is ordinarily a necessary but insufficient condition for ethics. Now that this distinction has been institutionalized in the most significant judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in American business conduct management since the Enron failure, it is worth asking whether the current emphasis on ethics represents progress. Does it make logical and (...)
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  14. Christopher Michaelson (2006). Just Work. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (1):110-110.
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  15. Christopher Michaelson (2005). Dealing with Swindlers and Devils: Literature and Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 58 (4):359 - 373.
    Part of the value of stories is moral, in that understanding them, and the characters within them, is one way in which we seek to make moral sense of life. Arguably, it has become quite common to use stories in order to make moral sense of business life. Case method is the standard teaching method in top business schools, and so-called “war stories” are customary for on-the-job training. Shakespeare is a trendy purveyor of leadership education. Several books and articles have (...)
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  16. Christopher Michaelson (2005). 'I Want Your Shower Time!': Drowning in Work and the Erosion of Life. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 24 (4):7-26.
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  17. Christopher Michaelson (2004). Business and Ethics After September 11. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 23 (1/2):259-300.
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  18. Christopher Michaelson (2001). Is Business Ethics Philosophy or Sophism? Business Ethics 10 (4):331–339.
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  19. Christopher Miles Michaelson (2001). Philosophy Out of the Cave. In Laura Duhan Kaplan (ed.), Philosophy and Everyday Life. Seven Bridges Press.
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