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  1. Alexander A. Aarts, Cilia L. M. Witteman, Pierre M. Souren & Jos I. M. Egger (2012). Associations Between Psychologists' Thinking Styles and Accuracy on a Diagnostic Classification Task. Synthese 189 (S1):119-130.
    The present study investigated whether individual differences between psychologists in thinking styles are associated with accuracy in diagnostic classification. We asked novice and experienced clinicians to classify two clinical cases of clients with two co-occurring psychological disorders. No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy was found between the two groups, but when combining the data from novices and experienced psychologists accuracy was found to be negatively associated with certain decision making strategies and with a higher self-assessed ability and preference for a (...)
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  2. Cilia Witteman & Wiebe Hoek (2012). Erratum To: Introduction Chapter. Synthese 189 (S1):185-185.
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  3. Cilia Witteman & Wiebe Hoek (2012). Introduction Chapter. Synthese 189 (S1):1-3.
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  4. Cilia Witteman & Wiebe van der Hoek (2012). Erratum To: Introduction Chapter. Synthese 189 (1):185-185.
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  5. Cilia Witteman & Wiebe van der Hoek (2012). Introduction Chapter. Synthese 189 (1):1-3.
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  6. Cilia Witteman & Andreas Glöckner (2011). Beyond Dual-Process Models: A Categorisation of Processes Underlying Intuitive Judgement and Decision Making. Thinking and Reasoning 16 (1):1-25.
    Intuitive-automatic processes are crucial for making judgements and decisions. The fascinating complexity of these processes has attracted many decision researchers, prompting them to start investigating intuition empirically and to develop numerous models. Dual-process models assume a clear distinction between intuitive and deliberate processes but provide no further differentiation within both categories. We go beyond these models and argue that intuition is not a homogeneous concept, but a label used for different cognitive mechanisms. We suggest that these mechanisms have to be (...)
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  7. Andreas Glöckner & Cilia Witteman (2010). Beyond Dual-Process Models: A Categorisation of Processes Underlying Intuitive Judgement and Decision Making. Thinking and Reasoning 16 (1):1 – 25.
    Intuitive-automatic processes are crucial for making judgements and decisions. The fascinating complexity of these processes has attracted many decision researchers, prompting them to start investigating intuition empirically and to develop numerous models. Dual-process models assume a clear distinction between intuitive and deliberate processes but provide no further differentiation within both categories. We go beyond these models and argue that intuition is not a homogeneous concept, but a label used for different cognitive mechanisms. We suggest that these mechanisms have to be (...)
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  8. Marieke De Vries, Rob W. Holland & Cilia Lm Witteman (2008). Fitting Decisions: Mood and Intuitive Versus Deliberative Decision Strategies. Cognition and Emotion 22 (5):931-943.
  9. Cilia L. M. Witteman, Clare Harries, Hilary L. Bekker & Edward J. M. Van Aarle (2007). Evaluating Psychodiagnostic Decisions. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (1):10-15.
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