12 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Christopher Stephens (University of British Columbia)
  1. Christopher Lee Stephens (2011). A Bayesian Approach to Absent Evidence Reasoning. Informal Logic 31 (1).
    Normal 0 0 1 85 487 UBC 4 1 598 11.773 0 0 0 Under what conditions is the failure to have evidence that p evidence that p is false? Absent evidence reasoning is common in many sciences, including astronomy, archeology, biology and medicine. An often-repeated epistemological motto is that “the absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.” Analysis of absent evidence reasoning usually takes place in a deductive or frequentist hypothesis-testing framework. Instead, I develop a Bayesian analysis of (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Christopher Stephens (2010). Forces and Causes in Evolutionary Theory. Philosophy of Science 77 (5):716-727.
  3. Mohan Matthen & Christopher Stephens (eds.) (2007). Philosophy of Biology. Elsevier.
    This collection of 25 essays by leading researchers provides an overview of the state of the field.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Christopher Stephens (2005). What Can Evolutionary Theory Teach Us About Human Nature? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 36 (1):221-232.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Christopher Stephens (2005). Strong Reciprocity and the Comparative Method. Analyse and Kritik 27 (1):97-105.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Christopher Stephens (2004). Selection, Drift, and the “Forces” of Evolution. Philosophy of Science 71 (4):550-570.
    Recently, several philosophers have challenged the view that evolutionary theory is usefully understood by way of an analogy with Newtonian mechanics. Instead, they argue that evolutionary theory is merely a statistical theory. According to this alternate approach, natural selection and random genetic drift are not even causes, much less forces. I argue that, properly understood, the Newtonian analogy is unproblematic and illuminating. I defend the view that selection and drift are causes in part by attending to a pair of important (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Christopher Stephens & Mohan Matthen (eds.) (2004). Elsevier Handbook in Philosophy of Biology. Elsevier.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Christopher L. Stephens (2001). When is It Selectively Advantageous to Have True Beliefs? Sandwiching the Better Safe Than Sorry Argument. Philosophical Studies 105 (2):161-189.
    Several philosophers have argued that natural selection will favor reliable belief formation; others have been more skeptical. These traditional approaches to the evolution of rationality have been either too sketchy or else have assumed that phenotypic plasticity can be equated with having a mind. Here I develop a new model to explore the functional utility of belief and desire formation mechanisms, and defend the claim that natural selection favors reliable inference methods in a broad, but not universal, range of circumstances.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Christopher L. Stephens, Janine Jones & What Could Turn Out (2001). Mary Kate Mcgowan/Privileging Properties 1–23 Crawford L. Elder/the Problem of Harmonizing Laws 25–41 Gary Ebbs/is Skepticism About Self-Knowledge Coherent? 43–58 David Braun/Russellianism and Prediction 59–105. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 105:309-310.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Branden Fitelson, Christopher Stephens & Elliott Sober (1999). Review: How Not to Detect Design. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 66 (3):472 - 488.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Christopher Stephens (1996). Modelling Reciprocal Altruism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (4):533-551.
    Biologists rely extensively on the iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game to model reciprocal altruism. After examining the informal conditions necessary for reciprocal altruism, I argue that formal games besides the standard iterated Prisoner's Dilemma meet these conditions. One alternate representation, the modified Prisoner's Dilemma game, removes a standard but unnecessary condition; the other game is what I call a Cook's Dilemma. We should explore these new models of reciprocal altruism because they predict different stability characteristics for various strategies; for instance, I (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Charles D. Laughlin, John Mcmanus & Christopher D. Stephens (1981). A Model of Brain and Symbol. Semiotica 33 (3-4).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation