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  1.  8
    Christopher Watkin (2011). Difficult Atheism: Post-Theological Thinking in Alain Badiou, Jean-Luc Nancy and Quentin Meillassoux. Edinburgh University Press.
    Atheisms Today -- The God of Metaphysics -- The God of the Poets -- Difficult Atheism -- Beyond A/theism? Quentin Meillassoux -- The Politics of the Post-Theological I: Justifying the Political -- The Politics of the Post-Theological II: Justice -- General Conclusion: How to Follow an 'Atheism' That Never Was.
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  2.  2
    Christopher Watkin (2015). Michel Serres' Great Story: From Biosemiotics to Econarratology. Substance 44 (3):171-187.
    From the background noise, nothing follows. Or sometimes. But that’s another story. From the five volumes of his Hermès series and through to The Natural Contract in 1990, Michel Serres has rooted the origins of human language firmly in the rhythms and calls of the natural world.1 To date, the Anglophone reception of this complex and varied oeuvre has been slender to the point of emaciation, but one area where he has received some small fraction of the attention he deserves (...)
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    Christopher Watkin (2014). Ricœur and the Autonomy of Philosophy. Philosophy Today 58 (3):411-425.
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    Christopher Watkin (2007). Neither/Nor: Jean-Luc Nancy's Deconstruction of Christianity. [REVIEW] Research in Phenomenology 37 (1):136-143.
  5.  1
    Christopher Watkin (2015). Rewriting the Death of the Author: Rancièrian Reflections. Philosophy and Literature 39 (1):32-46.
    It is possible to study the idea of the “death of the author” as a quaint museum piece of faded 1960s structuralist memorabilia, as an idea that characterized an era that, whatever it once was, is certainly not our own. Such a presentation is the fare in countless graduate literature courses and a sin to which some, if not many, of us would plead guilty. However, the idea of the death or disappearance of the author has, since the two inaugural (...)
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