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  1. Christopher Winch (2013). Education and Broad Concepts of Agency. Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-15.
    Drawing on recent debates about the relationship between propositional and practical knowledge, this article is concerned with broad concepts of agency. Specifically, it is concerned with agency that involves the forming and putting into effect of intentions over relatively extended periods, particularly in work contexts (called, for want of a better term, ?project management?). The main focus of interest is thus not on ?know-how? in the sense of ability to perform types of tasks but on the ability to form and (...)
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  2. Christopher Winch (2013). Learning at Work and in the Workplace: Reflections on Paul Hager's Advocacy of Work-Based Learning. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (12):1205-1218.
    Sound initial vocational education is an important precondition for subsequent episodes of vocational education or professional development. The presence of strong occupational identities and labour markets is argued to be a precondition for high-quality initial vocational education and training (IVET) and continuing vocational education and training (CVET) in many countries. The question of whether occupational identity and boundaries are in decline or are relatively stable is examined in relation to the UK and to northern European countries, particularly Germany. A review (...)
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  3. Christopher Winch (2013). Three Different Conceptions of Know‐How and Their Relevance to Professional and Vocational Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (2):281-298.
    This article discusses three related aspects of know-how: skill, transversal abilities and project management abilities, which are often not distinguished within either the educational or the philosophical literature. Skill or the ability to perform tasks is distinguished from possession of technique which is a necessary but not sufficient condition for possession of a skill. The exercise of skill, contrary to much opinion, usually involves character aspects of agency. Skills usually have a social dimension and are subject to normative appraisal. Transversal (...)
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  4. Christopher Winch (2012). Curriculum Design and Epistemic Ascent. Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (4):128-146.
    Three kinds of knowledge usually recognised by epistemologists are identified and their relevance for curriculum design is discussed. These are: propositional knowledge, know-how and knowledge by acquaintance. The inferential nature of propositional knowledge is argued for and it is suggested that propositional knowledge in fact presupposes the ability to know how to make appropriate inferences within a body of knowledge, whether systematic or unsystematic. This thesis is developed along lines suggested in the earlier work of Paul Hirst. The different kinds (...)
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  5. Christopher Winch (2012). Research in Vocational Education and Training. British Journal of Educational Studies 60 (1):53 - 63.
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  6. Christopher Winch (2012). Vocational and Civic Education: Whither British Policy? Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (4):603-618.
    The current crisis in British VET (Vocational Education and Training) is explained in terms of the decline of opportunities beyond preparation for university for young people after school. The continuing large numbers of ‘NEETS’ (those not in employment, education or training) is but one aspect of this problem: much larger is the decline in good quality VET opportunities for those who do not intend to go to university. A very important element in the problem is a misunderstanding of the relationship (...)
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  7. Christopher Winch (2010). Learning the Virtues at Work. Ethics and Education 5 (2):173-185.
    An influential view of education is that it prepares young people for adult life, usually in the areas of civic engagement, leisure and contemplation. Employment may be a locus for learning some worthwhile skills and knowledge, but it is not itself the possible locus or one of the possible loci of a worthwhile life. This article disputes that view by drawing attention to those aspects of employment that make it potentially an aspect of a worthwhile life. The exercise and development (...)
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  8. Christopher Winch (2010). Vocational Education, Knowing How and Intelligence Concepts. Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (4):551-567.
    Debates about the nature of practical knowledge and its relationship with declarative knowledge have, over the last ten years, been lively. Relatively little has, however, been written about the educational implications of these debates, particularly about the educational implications of the two broad families of positions known respectively as ‘Intellectualism’ and ‘Anti-intellectualism’. Neither has much appeared in the literature about what Ryle called ‘intelligence epithets’ or evaluative elaborations on attributions of know how. Yet the use of intelligence epithets is a (...)
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  9. Christopher Winch (2009). Ryle on Knowing How and the Possibility of Vocational Education. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):88-101.
    abstract Ryle's claim that knowing how is distinct from knowing that is defended from critics like Stanley and Williamson and Snowdon. However, the way in which Ryle himself deploys this distinction is problematic. By effectively dismissing the idea that systematic propositional knowledge has a significant bearing on knowledge how, Ryle implicitly supports a view of vocational education that favours narrow notions of skill and associated training over knowledge informed occupational practice of the kind found in most Northern European countries. The (...)
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  10. Christopher Winch (2008). Learning How to Learn: A Critique. Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):649-665.
    The claim that 'learning how to learn' is the central ability required for young people to be effective 'lifelong learners' is examined for various plausible interpretations. It is vacuous if taken to mean that we need to acquire a capacity to learn, since we necessarily have this if we are to learn anything. The claim that it is a specific ability is then looked at. Once again, if we acquire an ability to learn we do not need the ability to (...)
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  11. Christopher Winch (2008). Nozick on Security and Sustainability. In Stephen Gough & Andrew Stables (eds.), Sustainability and Security Within Liberal Societies: Learning to Live with the Future. Routledge. 70.
     
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  12. Christopher Winch (2008). Philosophy of Education: The Key Concepts. Routledge.
    This new edition of Philosophy of Education: The Key Concepts is an easy to use A-Z guide summarizing all the key terms, ideas and issues central to the study of educational theory today. Fully updated, the book is cross-referenced throughout and contains pointers to further reading, as well as new entries on such topics as: Citizenship and Civic Education Liberalism Capability Well-being Patriotism Globalisation Open-mindedness Creationism and Intelligent Design. Comprehensive and authoritative this highly accessible guide provides all that a student, (...)
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  13. John Gingell & Christopher Winch (2006). Is Educational Research Any Use? Studies in Philosophy and Education 25 (1-2):77-91.
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  14. Christopher Winch (2006). Education, Autonomy and Critical Thinking. Routledge.
    The concepts of autonomy and of critical thinking play a central role in many contemporary accounts of the aims of education. This book analyses their relationship to each other and to education, exploring their roles in mortality and politics before examining the role of critical thinking in fulfilling the educational aim of preparing young people for autonomy. The author analyses different senses of the terms 'autonomy' and 'critical thinking' and the implications for education. Implications of the discussion for contemporary practice (...)
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  15. Christopher Winch (2006). Rules, Technique, and Practical Knowledge: A Wittgensteinian Exploration of Vocational Learning. Educational Theory 56 (4):407-421.
  16. Linda Clarke & Christopher Winch (2004). Apprenticeship and Applied Theoretical Knowledge. Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (5):509–521.
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  17. Frieda Heyting & Christopher Winch (2004). The Role of Critique in Philosophy of Education: Its Subject Matter and its Ambiguities. Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (3):311–321.
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  18. T. Puolimatka, Sphere Pluralism & Christopher Winch (2004). The Many Faces of Philosophy of Education: Traditions, Problems and Challenges. Studies in Philosophy and Education 23:491-493.
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  19. Christopher Winch (2004). Developing Critical Rationality as a Pedagogical Aim. Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (3):467–484.
  20. Christopher Winch (2004). Education, Work and Social Capital: Towards a New Conception of Vocational Education. A Response to Richard Barrett. Studies in Philosophy and Education 23 (1):73-80.
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  21. Christopher Winch (2004). What Do Teachers Need to Know About Teaching? A Critical Examination of the Occupational Knowledge of Teachers. British Journal of Educational Studies 52 (2):180 - 196.
    Various attempts to specify the nature of professions in general and of teaching in particular in relation to the knowledge that is needed for practice are considered. It is argued that there is no epistemic or moral criterion of professionalism that will sustain the claim of teaching to be a profession. The nature of teachers' knowledge is examined and the relationship between theory and application is seen to be both crucial to and problematic in our understanding of the nature of (...)
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  22. Christopher Winch (2004). Work, the Aims of Life and the Aims of Education: A Reply to Clarke and Mearman. Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (4):633–638.
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  23. Christopher Winch & John Gingell (2004). Introduction. Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (5):479–483.
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  24. Christopher Winch (2003). Occupational Identity and Vocational Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 35 (1):117–121.
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  25. Christopher Winch (2002). Representation and Education: Reply to McKenzie. Educational Philosophy and Theory 34 (3):353–356.
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  26. Christopher Winch (2002). Strong Autonomy and Education. Educational Theory 52 (1):27-41.
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  27. Christopher Winch (2002). The Economic Aims of Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (1):101–117.
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  28. Christopher Winch (2002). Work, Well–Being and Vocational Education: The Ethical Significance of Work and Preparation for Work. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (3):261–271.
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  29. Christopher Winch (2001). Accountability and Relevance in Educational Research. Journal of Philosophy of Education 35 (3):443–459.
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  30. Christopher Winch (2001). Towards a Non-Punitive School Inspection Régime. Journal of Philosophy of Education 35 (4):683–694.
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  31. John Gingell & Christopher Winch (2000). Curiouser and Curiouser: Davis, White and Assessment. Journal of Philosophy of Education 34 (4):673–685.
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  32. Christopher Winch (1999). Autonomy as an Educational Aim. In Roger Marples (ed.), The Aims of Education. Routledge. 74--84.
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  33. Christopher Winch (1999). Key Concepts in the Philosophy of Education. Routledge.
    In a clear and lively manner, this new reference explains all of the essential concepts used in contemporary and modern philosophy of education. It also provides invaluable background on the classic educational philosophy texts of Rousseau, Plato and others--readers will find coverage of seminal views on teaching, learning and indoctrination as well as such contemporary concepts as postmodernism, markets and school effectiveness . Students, researchers and anyone interested in contemporary education will be certain to want this unique and authoritative resource.
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  34. Christopher Winch (1998). Education and Constructivism. In David Carr (ed.), Education, Knowledge, and Truth: Beyond the Postmodern Impasse. Routledge. 191.
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  35. Christopher Winch (1998). Markets, Educational Opportunities and Education: Reply to Tooley. Journal of Philosophy of Education 32 (3):429–436.
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  36. Christopher Winch (1998). The Philosophy of Human Learning. Routledge.
    Christopher Winch launches a vigorous Wittgensteinian attack on both the "romantic" Rousseauian and the "scientific" cognitivist traditions in learning theory. These two schools, he argues, are more closely related than is commonly realized.
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  37. Christopher Winch (1997). The Representational Theory of Learning and its Pedagogic Relevance. Educational Philosophy and Theory 29 (2):67–82.
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  38. Christopher Winch (1996). Rousseau on Learning: A Re-Evaluation. Educational Theory 46 (4):415-428.
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  39. Christopher Winch & John Gingell (1996). Educational Assessment: Reply to Andrew Davis. Journal of Philosophy of Education 30 (3):377–388.
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  40. Christopher Winch (1995). Vocational Education ? A Liberal Interpretation. Studies in Philosophy and Education 14 (4):401-415.
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  41. Christopher Winch & Peter Wells (1995). Christopher Winch and Peter Wells,Nene College, Northampton. British Journal of Educational Studies 43 (1):75-87.
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  42. Christopher Winch (1991). Moral Education, Rules and Particular Cases. Journal of Philosophy of Education 25 (1):129–134.
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  43. Christopher Winch (1989). Reading and the Process of Reading. Journal of Philosophy of Education 23 (2):303–315.
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  44. Christopher Winch (1988). The Honey Trap: The Social and Cognitive Adequacy of Language in Educational Contexts. Journal of Applied Philosophy 5 (2):211-224.
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  45. Christopher Winch (1988). Ability, Intelligence and Practical Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 22 (1):35–45.
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  46. Christopher Winch (1985). Women, Reason and Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 19 (1):91–98.