Search results for 'Chrysippus' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Susanne Bobzien (1993). Chrysippus' Modal Logic and Its Relation to Philo and Diodorus. In K. Doering & Th Ebert (eds.), Dialektiker und Stoiker. Franz Steiner. 63--84.score: 18.0
    ABSTRACT: The modal systems of the Stoic logician Chrysippus and the two Hellenistic logicians Philo and Diodorus Cronus have survived in a fragmentary state in several sources. From these it is clear that Chrysippus was acquainted with Philo’s and Diodorus’ modal notions, and also that he developed his own in contrast of Diodorus’ and in some way incorporated Philo’s. The goal of this paper is to reconstruct the three modal systems, including their modal definitions and modal theorems, and (...)
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  2. John Bowin (2003). Chrysippus' Puzzle About Identity. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 24:239-251.score: 18.0
    In 'Chrysippus' Puzzle about Identity', John Bowin (thereafter JB) cogently strengthens David Sedley's reading of the puzzle of Chrysippus as a reductio ad absurdum of the Growing Argument. For Sedley, Chrysippus reduces to absurdity the assumption that matter is the sole principle of identity by refuting its presupposition that the two protagonists of the puzzle, namely Theon and Dion, are related as part to the whole. According to Plutarch's Comm. not. 1083 a8-c1, however, the Growing Argument concludes (...)
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  3. Jay Newhard (2009). The Chrysippus Intuition and Contextual Theories of Truth. Philosophical Studies 142 (3):345 - 352.score: 18.0
    Contextual theories of truth are motivated primarily by the resolution they provide to paradoxical reasoning about truth. The principal argument for contextual theories of truth relies on a key intuition about the truth value of the proposition expressed by a particular utterance made during paradoxical reasoning, which Anil Gupta calls “the Chrysippus intuition.” In this paper, I argue that the principal argument for contextual theories of truth is circular, and that the Chrysippus intuition is false. I conclude that (...)
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  4. Author unknown, Chrysippus. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 15.0
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  5. Q. U. Hongmei (2013). A Comparative Study on Confucius' and Chrysippus' Cosmopolitan Theories. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 8 (3):397-409.score: 15.0
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  6. Susanne Bobzien (1999). Chrysippus' Theory of Causes. In Katerina Ierodiakonou (ed.), Topics in Stoic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    ABSTRACT: A systematic reconstruction of Chrysippus’ theory of causes, grounded on the Stoic tenets that causes are bodies, that they are relative, and that all causation can ultimately be traced back to the one ‘active principle’ which pervades all things. I argue that Chrysippus neither developed a finished taxonomy of causes, nor intended to do so, and that he did not have a set of technical terms for mutually exclusive classes of causes. Rather, the various adjectives which he (...)
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  7. Susanne Bobzien (2002). Chrysippus and the Epistemic Theory of Vagueness. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 102 (1):217-238.score: 12.0
    ABSTRACT: Recently a bold and admirable interpretation of Chrysippus’ position on the Sorites has been presented, suggesting that Chrysippus offered a solution to the Sorites by (i) taking an epistemicist position1 which (ii) made allowances for higher-order vagueness. In this paper I argue (i) that Chrysippus did not take an epistemicist position, but − if any − a non-epistemic one which denies truth-values to some cases in a Sorites-series, and (ii) that it is uncertain whether and how (...)
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  8. Michael Rescorla (2009). Chrysippus' Dog as a Case Study in Non-Linguistic Cognition. In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press. 52--71.score: 12.0
    I critique an ancient argument for the possibility of non-linguistic deductive inference. The argument, attributed to Chrysippus, describes a dog whose behavior supposedly reflects disjunctive syllogistic reasoning. Drawing on contemporary robotics, I urge that we can equally well explain the dog's behavior by citing probabilistic reasoning over cognitive maps. I then critique various experimentally-based arguments from scientific psychology that echo Chrysippus's anecdotal presentation.
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  9. Harry Ide (1992). Chrysippus's Response to Diodorus's Master Argument. History and Philosophy of Logic 13 (2):133-148.score: 12.0
    Chrysippus claims that some propositions perish. including some true conditionals whose consequent is impossible and antecedent is possible, to which he appeals against Diodorus?s Master Argument. On the standard interpretation. perished propositions lack truth values. and these conditionals are true at the same time as their antecedents arc possible and consequents impossible. But perished propositions are false, and Chrysippus?s conditionals are true when their antecedent and consequent arc possible, and false when their antecedent is possible and consequent impossible. (...)
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  10. Michael Papazian (2012). Chrysippus Confronts the Liar: The Case for Stoic Cassationism. History and Philosophy of Logic 33 (3):197-214.score: 12.0
    The Stoic philosopher Chrysippus wrote extensively on the liar paradox, but unfortunately the extant testimony on his response to the paradox is meager and mainly hostile. Modern scholars, beginning with Alexander Rüstow in the first decade of the twentieth century, have attempted to reconstruct Chrysippus? solution. Rüstow argued that Chrysippus advanced a cassationist solution, that is, one in which sentences such as ?I am speaking falsely? do not express propositions. Two more recent scholars, Walter Cavini and Mario (...)
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  11. Michael B. Papazian (2001). Chrysippus and the Destruction of Propositions: A Defence of the Standard Interpretation. History and Philosophy of Logic 22 (1):1-12.score: 12.0
    One of the most intriguing claims of Stoic logic is Chrysippus's denial of the modal principle that the impossible does not follow from the possible. Chrysippus's argument against this principle involves the idea that some propositions are ?destroyed? or ?perish?. According to the standard interpretation of Chrysippus's argument, propositions cease to exist when they are destroyed. Ide has presented an alternative interpretation according to which destroyed propositions persist after destruction and are false. I argue that Ide's alternative (...)
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  12. Ricardo Salles (2004). Bivalencia, fatalismo e inacción en Crisipo (Bivalence, Fatalism and Inaction in Chrysippus). Crítica 36 (106):3 - 27.score: 12.0
    Este ensayo ofrece un análisis del argumento de Crisipo a favor de que todo tiene una causa en Cicerón, De Fato 20. Para ello, se discute en qué sentido el argumento es fatalista y si el tipo de fatalismo que implica alienta la inacción. Asimismo, se presenta una nueva interpretación de la réplica de Crisipo al Argumento Perezoso en Eusebio, Praep. ev. 6.8.28. En particular se sostiene que, para Crisipo, la relación entre sucesos codestinados es analítica: a fin de determinar (...)
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  13. John Cooper, Sept. 7, 2007 Chrysippus on Physical Elements.score: 12.0
    My ultimate purpose here is to examine, discuss, and interpret a difficult excerpt in Stobaeus’ 5th c. AD anthology, alleging to report—uniquely, it appears—a distinction Chrysippus drew between three different applications of the term stoixe›on or element (i.e., physical element).1 Stobaeus lists this passage as giving opinions specifically of Chrysippus “about the elements out of substance” (per‹ t«n §k t∞w oÈs€aw stoixe€vn), though in holding them he says Chrysippus was following Zeno, the leader of his sect. Hermann (...)
     
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  14. Christoph Jedan (2009). Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Theological Foundations of Stoic Ethics. Continuum.score: 12.0
    Introduction -- A religious world-view -- Stoic corporealism -- Stoic theology -- Two pictures of fate -- Virtue and the virtues -- Definitions of virtue -- Chrysippus : characterisation of virtue as perfect state -- Virtue as consistent character -- The virtues as epistmai -- The virtues, different yet inseparable -- The difference between the virtues -- The inseparability of the virtues -- A catalogue of virtues -- Ethical virtues additional (generic) virtues -- The openness of Chrysippus catalogue (...)
     
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  15. Jim Stone (2002). Why Sortal Essentialism Cannot Solve Chrysippus’s Puzzle. Analysis 62 (275):216–223.score: 9.0
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  16. Priscilla K. Sakezles (2007). Aristotle and Chrysippus on the Psychology of Human Action: Criteria for Responsibility. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):225 – 252.score: 9.0
  17. Eric Brown (2008). Contemplative Withdrawal in the Hellenistic Age. Philosophical Studies 137 (1):79 - 89.score: 9.0
    I reject the traditional picture of philosophical withdrawal in the Hellenistic Age by showing how both Epicureans and Stoics oppose, in different ways, the Platonic and Aristotelian assumption that contemplative activity is the greatest good for a human being. Chrysippus the Stoic agrees with Plato and Aristotle that the greatest good for a human being is virtuous activity, but he denies that contemplation exercises virtue. Epicurus more thoroughly rejects the assumption that the greatest good for a human being is (...)
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  18. Teun Tieleman (2003). Chrysippus' on Affections: Reconstruction and Interpretations. Brill.score: 9.0
    This book provides a fresh discussion of the extant evidence, i.e. the fragments and testimonies preserved by later sources.
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  19. Christopher Gill (1983). Did Chrysippus Understand Medea? Phronesis 28 (2):136 - 149.score: 9.0
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  20. Keimpe Algra (1990). Chrysippus on Virtuous Abstention From Ugly Old Women (Plutarch, Sr 1038E–1039A). Classical Quarterly 40 (02):450-.score: 9.0
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  21. Josiah B. Gould (1967). Chrysippus: On the Criteria for the Truth of a Conditional Proposition. Phronesis 12 (1):152-161.score: 9.0
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  22. Susanne Bobzien (2005). Early Stoic Determinism. Revue de Métaphysique Et de Morale 4 (4):489-516.score: 9.0
    ABSTRACT: Although from the 2nd century BC to the 3rd AD the problems of determinism were discussed almost exclusively under the heading of fate, early Stoic determinism, as introduced by Zeno and elaborated by Chrysippus, was developed largely in Stoic writings on physics, independently of any specific "theory of fate ". Stoic determinism was firmly grounded in Stoic cosmology, and the Stoic notions of causes, as corporeal and responsible for both sustenance and change, and of effects as incorporeal and (...)
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  23. Helen Cullyer (2008). Chrysippus on Achilles: The Evidence of Galen de Placitis Hippocratis Et Platonis 4.6–7. Classical Quarterly 58 (02):537-.score: 9.0
  24. Michael J. White (1982). Zeno's Arrow, Divisible Infinitesimals, and Chrysippus. Phronesis 27 (3):239 - 254.score: 9.0
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  25. Josiah Gould (1970). The Philosophy of Chrysippus. Leiden,Brill.score: 9.0
    PHILOSOPHY AND CULTURAL CHANGE Harold Taylor The relation between philosophy and education has grown more and more tenuous as the practitioners of each have ...
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  26. Luciano Floridi (1997). Scepticism and Animal Rationality: The Fortune of Chrysippus' Dog in the History of Western Thought. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 79 (1):27-57.score: 9.0
  27. Christopher Gill (2005). Chrysippus on Psychology T. Tieleman: Chrysippus' On Affections. Reconstruction and Interpretation . (Philosophia Antiqua 94.) Pp. Xii + 346. Leiden: Brill, 2003. Cased. ISBN: 90-04-12998-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):449-.score: 9.0
  28. Jaap Mansfeld (1989). Chrysippus and the Placita. Phronesis 34 (1):311-342.score: 9.0
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  29. Michael J. White (1982). Zeno's A Rrow, Divisible Infinitesimals, and Chrysippus. Phronesis 27 (3):239-254.score: 9.0
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  30. Henry Dyson (2012). Stoic Ethics (C.) Jedan Stoic Virtues. Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics. Pp. Xii + 230. London and New York: Continuum, 2009. Cased, £65. ISBN: 978-1-4411-1252-1. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 62 (2):423-425.score: 9.0
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  31. Graeme Hunter (1994). A Ciceronian Critique of Chrysippus. Apeiron 27 (1):17 - 23.score: 9.0
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  32. Anna Eunyoung Ju (2007). Chrysippus on Nature and Soul in Animals. Classical Quarterly 57 (01):97-.score: 9.0
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  33. David G. Robertson (2004). Chrysippus on Mathematical Objects. Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):169-191.score: 9.0
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  34. A. A. Long (1973). Chrysippus. The Classical Review 23 (02):214-.score: 9.0
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  35. A. A. Long (1973). Chrysippus Josiah B. Gould: The Philosophy of Chrysippus. (Philosophia Antiqua, Xvii.) Pp. Vi+222. Leiden: Brill, 1970. Paper, Fl. 32. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 23 (02):214-216.score: 9.0
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  36. Gretchen J. Reydams-Schils (2004). Galen & Chrysippus on the Soul. Ancient Philosophy 24 (2):510-519.score: 9.0
  37. Priscilla K. Sakezles (1998). Aristotle and Chrysippus on the Physiology of Human Action. Apeiron 31 (2):127 - 165.score: 9.0
  38. Rumania Bhatta, Siriga Bhupala, Wang Bi, Purushottama Bilimoria, Perry Black, Lawrence A. Blum, Jiwei Ci, Stanley G. Clarke, John Collins & John M. Cooper (1995). Cannon, WB, 297 Caraka. 41, 67,280 Carroll, Noel, 15 Chisholm, Roderick M., 15 Chrysippus the Stoic, 9. In Roger Ames, Robert C. Solomon & Joel Marks (eds.), Emotions in Asian Thought: A Dialogue in Comparative Philosophy. Suny Press.score: 9.0
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  39. David Blank (2011). Reading Between the Lies: Plutarch and Chrysippus on the Uses of Poetry. In Michael Frede, James V. Allen, Eyjólfur Kjalar Emilsson, Wolfgang-Rainer Mann & Benjamin Morison (eds.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 40--237.score: 9.0
     
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  40. Susanne Bobzien (2011). The Combinatorics of Stoic Conjunction; or, Hipparchus Refuted, Chrysippus Vindicated. In James Allen, Eyjólfur Kjalar Emilsson, Benjamin Morison & Wolfgang-Rainer Mann (eds.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, Volume 40: Essays in Memory of Michael Frede. Oup Oxford.score: 9.0
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  41. Jacques Brunschwig (forthcoming). On a Book Title by Chrysippus:“On the Fact That the Ancients Admitted Dialectic Along with Demonstrations”. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy.score: 9.0
     
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  42. John M. Cooper (2009). Chrysippus on Physical Elements. In Ricardo Salles (ed.), God and Cosmos in Stoicism. Oxford University Press.score: 9.0
     
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  43. Adam Drozdek (forthcoming). Infinity in Chrysippus. Hermes.score: 9.0
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  44. Peter Frano (2013). Cicero's Reflections on Chrysippus' Theory Peri Sympatheias in His De Fato (IV, 7-V, II). Filozofia 68 (2):93-104.score: 9.0
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  45. E. M. Griffiths (2013). C. Collard, M. Cropp (Edd., Trans.) Euripides VIII. Fragments: Oedipus–Chrysippus, Other Fragments. (Loeb Classical Library 506.) Pp. Xxiv + 710. Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press, 2008. Cased, £15.95, €18, US$24. ISBN: 978-0-674-99631-1. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (2):620.score: 9.0
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  46. A. Grilli (1996). Stoic Philosophy and the Question of How Quintilian Knew Chrysippus. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 51 (2):245-256.score: 9.0
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  47. M. Iehael Reseorla (2009). Chrysippus' Dog as a Case Study In. In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press.score: 9.0
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