Search results for 'Citizenship' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Australian Citizenship (2000). And Will Sanders, Eds., Citizenship and Indigenous Australians: Changing Conceptions and Possibilities, Melbourne, Cambridge University Press, 1998. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 78 (3):418428.score: 180.0
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  2. Dirk Matten, Andrew Crane & Wendy Chapple (2003). Behind the Mask: Revealing the True Face of Corporate Citizenship. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 45 (1-2):109 - 120.score: 24.0
    This paper traces the development of corporate citizenship as a way of framing business and society relations, and critically examines the content of contemporary understandings of the term. These conventional views of corporate citizenship are argued to contribute little or nothing to existing notions of corporate social responsibility and corporate philanthropy. The paper then proposes a new direction, which particularly exposes the element of "citizenship". Being a political concept, citizenship can only be reasonably understood from that (...)
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  3. Martha Nussbaum (2002). Education for Citizenship in an Era of Global Connection. Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (4/5):289-303.score: 24.0
    Higher education makes an importantcontribution to citizenship. In the UnitedStates, the required portion of the ``liberalarts education'' in colleges and universitiescan be reformed so as to equip students for thechallenges of global citizenship. The paperadvocates focusing on three abilities: theSocratic ability to critize one's owntraditions and to carry on an argument on termsof mutual respect for reason; (2) the abilityto think as a citizen of the whole world, notjust some local region or group; and (3) the``narrative imagination,'' the (...)
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  4. Isabelle Maignan & O. C. Ferrell (2000). Measuring Corporate Citizenship in Two Countries: The Case of the United States and France. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 23 (3):283 - 297.score: 24.0
    Based on an extensive review of the literature and field surveys, the paper proposes a conceptualization and operationalization of corporate citizenship meaningful in two countries: the United States and France. A survey of 210 American and 120 French managers provides support for the proposed definition of corporate citizenship as a construct including the four correlated factors of economic, legal, ethical, and discretionary citizenship. The managerial implications of the research and directions for future research are discussed.
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  5. Yusef Waghid (2009). Patriotism and Democratic Citizenship Education in South Africa: On the (Im) Possibility of Reconciliation and Nation Building. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (4):399-409.score: 24.0
    In this article, I shall evaluate critically the democratic citizenship education project in South Africa to ascertain whether the patriotic sentiments expressed in the Manifesto on Values, Education and Democracy (2001) are in conflict with the achievement of reconciliation and nation building (specifically peace and friendship) after decades of apartheid rule. My first argument is that, although it seems as if the teaching of patriotism through the Department of Education's democratic citizenship agenda in South African schools is a (...)
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  6. Daniel Attas (2000). The Case of Guest Workers: Exploitation, Citizenship and Economic Rights. Res Publica 6 (1):73--92.score: 24.0
    Working from a ``capitalist'''' theory of exploitation, based on a neo-classical account of economic value, I argue that guest workers are exploited. It may be objected, however, that since they are not citizens, any inequality that stems from their status as non-citizens is morally unobjectionable. Although host countries are under no moral obligation to admit guest workers as citizens, thereare independent reasons that call for the extension of economicrights – the freedom of occupation in particular – to guestworkers. Since the (...)
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  7. Olivier Boiral (2009). Greening the Corporation Through Organizational Citizenship Behaviors. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (2):221 - 236.score: 24.0
    Organizational citizenship behaviors have been the topic of much research attempting to understand the motivations, manifestations, and impacts of these behaviors on organizational development. However, studies have been based essentially on an anthropocentric and intra-organizational perspective that tends to ignore broader environmental issues. Due to the complexity of environmental issues and their human, informal, and preventive aspects, consideration of these issues requires voluntary and decentralized initiatives that draw on organizational citizenship behaviors. The role of these behaviors has been (...)
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  8. Andrew Dobson (2003). Citizenship and the Environment. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This is the first book-length treatment of the relationship between citizenship and the environment. Andrew Dobson argues that ecological citizenship cannot be fully articulated in terms of the two great traditions of citizenship - liberal and civic republican - with which we have been bequeathed. He develops an original theory of citizenship, which he calls 'post-cosmopolitan', and argues that ecological citizenship is an example and an inflection of it. Ecological citizenship focuses on duties as (...)
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  9. Jeanne M. Logsdon & Donna J. Wood (2005). Global Business Citizenship and Voluntary Codes of Ethical Conduct. Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):55 - 67.score: 24.0
    This article describes the theory and process of global business citizenship (GBC) and applies it in an analysis of characteristics of company codes of business conduct. GBC is distinguished from a commonly used term, “corporate citizenship,” which often denotes corporate community involvement and philanthropy. The GBC process requires (1) a set of fundamental values embedded in the corporate code of conduct and in corporate policies that reflect universal ethical standards; (2) implementation throughout the organization with thoughtful awareness of (...)
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  10. Chieh-Peng Lin (2010). Modeling Corporate Citizenship, Organizational Trust, and Work Engagement Based on Attachment Theory. Journal of Business Ethics 94 (4):517 - 531.score: 24.0
    This study proposes a research model based on attachment theory, which examines the role of corporate citizenship in the formation of organizational trust and work engagement. In the model, work engagement is directly influenced by four dimensions of perceived corporate citizenship, including economic, legal, ethical, and discretionary citizenship, while work engagement is also indirectly affected by perceived corporate citizenship through the mediation of organizational trust. Empirical testing using a survey of personnel from 12 large firms confirms (...)
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  11. Chin-Yi Chen & Chin-Fang Yang (2012). The Impact of Spiritual Leadership on Organizational Citizenship Behavior: A Multi-Sample Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):107-114.score: 24.0
    This study investigates and compares the impact of spiritual leadership on organizational citizenship behavior in finance and retail service industries to determine the possibility of generalizing and applying spiritual leadership to other industries. This study used multi-sample analysis of structural equation modeling. The results show that values, attitudes, and behaviors of leaders have positive effects on meaning/calling and membership of the employees, and further facilitate employees to perform excellent organizational citizenship behaviors, including the altruism of assisting colleagues and (...)
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  12. Muna Golmohamad (2009). Education for World Citizenship: Beyond National Allegiance. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (4):466-486.score: 24.0
    A resurgence of national and international interest in citizenship education, citizenship and social cohesion has been coupled with an apparent emergence of a language of crisis (Sears & Hyslop-Margison, 2006). Given this background, how can or should one consider a subjective sense of membership in a single political community? What this article hopes to show is that confining the subject of citizenship or patriotism to a national framework is inadequate in as much as there are grounds to (...)
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  13. Laurance Splitter (2011). Identity, Citizenship and Moral Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):484-505.score: 24.0
    Questions of identity such as ‘Who am I?’ are often answered by appeals to one or more affiliations with a specific nation (citizenship), culture, ethnicity, religion, etc. Taking as given the idea that identity over time—including identification and re-identification—for objects of a particular kind requires that there be criteria of identity appropriate to things of that kind, I argue that citizenship, as a ‘collectivist’ concept, does not generate such criteria for individual citizens, but that the concept person—which specifies (...)
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  14. Johan de Tavernier (2012). Food Citizenship: Is There a Duty for Responsible Consumption? [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):895-907.score: 24.0
    Labeling of food consumption is related to food safety, food quality, environmental, safety, and social concerns. Future politics of food will be based on a redefinition of commodity food consumption as an expression of citizenship. “Citizen-consumers” realize that they could use their buying power in order to develop a new terrain of social agency and political action. It takes for granted kinds of moral selfhood in which human responsibility is bound into human agency based on knowledge and recognition. This (...)
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  15. Matthias Fritsch (2008). Antagonism and Democratic Citizenship (Schmitt, Mouffe, Derrida). Research in Phenomenology 38 (2):174-197.score: 24.0
    In the context of the recent proliferation of nationalisms and enemy figures, this paper agrees with the desirability of retaining some of the explanatory and motivational potential of an agonistic account of politics, but gives reasons not to accept too much of Carl Schmitt's account of citizenship. The claim as to the necessarily antagonistic exclusion of concrete others can be supported neither on its own terms nor on Derridian grounds, as Chantal Mouffe, in particular, attempts to do. I then (...)
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  16. Şükrü Özen & Fatma Küskü (2009). Corporate Environmental Citizenship Variation in Developing Countries: An Institutional Framework. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):297 - 313.score: 24.0
    This study focuses on why some companies in developing countries go beyond environmental regulations when implementing their corporate environmental social responsibilities or citizenship behavior. Drawing mainly upon the new institutional theory, this study develops a conceptual framework to explain three institutional factors: companies’ market orientations, industrial characteristics, and corporate identities. Accordingly, we suggest that companies from developing countries that are oriented to markets in developed countries, operate in highly concentrated industries, and have missionary identities adopt corporate environmental citizenship (...)
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  17. Peter Roberts (2009). A New Patriotism? Neoliberalism, Citizenship and Tertiary Education in New Zealand. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (4):410-423.score: 24.0
    This paper argues that a new patriotism has emerged in New Zealand over recent years. This has been promoted in tandem with the notion of advancing New Zealand as a knowledge economy and society. The new patriotism encourages New Zealanders to accept, indeed embrace, a single, shared vision of the future: one structured by a neoliberal ontology and the demands of global capitalism. This constructs a narrow view of citizenship and reduces the possibility of economic and social alternatives being (...)
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  18. Ronald Jeurissen (2004). Institutional Conditions of Corporate Citizenship. Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):87-96.score: 24.0
    Exploring the concept of citizenship from the history of political philosophy provides suggestions about what corporate citizenship could mean. The metaphor of corporate citizenship suggests an institutional approach to corporate social responsibility. Citizenship is a social role, characterized by an orientation towards the social contract, collective and active responsibility, as well as a positive attitude towards the juridical state. By analogy, corporate citizenship is a social role, characterized by the social contract of business, a participatory (...)
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  19. Ingo Pies, Markus Beckmann & Stefan Hielscher (2010). Value Creation, Management Competencies, and Global Corporate Citizenship: An Ordonomic Approach to Business Ethics in the Age of Globalization. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):265 - 278.score: 24.0
    This article develops an "ordonomic" approach to business ethics in the age of globalization. Through the use of a three-tiered conceptual framework that distinguishes between the basic game of antagonistic social cooperation, the meta game of rule-setting, and the meta-meta game of rule-finding discourse, we address three questions, the answers to which we believe are crucial to fostering effective business leadership and corporate social responsibility. First, the purpose of business in society is value creation. Companies have a social mandate to (...)
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  20. Ian Davies, Mark Evans & Alan Reid (2005). Globalising Citizenship Education? A Critique of 'Global Education' and 'Citizenship Education'. British Journal of Educational Studies 53 (1):66 - 89.score: 24.0
    This article discusses, principally from an English perspective, globalisation, global citizenship and two forms of education relevant to those developments (global education and citizenship education). We describe what citizenship has meant inside one nation state and ask what citizenship means, and could mean, in a globalising world. By comparing the natures of citizenship education and global education, as experienced principally in England during, approximately, the last three decades, we seek to develop a clearer understanding of (...)
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  21. Arménio Rego, Neuza Ribeiro & Miguel P. Cunha (2010). Perceptions of Organizational Virtuousness and Happiness as Predictors of Organizational Citizenship Behaviors. Journal of Business Ethics 93 (2):215 - 235.score: 24.0
    Moral and financial scandals emerging in recent years around the world have created the momentum for reconsidering the role of virtuousness in organizational settings. This empirical study seeks to contribute toward maintaining this momentum. We answer to researchers’ suggestions that the exploratory study carried out by Cameron et al. (Am Behav Sci 47(6):766–790, 2004 ), which related organizational virtuousness (OV) and performance, must be pursued employing their measure of OV in other contexts and in relation to other outcomes (Wright (...)
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  22. Tomas Englund (2002). Higher Education, Democracy and Citizenship €“ the Democratic Potential of the University? Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (4/5):281-287.score: 24.0
    From a historical point of view, theuniversity as an institution has had the roleof educating an elite, rather than any obvioustask of enforcing democracy. But what kind ofexpectations regarding citizenship anddemocracy can we justifiably have when it comesto the role of higher education and ouruniversities today when higher education isundergoing a process of massification. Couldthe university eventually become a place fordeliberative communication, developingdeliberative qualities among its many students?According to the contributions presented here –stemming from a conference on the theme``Higher (...)
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  23. Alistair Ross (2007). Multiple Identities and Education for Active Citizenship. British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (3):286 - 303.score: 24.0
    This paper explores concepts of multiple and nested identities and how these relate to citizenship and rights, and the implications of identities and rights for active citizenship education. Various theoretical conceptions of identity are analysed, and in particular ideas concerning multiple identities that are used contingently, and about identities that do not necessarily include feeling a strong affinity with others in the group. The argument then moves to the relationship between identity and citizenship, and particularly citizenship (...)
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  24. John J. Ryan (2001). Moral Reasoning as a Determinant of Organizational Citizenship Behaviors: A Study in the Public Accounting Profession. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 33 (3):233 - 244.score: 24.0
    This study examines the relationship between an employee's level of moral reasoning and a form of work performance known as organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB). Prior research in the public accounting profession has found higher levels of moral reasoning to be positively related to various types of ethical behavior. This study extends the ethical domain of accounting behaviors to include OCB. Analysis of respondents from a public accounting firm in the northeast region of the United States (n = 107) support (...)
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  25. Dan S. Chiaburu & Audrey S. Lim (2008). Manager Trustworthiness or Interactional Justice? Predicting Organizational Citizenship Behaviors. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):453 - 467.score: 24.0
    Organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) are essential for effective organizational functioning. Decisions by employees to engage in these important discretionary behaviors are based on how they make sense of the organizational context. Using fairness heuristic theory, we tested two important OCB predictors: manager trustworthiness and interactional justice. In the process, we control for the effects of dispositional factors (propensity to trust) and for system-based organizational fairness (procedural and distributive justice). Results, based on surveys collected from 120 employee–supervisor dyads, indicate that (...)
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  26. David R. Hiley (2006). Doubt and the Demands of Democratic Citizenship. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    The triumph of democracy has been heralded as one of the greatest achievements of the twentieth century, yet it seems to be in a relatively fragile condition in the United States, if one is to judge by the proliferation of editorials, essays, and books that focus on politics and distrust of government. Doubt and the Demands of Democratic Citizenship explores the reasons for public discontent and proposes an account of democratic citizenship appropriate for a robust democracy. David Hiley (...)
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  27. Kudzai Pfuwai Matereke (2012). 'Whipping Into Line': The Dual Crisis of Education and Citizenship in Postcolonial Zimbabwe. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (s2):84-99.score: 24.0
    This article draws from my current research on the challenges that the concept ‘citizenship’ brings to postcolonial Africa. The article takes Zimbabwe as a case study with the view to interrogate how the decade-long crisis has been obfuscated by the elites' manipulation of the education system which has left it redundant for envisioning both postcolonial and world citizenship. First, this article seeks to outline the challenge of enunciating the crisis. Second, it outlines and discusses how the limits of (...)
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  28. R. K. Bentley (2013). Civic Friendship and Thin Citizenship. Res Publica 19 (1):5-19.score: 24.0
    Contemporary appeals for a deepening of civic friendship in liberal democracies often draw on Aristotle. This paper warns against a certain kind of attempt to use Aristotle in our own theorising, namely accounts of civic friendship that characterise it as similar in some way to Aristotelian virtue friendship. The most prominent of these attempts have focused on disinterested mutual regard as a basic ingredient in all Aristotelian forms of friendship. The argument against this is that it inadequately accounts for the (...)
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  29. Eleni Andreouli & Caroline Howarth (2013). National Identity, Citizenship and Immigration: Putting Identity in Context. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 43 (3):361-382.score: 24.0
    In this paper we suggest that there is a need to examine what is meant by “context” in Social Psychology and present an example of how to place identity in its social and institutional context. Taking the case of British naturalisation, the process whereby migrants become citizens, we show that the identity of naturalised citizens is defined by common-sense ideas about Britishness and by immigration policies. An analysis of policy documents on “earned citizenship” and interviews with naturalised citizens shows (...)
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  30. Kor Grit (2004). Corporate Citizenship: How to Strengthen the Social Responsibility of Managers? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):97-106.score: 24.0
    Corporate citizenship challenges the foundations and working of the basic institutions market, state and civil society. These institutional changes complicate the work of the manager, because the responsibilities of management are not only increasing, they are also becoming vaguer and more elusive. In this paper, I will analyze the new, complex responsibilities of management in terms of the scope and the legitimizationof corporate citizenship. What may we expect of individual organizations? Which wishes of which stakeholders should be honored? (...)
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  31. Bruce Haynes (2009). History Teaching for Patriotic Citizenship in Australia. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (4):424-440.score: 24.0
    History has long been taught in Australian schools with a view to encouraging patriotic citizenship. What has been taught and what is meant by patriotic Australian citizenship has changed markedly over the years. Current national initiatives to stimulate and direct the teaching of 'what we all know' to be Australian history may not meet the requirements of acceptable educational practice. The Commonwealth government may be better advised to pursue initiatives that encourage understanding of and commitment to the common (...)
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  32. Muna Golmohamad (2004). World Citizenship, Identity and the Notion of an Integrated Self. Studies in Philosophy and Education 23 (2/3):131-148.score: 24.0
    In light of the complex notions ofidentity, this paper attempts to consider howto perceive the notion of world citizenship.The paper looks to discussions on the self andidentity; focusing on the writing of CharlesTaylor and Alasdair MacIntyre, with particularattention given to the notion of an integratedself.
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  33. Murray Print (2007). Citizenship Education and Youth Participation in Democracy. British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (3):325 - 345.score: 24.0
    Citizenship education in established democracies is challenged by declining youth participation in democracy. Youth disenchantment and disengagement in democracy is primarily evident in formal political behaviour, especially through voting, declining membership of political parties, assisting at elections, contacting politicians, and the like. If citizenship education is to play a major role in addressing these concerns it will need to review the impact it is making on young people in schools. This paper reviews a major national project on youth (...)
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  34. Johan Tavernier (2012). Food Citizenship: Is There a Duty for Responsible Consumption? [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):895-907.score: 24.0
    Labeling of food consumption is related to food safety, food quality, environmental, safety, and social concerns. Future politics of food will be based on a redefinition of commodity food consumption as an expression of citizenship. “Citizen-consumers” realize that they could use their buying power in order to develop a new terrain of social agency and political action. It takes for granted kinds of moral selfhood in which human responsibility is bound into human agency based on knowledge and recognition. This (...)
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  35. Maria Christine Bernadetta Voet (1995). Feminism and Citizenship: Feminist Critiques of the Concept of Social-Liberal Citizenship. M.C.B. Voet.score: 24.0
    Until recently, feminist theory and citizenship theory have seemed two distinct areas, with writers in both camps seldom discussing the other's work.
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  36. Amelie Perron, Trudy Rudge & Dave Holmes (2010). Citizen Minds, Citizen Bodies: The Citizenship Experience and the Government of Mentally Ill Persons. Nursing Philosophy 11 (2):100-111.score: 24.0
    The concept of citizenship is becoming more and more prominent in specific fields, such as psychiatry/mental health, where it is constituted as a solution to the issues of exclusion, discrimination, and poverty often endured by the mentally ill. We argue that such discourse of citizenship represents a break in the history of psychiatry and constitutes a powerful strategy to counter the effects of equally powerful psychiatric labelling. However, we call into question the emancipatory promise of a citizenship (...)
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  37. Alejo José G. Sison (2009). From CSR to Corporate Citizenship: Anglo-American and Continental European Perspectives. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):235 - 246.score: 24.0
    Beginning with the question of who constitutes the firm, this article seeks to explore the historical evolution of concepts such as corporate social responsibility, corporate accountability, corporate social responsiveness, corporate social performance, stakeholder theory, and corporate citizenship. In close parallel to these changes are differences in interpretation from Anglo—American and Continental European perspectives. The author defends that the ultimate reasons behind these differences are of a philosophical nature, affecting both the anthropology and the political theory dominant in each of (...)
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  38. Kenneth A. Strike (1998). Liberalism, Citizenship, and the Private Interest in Schooling. Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (4):221-229.score: 24.0
    Schools in liberal societies are responsible for producing liberal citizens. However, if they have too robust a view of citizenship, they may find themselves undermining the view of good lives held by many pacific and law abiding groups. Here I argue against treating citizenship as an educational good that simply trumps private values when they conflict and in favor of a view that seeks a context sensitive balance between such conflicting goods. The paper explores Rawls's distinction between two (...)
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  39. Michalinos Zembylas (2012). Citizenship Education and Human Rights in Sites of Ethnic Conflict: Toward Critical Pedagogies of Compassion and Shared Fate. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (6):553-567.score: 24.0
    The present essay discusses the value of citizenship as shared fate in sites of ethnic conflict and analyzes its implications for citizenship education in light of three issues: first, the requirements of affective relationality in the notion of citizenship-as-shared fate; second, the tensions between the values of human rights and shared fate in sites of ethnic conflict; and third, the ways in which citizenship education might overcome these tensions without falling into the trap of psychologization and (...)
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  40. Chieh-Peng Lin, Yuan-Hui Tsai, Sheng-Wuu Joe & Chou-Kang Chiu (2012). Modeling the Relationship Among Perceived Corporate Citizenship, Firms' Attractiveness, and Career Success Expectation. Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):83-93.score: 24.0
    Drawing on propositions from the signaling theory and expectancy theory, this study hypothesizes that the perceived corporate citizenship of job seekers positively affects a firm’s attractiveness and career success expectation. This study’s proposed research hypotheses are empirically tested using a survey of graduating MBA students seeking a job. The empirical findings show that a firm’s corporate citizenship provides a competitive advantage in attracting job seekers and fostering optimistic career success expectation. Such findings substantially complement the growing literature arguing (...)
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  41. Maria Olson (2012). The European 'We': From Citizenship Policy to the Role of Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (1):77-89.score: 24.0
    This article sheds light on the European Union’s policy on citizenship; on the collective dimension of this policy, its ‘we’. It is argued that the inclusive, identity-constituting forces prominent in EU policy on European citizenship serve as a basis for the exclusion of people, which is illustrated by the recent expulsion of Romani from France. Based on a reading of Derrida, the twofold aim of this article is to reformulate the concept of a European citizenship ‘we’ and (...)
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  42. Kerry J. Kennedy (2007). Student Constructions of 'Active Citizenship': What Does Participation Mean to Students? British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (3):304 - 324.score: 24.0
    'Active citizenship' is currently a popular term in citizenship education policy discourse. Despite this policy interest, there is no agreement about the meaning of 'active citizenship'. This article draws on data from the IEA Civic Education Study to explore how students themselves construct 'active citizenship'. The results show that students have quite sophisticated conceptions of citizenship responsibilities although their attitudes are gendered. They seem committed to political obligations rather than social obligations and they do not (...)
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  43. Yuhyung Shin (2012). CEO Ethical Leadership, Ethical Climate, Climate Strength, and Collective Organizational Citizenship Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 108 (3):299-312.score: 24.0
    In spite of an increasing number of studies on ethical climate, little is known about the antecedents of ethical climate and the moderators of the relationship between ethical climate and work outcomes. The present study conducted firm-level analyses regarding the relationship between chief executive officer (CEO) ethical leadership and ethical climate, and the moderating effect of climate strength (i.e., agreement in climate perceptions) on the relationship between ethical climate and collective organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). Self-report data were collected from (...)
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  44. John Annette (2005). Character, Civic Renewal and Service Learning for Democratic Citizenship in Higher Education. British Journal of Educational Studies 53 (3):326 - 340.score: 24.0
    This article explores the civic republican conception of citizenship underlying the Labour government's programme of civil renewal and the introduction of education for democratic citizenship. It considers the importance of the cultivation of civic virtue through political participation for such developments and it reviews the research into how service learning linked to character education can lead to the civic virtue of duty or social responsibility.
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  45. Bernard Crick (2007). Citizenship: The Political and the Democratic. British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (3):235 - 248.score: 24.0
    Citizenship as a compulsory subject was added to the National Curriculum in England in 2002 following the 1998 report, 'Education for Citizenship and the Teaching of Democracy in Schools'. It was little noticed at the time that the report stressed active citizenship much more strongly than democracy. The underlying presupposition was what historians call 'civic republicanism' the tradition from the Greeks and the Romans of good government as political government, that is, citizens reaching acceptable compromises of group (...)
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  46. Larry A. Hickman (2004). Pragmatism, Postmodernism, and Global Citizenship. Metaphilosophy 35 (1‐2):65-81.score: 24.0
    Abstract: The founders of American pragmatism proposed what they regarded as a radical alternative to the philosophical methods and doctrines of their predecessors and contemporaries. Although their central ideas have been understood and applied in some quarters, there remain other areas within which they have been neither appreciated nor appropriated. One of the more pressing of these areas locates a set of problems of knowledge and valuation related to global citizenship. This essay attempts to demonstrate that classical American pragmatism, (...)
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  47. Andrew Peterson (2009). Civic Republicanism and Contestatory Deliberation: Framing Pupil Discourse Within Citizenship Education. British Journal of Educational Studies 57 (1):55 - 69.score: 24.0
    Discourse between pupils represents a core element of citizenship education in England. However, as it is currently presented within the curriculum, discourse adopts the form of the rather broad terms of 'discussion' and 'debate'. These terms are diffuse, and in themselves offer little pedagogical guidance for teachers implementing the curriculum in schools. Moreover, there has been little academic reflection in England as to how theoretical ideas on civic dialogue may usefully inform approaches to pupil discourse. For this reason, how (...)
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  48. Dorothée Baumann-Pauly & Andreas Georg Scherer (2013). The Organizational Implementation of Corporate Citizenship: An Assessment Tool and its Application at UN Global Compact Participants. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):1-17.score: 24.0
    The corporate citizenship (CC) concept introduced by Dirk Matten and Andrew Crane has been well received. To this date, however, empirical studies based on this concept are lacking. In this article, we flesh out and operationalize the CC concept and develop an assessment tool for CC. Our tool focuses on the organizational level and assesses the embeddedness of CC in organizational structures and procedures. To illustrate the applicability of the tool, we assess five Swiss companies (ABB, Credit Suisse, Nestlé, (...)
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  49. Olivier Boiral & Pascal Paillé (2012). Organizational Citizenship Behaviour for the Environment: Measurement and Validation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):431-445.score: 24.0
    While the importance of employee initiatives for improving the environmental practices and performance of organizations has been clearly established in the literature, the precise nature of these initiatives has rarely been examined (particularly the issue of their discretionary or mandatory nature). The role of organizational citizenship behaviour in environmental management remains largely unexplored. The main objectives of this paper were to propose and validate an instrument for measuring organizational citizenship behaviour for the environment (OCBE). Exploratory (Study 1, N (...)
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  50. John Halliday (1999). Political Liberalism and Citizenship Education: Towards Curriculum Reform. British Journal of Educational Studies 47 (1):43 - 55.score: 24.0
    This paper is concerned with Rawls's (1993) account of an overlapping consensus and recent proposals to introduce citizenship education in parts of the UK. It is argued that both Rawls and the proposals mistake the significance and nature of such a consensus. Partly as a result of this mistake the proposals are insufficiently radical.
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