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  1. Christopher Ormell (2006). The Continuum: Russell’s Moment of Candour. Philosophy 81 (4):659-668.
    A quotation from Russell concedes that the immensity of real numbers implied by the usual account of the continuum cannot mainly consist of ‘those whose digits procede according to some rule’. Russell concludes that the main body of real numbers ‘must be’ of the ‘lawless’ variety. The author scrutinises these so-called ‘lawless decimals’ and concludes that they are mythical. It follows that the totality of well-defined real numbers cannot be more than a countable whole. It is however clearly uncountable. An (...)
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  2. Christopher Ormell (1994). A Modern Cogito 6: Mathematics and Science Viewed on a Human Scale. Cogito 8 (2):166-174.
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  3. Christopher Ormell (1994). A Modern Cogito. Cogito 8 (1):59-65.
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  4. Christopher Ormell (1993). A Modern Cogito 4: Random Versus Perverse-Random. Cogito 7 (3):216-225.
    The first paper of this series (Cogito, 1992) outlined ‘the showdown phenomenon’: a live sequence of events of two distinct kinds, ‘red’ and ‘green’, which was experienced by the would-be predictor as absolutely and irreducibly unpredictable, because the predictor invariably got his or her predictions wrong. We can clearly and distinctly imagine this happening: so a perverse-random experience of this sort is evidently ‘logically possible’. This raises the question of the relation of the new sequences to ordinary ‘random’ sequences. In (...)
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  5. Christopher Ormell (1993). A Modern Cogito 3: Unpredictability and the Other. Cogito 7 (2):140-145.
    In the first paper of this series (Cogito, 1992) the author outlined ‘the showdown phenomenon’: a live sequence of events of two distinct kinds, ‘red’ and ‘green’, which was experienced by the would-be predictor as absolutely and irreducibly unpredictable, because the predictor invariably got his or her predictions wrong. (In a second paper (Cogito, 1993) he argued that the showdown phenomenon is an epistemological landmark, because it establishes a clearly conceptualized, tangible, localized ‘limit of knowledge’.) At the end of the (...)
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  6. Christopher Ormell (1993). A Modern Cogito 2: Recognizing the Limits of Predictive Knowledge. Cogito 7 (1):50-58.
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  7. Christopher Ormell (1993). Is the Uncertainty of Mathematics the Real Source of its Intellectual Charm? Journal of Philosophy of Education 27 (1):125–133.
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  8. Christopher Ormell (1993). Values Versus Values. Journal of Moral Education 22 (1):31-45.
    This paper argues that an explicit distinction should be made between two senses in which we can say, as a retrospective judgement, that an individual “had the values of generosity, universal friendship and humour” . It is argued that there was previously an established, selective, “hard” sense of “having values” which has been all but overrun in modem times by a “universal”, “soft”, relativistic sense of the same phrase. In the former sense, a person only qualifies for “having the value (...)
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  9. Christopher Ormell (1992). Marx's Deficient Promise. Philosophy 67 (262):552 - 558.
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