Search results for 'Christopher S. Gifford' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Christopher S. Gifford (2013). Against the Modal Argument. Erkenntnis 78 (3):627-646.score: 1140.0
    The relationship between alethic modality and indeterminacy is yet to be clarified. A modal argument—an argument that appeals to alethic modality—against vague objects given by Joseph Moore offers a potential clarification of the relationship; it is proposed that there are cases for which the following holds: if it is indeterminate whether A = B then it is possible that it is determinate that A = B. However, the argument faces three problems. The problems remove the argument’s threat against vague objects (...)
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  2. Fred Gifford (2000). Freedman's 'Clinical Equipoise' and Sliding-Scale All-Dimensions-Considered Equipoise'. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (4):399 – 426.score: 420.0
    It is often claimed that a clinical investigator may ethically participate (e.g., enroll patients) in a trial only if she is in equipoise (if she has no way to ground a preference for one arm of the study). But this is a serious problem, for as data accumulate, it can be expected that there will be a discernible trend favoring one of the treatments prior to the point where we achieve the trial's objective. In this paper, I critically evaluate Benjamin (...)
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  3. Fred Gifford (1986). Sober's Use of Unanimity in the Units of Selection Problem. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:473 - 482.score: 360.0
    Sober argues that the units of selection problem in evolutionary biology is to be understood and solved by applying the general analysis of what it means for C to cause E in a population. The account he utilizes is the unanimity account, according to which C causes E in a population when C raises the probability of E in each causal context. I argue that he does not succeed here, both because the unanimity account is not well grounded in the (...)
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  4. Paul Gifford (2011). Review of T.P. Wiseman's New Men in the Roman State. [REVIEW] Constellations 2 (2):154-156.score: 360.0
    In this work, Wiseman sets out to examine the role of the novus homo in the Roman Senate. Rather than attempt to deal with the earlier period of the Republic, an era for which we have little evidence of most senatorial Romans--let alone new men. Wiseman takes as his starting point the passage of the lex Gabinia in 139 BC. 1 This law imposed a secret ballot, meaning magisterial candidates were no longer bound so tightly to the patronage of the (...)
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  5. Todd S. Macfarlan, Wesley D. Gifford, Shawn Driscoll, Karen Lettieri, Helen M. Rowe, Dario Bonanomi, Amy Firth, Oded Singer, Didier Trono & Samuel L. Pfaff (2012). Embryonic Stem Cell Potency Fluctuates with Endogenous Retrovirus Activity. In Jeffrey Kastner (ed.), Nature. Mit Press. 57-63.score: 280.0
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  6. R. B. Braithwaite (1929). Professor Eddington's Gifford Lectures. Mind 38 (152):409-435.score: 140.0
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  7. Peter Heath (1975). Professor Ayer's Gifford Lectures. Inquiry 18 (2):225 – 229.score: 140.0
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  8. C. D. Broad (1921). Prof. Alexander's Gifford Lectures. Mind 30 (117):25-39.score: 140.0
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  9. Basil Mitchell (1961). Professor Campbell's Gifford Lectures. [REVIEW] Philosophy 36 (137):227 - 230.score: 140.0
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  10. C. A. Campbell (1962). Blanshard's Gifford Lectures. [REVIEW] Philosophy 37 (141):263 - 268.score: 140.0
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  11. Leonard Russell (1929). The Nature of the Physical World. By A. S. Eddington M.A., LL.D., D.Sc., F.R.S., Gifford Lectures, 1927. (Cambridge University Press. 1928. Pp. Xix + 361. Price 12s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 4 (14):252-.score: 140.0
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  12. Victor Lowe (1970). Whitehead's Gifford Lectures. Southern Journal of Philosophy 7 (4):329-338.score: 140.0
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  13. C. D. Broad (1921). Prof. Alexander's Gifford Lectures (II.). Mind 30 (118):129-150.score: 140.0
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  14. C. D. Broad (1921). Prof. Alexander's Gifford Lectures(I.). Mind 30 (117):129-150.score: 140.0
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  15. C. A. Campbell (1962). Review: Blanshard's Gifford Lectures. [REVIEW] Philosophy 37 (141):263 - 268.score: 140.0
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  16. Sterling P. Lamprecht (1931). Morality and Religion: A Critique of Professor A. E. Taylor's Gifford Lectures. International Journal of Ethics 41 (4):493-506.score: 140.0
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  17. Basil Mitchell (1961). Review: Professor Campbell's Gifford Lectures. [REVIEW] Philosophy 36 (137):227 - 230.score: 140.0
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  18. D. G. Ritchie (1900). Nature and Mind: Some Notes on Professor Ward's Gifford Lectures. Philosophical Review 9 (3):241-267.score: 140.0
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  19. Kevin Sharpe & Leslie Van Gelder (forthcoming). Human Uniqueness and Upper Paleolithic" Art": An Archaeologist's Reaction to Wentzel van Huyssteen's" Gifford Lectures". American Journal of Theology and Philosophy.score: 140.0
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  20. Leslie A. Muray, Kevin Sharpe Leslie van Gelder, Wesley J. Wildman, Nancy R. Howell, Karl E. Peters, Walter B. Gulick & J. van Huyssteen (2007). A Conversation on J. Wentzel van Huyssteen's Gifford Lectures. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 28 (3):299-432.score: 140.0
     
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  21. Kevin Sharpe & Leslie Van Gelder (2007). Human Uniqueness and Upper Paleolithic "Art": An Archaeologist's Reaction to Wentzel van Huyssteen's "Gifford Lectures". American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 28 (3):311 - 345.score: 140.0
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  22. Michael J. Rulon (1997). Donald MacKay's Final Lectures—the Gifford Lectures. Philosophical Psychology 10 (4):517 – 521.score: 126.0
    Delivered only months before his death, the Gifford Lectures allowed Donald MacKay to clarify and to emphasize his views on many important issues. MacKay stressed the primacy of personal experience and the differences between persons, brains, and machines. These positions are reviewed here, as are some of the reasons why MacKay may remain relatively unknown among American psychologists, philosophers, and neuroscientists.
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  23. Mark Gifford (1999). Aristotle on Platonic Recollection and the Paradox of Knowing Universals: Prior Analytics B.21 67a8-30. Phronesis 44 (1):1-29.score: 120.0
    The paper provides close commentary on an important but generally neglected passage in _Prior Analytics B.21 where, in the course of solving a logical puzzle concerning our knowledge of universal statements, Aristotle offers his only explicit treatment of the Platonic doctrine of 'recollection'. I show how Aristotle defends his solution to the "Paradox of Knowing Universals", as we might call it, and why he introduces recollection into his discussion of the puzzle. The reading I develop undermines the traditional view of (...)
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  24. Matthew B. Gifford (2013). Skepticism and Elegance: Problems for the Abductivist Reply to Cartesian Skepticism. Philosophical Studies 164 (3):685-704.score: 120.0
    Some philosophers argue that we are justified in rejecting skepticism because it is explanatorily inferior to more commonsense hypotheses about the world. Focusing on the work of Jonathan Vogel, I show that this “abductivist” or “inference to the best explanation” response rests on an impoverished explanatory framework which ignores the explanatory gap between an object's having certain properties and its appearing to have those properties. Once this gap is appreciated, I argue, the abductivist strategy is defeated.
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  25. Fred Gifford (2007). Pulling the Plug on Clinical Equipoise: A Critique of Miller and Weijer. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (3):203-226.score: 120.0
    : As clinicians, researchers, bioethicists, and members of society, we face a number of moral dilemmas concerning randomized clinical trials. How we manage the starting and stopping of such trials—how we conceptualize what evidence is sufficient for these decisions—has implications for both our obligations to trial participants and for the nature and security of the resultant medical knowledge. One view of how this is to be done, "clinical equipoise," recently has been given an extended defense by Paul Miller and Charles (...)
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  26. Mark Gifford (1999). Aristotle on Platonic Recollection and the Paradox of Knowing Universals: Prior Analytics B.21 67a8-30. Phronesis 44 (1):1-29.score: 120.0
    The paper provides close commentary on an important but generally neglected passage in "Prior Analytics" B.21 where, in the course of solving a logical puzzle concerning our knowledge of universal statements, Aristotle offers his only explicit treatment of the Platonic doctrine of Recollection. I show how Aristotle defends his solution to the "Paradox of Knowing Universals", as we might call it, and why he introduces Recollection into his discussion of the puzzle. The reading I develop undermines the traditional view of (...)
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  27. A. D. Ritchie (1931). Process and Reality. By A. N. Whitehead Sc.D., LL.D., F.R.S., Fellow of Trinity College in the University of Cambridge and Professor of Philosophy in Harvard University (Gifford Lectures Delivered in the University of Edinburgh During the Session 1927–1928). (Cambridge, at the University Press. 1929. Pp. Xxiii + 509. Price 18s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 6 (21):102-.score: 120.0
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  28. Fred Gifford (2007). So-Called "Clinical Equipoise" and the Argument From Design. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (2):135 – 150.score: 120.0
    In this article, I review and expand upon arguments showing that Freedman's so-called "clinical equipoise" criterion cannot serve as an appropriate guide and justification for the moral legitimacy of carrying out randomized clinical trials. At the same time, I try to explain why this approach has been given so much credence despite compelling arguments against it, including the fact that Freedman's original discussion framed the issues in a misleading way, making certain things invisible: Clinical equipoise is conflated with community equipoise, (...)
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  29. Fred Gifford (1986). The Conflict Between Randomized Clinical Trials and the Therapeutic Obligation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 11 (4):347-366.score: 120.0
    The central dilemma concerning randomized clinical trials (RCTs) arises out of some simple facts about causal methodology (RCTs are the best way to generate the reliable causal knowledge necessary for optimally-informed action) and a prima facie plausible principle concerning how physicians should treat their patients (always do what it is most reasonable to believe will be best for the patient). A number of arguments related to this in the literature are considered. Attempts to avoid the dilemma fail. Appeals to informed (...)
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  30. E. R. Dodds (1929). Dean Inge on Plotinus (1) The Philosophy of Ptotinus (the Gifford Lectures at St. Andrews, 1917–1918). By William Ralph Inge, C.V.O., D.D., Dean of St. Paul's. Two Vols. Pp. Xx + 270 and Xii + 254. London, New York, and Toronto: Longmans, Green and Co., 1929. 21s. (2) Plotinus (the Annual Lecture on a Master Mind, Henrietta Hertz Trust of the British Academy, 1929). Pp. 27. London: Milford, 1929. 1s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (04):140-141.score: 120.0
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  31. L. J. Russell (1929). The Sciences and Philosophy. Gifford Lectures, University of Glasgow, 1927 and 1928. By J. S. Haldane C.H., M.D., F.R.S. (London: Hodder and Stoughton, Ltd. 1929. Pp. Ix + 344. Price 15s. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 4 (16):558-.score: 120.0
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  32. Paul Gifford & Peter McBurney (1988). The Ethical Concerns of Contemporary Zimbabwean Managers: A Preliminary Sounding. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 7 (5):363 - 372.score: 120.0
    An MBA course has recently been introduced in the Department of Business Studies at the University of Zimbabwe. Applications for the course are numerous, so selection can be very rigorous. Thus the students admitted to the course comprise many of the country's most promising junior managers. As an assignment for a course on business ethics, the students were asked to discuss an ethical problem they had met in the course of business. An analysis of the problems discussed is quite revealing. (...)
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  33. F. B. Jevons (1908). Adam's 'Religious Teachers of Greece.' The Religious Teachers of Greece, Being Gifford Lectures on Natural Religion Delivered at Aberdeen. By James Adam, Litt.D., Edited with a Memoir by His Wife, Adela Marion Adam. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1908. 8vo. Xix + Lv + 467. A Photograph of James Adam. 10s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 22 (08):252-254.score: 120.0
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  34. H. F. Stewart (1904). Gifford's Eusebius Eusebii Pamphili Evangelicae Praeparationis. Libr. XV. Ad Codices Manuscriptos Denuo Collatos Recensuit Anglice Nunc Primum Reddidit Notis Et Indicibus Instruxit E. H. Gifford, S.T.P. Oxford Univ. Press, 1903. £5 5s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 18 (06):323-325.score: 120.0
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  35. Ralph E. Stedman (1933). Scientific Theory and Religion. By E. W. Barnes, Sc.D., D.D., LL.D., F.R.S. (The Gifford Lectures at Aberdeen, 1927–1929.) (London: Cambridge University Press, 1933. Pp. Xxiv + 685. Price 25s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 8 (32):475-.score: 120.0
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  36. Warren S. Brown (1997). Mac Kay's View of Conscious Agents in Dialogue: Speculations on the Embodiment of Soul. Philosophical Psychology 10 (4):497 – 505.score: 60.0
    Donald MacKay's description of the embodiment of an efficacious conscious mind is reviewed as a version of non-reductive physicalism. Particular focus is given to MacKay's analysis of the emergence of consciousness in the capacity for self-evaluation which results from informational feedback regarding the results of action. Unique to MacKay's posthumously published Gifford Lectures is his analysis of agents in dialog as a particular form of an environmental feedback loop. His analysis of dialog is reviewed and expanded to encompass (...)
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  37. Henry Samuel Levinson (2004). Let Us Be Saints If We Can": A Reflection on Stanley Hauerwas's "With the Grain of the Universe. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (1):219 - 234.score: 58.0
    Stanley Hauerwas's Gifford Lectures are, at least in part, an interpretation of the Giffords that came before him. As a contribution to intellectual and theological history, however, I wish Hauerwas had given witness to Santayana's Hermes the hermeneut, along with the considerable, indeed considerate, witness he does give to his own Christian faith. Hauerwas seems to dislike Reinhold Niebuhr and, by my account, misreads William James. Thus I have to conclude that "With the Grain of the Universe" does not (...)
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  38. William James (1902/2002). The Varieties of Religious Experience: A Study in Human Nature: Being the Gifford Lectures on Natural Religion Delivered at Edinburgh in 1901-1902. Dover Publications.score: 54.0
    After completing his monumental work, The Principles of Psychology, William James turned his attention to serious consideration of such important religious and philosophical questions as the nature and existence of God, immortality of the soul, and free will and determinism. His interest in these questions found expression in various works, including The Varieties of Religious Experience, his classic study of spirituality. Based on the prestigious Gifford Lectures on Natural Religion he gave at the University of Edinburgh in 1901 and (...)
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  39. Paul B. Miller & Charles Weijer (2007). Revisiting Equipoise: A Response to Gifford. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (3):227-246.score: 54.0
    : The authors respond to objections Fred Gifford has raised against their paper "Rehabilitating Equipoise." They situate this exchange in the wider context of recent debate over equipoise, highlighting substantial points of agreement between themselves and Gifford. The authors offer a brief restatement of "Rehabilitating Equipoise" in which they amplify some of its core arguments. They then assess Gifford's objections. Finding each to be unfounded, they argue that there is no justification for "pulling the plug" on clinical (...)
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  40. Kelly C. Smith (1992). The New Problem of Genetics: A Response to Gifford. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 7 (3):331-348.score: 54.0
    Recently, Fred Gifford attempted to explicate the meaning of the term genetic as applied to phenotypic traits. He takes as his primary goal the explication of how the term is used and tries to avoid conclusions about how it should be used. He proposes two independent criteria (DF and PI) which together capture much of what biologists mean when they describe traits as genetic. Although Gifford's approach is extremely insightful in many ways, I argue that his analysis is (...)
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  41. Freeman J. Dyson (1988/2004). Infinite in All Directions: Gifford Lectures Given at Aberdeen, Scotland, April-November 1985. Perennial.score: 54.0
    Infinite in All Directions is a popularized science at its best. In Dyson's view, science and religion are two windows through which we can look out at the world around us. The book is a revised version of a series of the Gifford Lectures under the title "In Praise of Diversity" given at Aberdeen, Scotland. They allowed Dyson the license to express everything in the universe, which he divided into two parts in polished prose: focusing on the diversity of (...)
     
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  42. Bernard E. Jones (2011). Earnest Enquirers After Truth: A Gifford Anthology: Excerpts From Gifford Lectures 1888-1968. Routledge.score: 54.0
    First published in 1970, Bernard E. Jones’s selection of Gifford lectures includes excerpts from the writings of over ninety scholars who occupied a Gifford Chair between 1888 and 1968. Lord Gifford had asked his lecturers to be ‘honest to God’, insisting that they should be ‘earnest enquirers after truth’ and had always envisaged the lectures being published. Dr Jones’s anthology is arranged under headings suggested by phrases from Lord Gifford’s will. The selection, which includes names such (...)
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  43. Eric Steinhart (2013). Royce's Model of the Absolute. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (3):356-384.score: 42.0
    At the end of the 19th century, Josiah Royce participated in what has come to be called the great debate (Royce, 1897; Armour, 2005).1 The great debate concerned issues in metaphysical theology, and, since metaphysics was primarily idealistic, it dealt considerably with the relations between the divine Self and lesser selves. After the great debate, Royce developed his idealism in his Gifford Lectures (1898-1900). These were published as The World and the Individual. At the end of the first volume, (...)
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  44. Peter Van Inwagen (2006). The Problem of Evil: The Gifford Lectures Delivered in the University of St. Andrews in 2003. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    The vast amount of suffering in the world is often held as a particularly powerful reason to deny that God exists. Now, one of the world's most distinguished philosophers of religion presents his own position on the problem of evil. Highly accessible and sensitively argued, Peter van Inwagen's book argues that such reasoning does not hold: his conclusion is not that God exists, but that suffering cannot be shown to prove that He does not.
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  45. Lewis S. Ford (1994). Prozess, Gefühl Und Raum-Zeit. Materialien Zu Whiteheads 'Prozess Und Realität' Band 1. Die Gifford Lectures Und Ihre Deutung. Materialien Zu Whiteheads 'Prozess Und Realität' Band 2. [REVIEW] Process Studies 23 (3-4):197-198.score: 36.0
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  46. Gifford A. Grobien (2011). What is the Natural Law? : Medieval Foundations and Luther's Approbation. In Robert C. Baker & Roland Cap Ehlke (eds.), Natural Law: A Lutheran Reappraisal. Concordia Pub. House.score: 36.0
     
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  47. Peter Van Inwagen (2006). The Problem of Evil: The Gifford Lectures Delivered in the University of St. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    The vast amount of suffering in the world is often held as a particularly powerful reason to deny that God exists. Now, one of the world's most distinguished philosophers of religion presents his own position on the problem of evil. Highly accessible and sensitively argued, Peter van Inwagen's book argues that such reasoning does not hold: his conclusion is not that God exists, but that suffering cannot be shown to prove that He does not.
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  48. Nancy R. Howell (2008). Uniqueness in Context. Zygon 43 (2):493-503.score: 28.0
    Wentzel van Huyssteen's Gifford Lectures, published as Alone in the World? Human Uniqueness in Science and Theology, accomplish critical and constructive thinking about interdisciplinary reflection on science and religion and about the meaning of human uniqueness. One approach to discussion of van Huyssteen's text entails consideration of three issues: the contextual character of research on humans and animals, the difficult problem of defining uniqueness, and the important consequences of exploring human uniqueness. Evolutionary biology and primatology contribute specific scientific insights.
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  49. John Dewey (1929/1960). The Quest for Certainty: A Study of the Relation of Knowledge and Action. New York, Putnam.score: 28.0
    John Dewey's Gifford Lectures, given at Edinburgh in 1929.
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  50. John Dewey (1930). The Quest for Certainty. London, G. Allen & Unwin Ltd..score: 28.0
    John Dewey's Gifford Lectures, given at Edinburgh in 1929.
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