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  1. Christopher Moore (2015). Socrates and Self-Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, the first systematic study of Socrates's reflections on self-knowledge, Christopher Moore examines the ancient precept 'Know yourself' and, drawing on Plato, Aristophanes, Xenophon, and others, reconstructs and reassesses the arguments about self-examination, personal ideals, and moral maturity at the heart of the Socratic project. What has been thought to be a purely epistemological or metaphysical inquiry turns out to be deeply ethical, intellectual, and social. Knowing yourself is more than attending to your beliefs, discerning the structure of (...)
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  2. Christopher Moore (2014). Arguing for the Immortality of the Soul in the Palinode of the Phaedrus. Philosophy and Rhetoric 47 (2):179-208.
    Socrates’ second speech in the Phaedrus includes the argument (245c6–246a2) that starts “all/every soul is immortal” (“ψυχὴ πᾶσα ἀθάνατος”).1 This argument has attracted attention for its austerity and placement in Socrates’ grand speech about chariots and love. Yet it has never been identified as a deliberately fallacious argument.2 This article argues that it is. Socrates intends to confront his interlocutor Phaedrus with a dubious sequence of reasoning. He does so to show his speech-loving friend how—rather than simply to tell him (...)
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  3. Christopher Moore (2014). How to 'Know Thyself' in Plato's Phaedrus. Apeiron 47 (3):390-418.
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  4. Christopher Moore (2014). Pindar's Charioteer in Plato's Phaedrus (227b9–10). Classical Quarterly 64 (2):525-532.
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  5. Christopher Moore (2013). Deception and Knowledge in the Phaedrus. Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):97-110.
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  6. Christopher Moore (2013). Prudes, Perverts, and Tyrants. Plato's Gorgias and the Politics of Shame. By Christina H. Tarnopolsky. Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):202-209.
  7. Christopher Moore (2012). Clitophon and Socrates in the Platonic Clitophon. Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):257-278.
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  8. Christopher Moore (2012). The Myth of Theuth in the Phaedrus. In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill
  9. Christopher Moore (2011). Socratic Persuasion in the Crito. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (6):1021 - 1046.
    Socrates does not use the Laws' Speech in the Crito principally to persuade Crito to accept his coming execution. It is used instead to persuade Crito to examine and work on his inadequate view of justice. Crito's view of justice fails to coordinate one's duties to friends and those to the law. The Laws' Speech accomplishes this persuasive goal by accompanying Crito?s earlier speech. Both start from the same view of justice, one that Crito accepts, but reach opposing conclusions. Crito (...)
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  10. Christopher Moore (2010). Theories of Retailing. In Michael John Baker & Michael Saren (eds.), Marketing Theory: A Student Text. Sage 345.
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  11. Christopher I. Moore & Mriganka Sur (1997). Cortical Plasticity and LTP. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):623-624.
    In the developing and adult cortex, just as in the adult hippocampus, LTP is unable to account for a variety of types of functional plasticity.
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