Search results for 'Civil rights History' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  4
    Carl B. Anderson (2013). The Trouble with Unifying Narratives: African Americans and the Civil Rights Movement in U.S. History Content Standards. Journal of Social Studies Research 37 (2):111-120.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Robert D. Loevy (1990). To End All Segregation: The Politics of the Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Upa.
    This book traces the early history of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States, showing how brutal police treatment of civil rights demonstrators in Birmingham, Alabama, forced President Kennedy to send a strong civil rights bill to Congress in June of 1963. The various legislative strategies used to get the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through Congress are detailed.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  24
    Ugo Pagallo (2013). Online Security and the Protection of Civil Rights: A Legal Overview. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 26 (4):381-395.
    The paper examines the connection between online security and the protection of civil rights from a legal viewpoint, that is, considering the different types of rights and interests that are at stake in national and international law and whether, and to what extent, they concern matters of balancing. Over the past years, the purpose of several laws, and legislative drafts such as ACTA, has been to impose “zero-sum games”. In light of current statutes, such as HADOPI (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4.  5
    Vincenzo Ferrone (2012). The Politics of Enlightenment: Republicanism, Constitutionalism, and the Rights of Man in Gaetano Filangieri. Anthem Press.
    Written by one of Italy's leading historians, this book analyses the Neapolitan nobleman Gaetano Filangieri and his seven-volume 'Science of Legislation' in their historical context, expounding on his legacy for the histories of ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  6
    Asta Jakutytė-Sungailienė (2012). The System of Objects of Civil Rights: Problem of Concepts. Jurisprudence 19 (1):143-157.
    The Civil Code of Lithuania (1964), in force until 2000, did not regulate the objects of civil rights, thus Chapter V of Part III of Book I of the Civil Code of Lithuania is a significant novelty. Several approaches to an abstract definition of the objects of civil rights still exists in the legal doctrine: whether the object of civil rights and the object of the civil relationship coincide; is the object (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  3
    Hannelore Schröder (1989). The Declaration of Human and Civil Rights for Women by Olympe de Gouges. History of European Ideas 11 (1-6):263-271.
    Paper prepared for the XVIII World Congress of Philosophy, Brighton, U.K.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  7. H. Schroder (1989). The Declaration-of-Human-and-Civil-Rights-for-Women,(Paris, 1791) by Degouges, Olympe. History of European Ideas 11:263-271.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  14
    Nicolas Rost (2011). Human Rights Violations, Weak States, and Civil War. Human Rights Review 12 (4):417-440.
    This study examines the role of human rights violations as a harbinger of civil wars to come, as well as the links between repression, state weakness, and conflict. Human rights violations are both part of the escalating process that may end in civil war and can contribute to an escalation of conflict to civil war, particularly in weak states. The role of government repression and state weakness in leading to civil war is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  1
    Mazhar Siraj (2011). Protection and Advancement of Human Rights in Developing Countries: Luxuries or Necessities? Human Affairs 21 (3):304-315.
    The luxury-versus-necessity controversy is primarily concerned with the importance of civil and political rights vis-à-vis economic and social rights. The viewpoint of political leaders of many developing and newly industrialized countries, especially China, Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia and Indonesia is that civil and political rights are luxuries that only rich nations can afford. The United Nations, transnational civil society and the Western advanced countries oppose this viewpoint on normative and empirical grounds. While this controversy (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Carlo Ruzza (2014). Civil Society Actors and EU Fundamental Rights Policy: Opportunities and Challenges. Human Rights Review 15 (1):65-81.
    This paper examines how civil society actors in the EU utilize the political and legal opportunities provided by the EU’s fundamental rights policy to mobilize against discrimination, notably racism, and xenophobia. It emphasizes the multiple enabling roles that this policy provides to civil society associations engaged in judicial activism, political advocacy, and service delivery both at the EU and Member State levels, and assesses their effectiveness. It describes several factors that hinder the implementation of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (1991). Reassessing Civil Rights.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  59
    Oliver O'Donovan (2009). The Language of Rights and Conceptual History. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (2):193-207.
    The historical problem about the origins of the language of rights derives its importance from the conceptual problem: of "two fundamentally different ways of thinking about justice," which is basic? Is justice unitary or plural? This in turn opens up a problem about the moral status of human nature. A narrative of the origins of "rights" is an account of how and when a plural concept of justice comes to the fore, and will be based on the occurrence (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13.  9
    Fernando Arlettaz (2013). Minority Rights in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights: Conceptual Considerations. Jurisprudence 20 (3):901-922.
    The article discusses the rights of minorities in the system of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. It establishes a conceptual distinction between universal rights, specific rights of minorities in general and specific rights of particular minorities. Universal rights correspond to all individuals (e,g,, “no one shall be subjected to torture”) or all groups of a certain class (e.g., “all families are entitled to protection”). (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  4
    Giorgio Baruchello & Rachael Lorna Johnstone (2011). Rights and Value: Construing the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights as Civil Commons. Studies in Social Justice 5 (1):91-125.
    This article brings together the United Nations’ International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) and John McMurtry’s theory of value. In this perspective, the ICESCR is construed as a prime example of “civil commons,” while McMurtry’s theory of value is proposed as a tool of interpretation of the covenant. In particular, McMurtry’s theory of value is a hermeneutical device capable of highlighting: (a) what alternative conception of value systemically operates against the fulfilment of the (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  1
    Luke Wilcox (2010). Secularists and Islamists in Morocco: Prospects for Building Trust and Civil Society Through Human Rights Reform. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (20):3-25.
    In Morocco’s process of liberalization (and democratization), the dynamics between social actors defining themselves as “secular” and those labeled “Islamist” are critical. This paper probes the possibility of these actors transcending their frequent opposition and building mutual trust and “civil” interaction, thereby strengthening civil society and the possibility of continued reform in Morocco. Using Morocco’s recent Equity and Reconciliation Commission as an analytical tool, the paper focuses on the human rights arena as a potentially (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  11
    Sondra Harcourt & Mark Harcourt (2002). Do Employers Comply with Civil/Human Rights Legislation? New Evidence From New Zealand Job Application Forms. Journal of Business Ethics 35 (3):207-221.
    This study assesses the extent to which job application forms violate the New Zealand Human Rights Act. The sample for the study includes 229 job application forms, collected from a variety of large and small, public- and private-sector organizations that together employ approximately 200,000 workers. Two hundred and four or 88% of the job application forms contain at least one violation of the Act. One hundred and sixty five or 72% contain two or more and 140 or 61% (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  17.  9
    Andreas Frewer (2010). Human Rights From the Nuremberg Doctors Trial to the Geneva Declaration. Persons and Institutions in Medical Ethics and History. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):259-268.
    The “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” and the “Geneva Declaration” by the World Medical Association, both in 1948, were preceded by the foundation of the United Nations in New York (1945), the World Medical Association in London (1946) and the World Health Organization in Geneva (1948). After the end of World War II the community of nations strove to achieve and sustain their primary goals of peace and security, as well as their basic premise, namely the health (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  15
    Steven Conn (2002). Narrative Trauma and Civil War History Painting, or Why Are These Pictures so Terrible? History and Theory 41 (4):17–42.
    The Civil War generated hundreds of history paintings. Yet, as this essay argues, painters failed to create any iconic, lasting images of the Civil War using the conventions of grand manner history painting, despite the expectations of many that they would and should. This essay first examines the terms by which I am evaluating this failure, then moves on to a consideration of the American history painting tradition. I next examine several history paintings of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  10
    Silvia Manzo (2012). Francis Bacon's Natural History and Civil History: A Comparative Survey. Early Science and Medicine 17 (1-2):1-2.
  20.  45
    Troy W. Hartley (1995). Environmental Justice: An Environmental Civil Rights Value Acceptable to All World Views. Environmental Ethics 17 (3):277-289.
    In accordance with environmental injustice, sometimes called environmental racism, minority communities are disproportionately subjected to a higher level of environmental risk than other segments of society. Growing concern over unequal environmental risk and mounting evidence of both racial and economic injustices have led to a grass-roots civil rights campaign called the environmental justice movement. The environmental ethics aspects of environmental injustice challenge narrow utilitarian views and promote Kantian rights and obligations. Nevertheless, an environmentaljustice value (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21.  20
    Melinda Vadas (1992). The Pornography / Civil Rights Ordinance V. The BOG: And the Winner Is...? Hypatia 7 (3):94 - 109.
    The Supreme Court dismissed the Pornography/Civil Rights Ordinance as an unconstitutional restriction of speech. The Court's dismissal itself violates the free speech of the proposers of the Ordinance. It is not possible for both pornographers to perform the speech act of making pornography and feminists to perform the speech act of proposing the Ordinance. I show that the speech act of proposing the Ordinance takes First Amendment precedence over the speech act of making pornography.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  15
    Thomas C. Grey (1991). Civil Rights Vs. Civil Liberties: The Case of Discriminatory Verbal Harassment. Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (2):81.
    American liberals believe that both civil liberties and civil rights are harmonious aspects of a basic commitment to human rights. But recently these two clusters of values have seemed increasingly to conflict – as, for example, with the feminist claim that the legal toleration of pornography, long a goal sought by civil libertarians, actually violates civil rights as a form of sex discrimination. Here I propose an (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  5
    Lloyd L. Weinreb (1991). What Are Civil Rights? Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (2):1.
    For all the discussion and debate about civil rights, it is striking how little attention is given initially to the question of what civil rights are. There is no well-understood principle of inclusion or exclusion that defines the category. Nor is there an agreed list of civil rights, except perhaps a very short, avowedly nonexhaustive one, with rather imprecise entries. Yet, if the extension of the category of (...) rights is uncertain, its significance is not. All agree that it is a principal task of government to protect civil rights, so much so, indeed, that a failure to protect them usually is regarded as outweighing substantial achievements of other kinds. But a right does not count as a civil right just because it is valuable or valued. Some of the rights most often asserted as civil rights reflect practical interests of their possessors considerably less than other actual or potential rights not so identified. In the United States, familiar legal doctrine provides a shortcut to the specification of civil rights. They are whatever is embraced by the provisions of the federal Civil Rights Acts: the right to vote, fair housing, equal employment opportunity, and so forth. That path, however, is not adequate for the present purpose. For the most part, the statutes refer explicitly or implicitly to federal constitutional rights, and the collective reference to them as civil rights is unexplained. The bases of the constitutional rights are too various to be a reliable guide to an independently designated category of civil rights. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  5
    Robert E. Emerick (1996). Mad Liberation: The Sociology of Knowledge and the Ultimate Civil Rights Movement. Journal of Mind and Behavior 17 (2):135-160.
    Mad liberation — the former mental patient self-help movement — is characterized in this paper as a true progressive social movement. A sociology of knowledge perspective is used to account for much of the research literature that argues, to the contrary, that self-help groups do not represent a true social movement. Based on the "myth of individualism" and the "myth of simplicity," the psychological literature on self-help has defined empowerment in self-help groups as an individual-change or therapeutic orientation. This paper, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  10
    Mark Tushnet (1991). Change and Continuity in the Concept of Civil Rights: Thurgood Marshall and Affirmative Action. Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (2):150.
    In analyzing the development of the concept of civil rights since the adoption of the Fourteenth Amendment, two historical accounts seem available. According to the first account, the concept initially encompassed a relatively limited set of rights, associated with the ability of all citizens to engage in the productive activities of the economy and avail themselves of the protection of the legal system. Then the concept gradually expanded to include what had initially been thought (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  2
    Tondra L. Loder-Jackson (2012). Hope and Despair: Southern Black Women Educators Across Pre- and Post-Civil Rights Cohorts Theorize About Their Activism. Educational Studies 48 (3):266-295.
    Framed by theoretical perspectives on Black Feminist Thought, the life course, and the Generation X/Hip-Hop generation, I present findings from a subset of 10 Black women educators in Birmingham, Alabama who participated in a larger life story project. The participants, who came of age professionally across the pre- and post-civil rights movement (CRM), describe divergent and convergent social and historical contexts that shaped their professionalization, as well as their relationships with and perceptions of Black students and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  4
    Richard A. Epstein (1991). Two Conceptions of Civil Rights. Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (2):38.
    I. What Vintage of Civil Rights? In this paper I wish to compare and contrast two separate conceptions of civil rights and to argue that the older, more libertarian conception of the subject is preferable to the more widely accepted version used in the modern civil rights movement. The first conception of civil rights focuses on the question of individual capacity. The antithesis of a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  3
    President Ulysses S. Grant, The Corruption of Civil Rights and Civil Law.
    The effects of the late civil strife have been to free the slave and make him a citizen. Yet he is not possessed of the civil rights which citizenship should carry with it. This is wrong, and should be corrected. To this correction I stand committed, so far as Executive influence can avail.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  1
    William C. Hine (1992). South Carolina's Challenge to Civil Rights: The Case of South Carolina State College, 1945–1954. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 9 (1):38-50.
    South Carolina State College was founded in 1896. As one of the Black institutions taking advantage of the Second Morrill Act of 1890, a large portion of the college's limited financial resources, its energies, and its programs were devoted to training students in agriculture, home economics, vocational trades, and in the education of teachers. These curriculums were considered appropriate for young Black men and women in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.When the civil rights movement (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  2
    Robert K. Fullinwider & Claudia Mills (1986). The Moral Foundations of Civil Rights. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    More than two decades after the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the issues of racial discrimination and affirmative action are still matters of controversy. The fragile national consensus on civil rights policy has been increasingly fragmented by resistance and confusion in recent years, especially under the impact of the Reagan administration's efforts to change its direction dramatically. Similarly, since the mid-1960s, the women's rights movement has worked to end discrimination and bring about (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Paul Gottfried (1996). On the Civil Rights Movement: Reply to Murray. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1996 (106):139-142.
    Hugh Murray's comments on the civil rights movement recall Marge Schott's badly received observations on the Nazi regime. Murray is also describing something that turned out badly but which he insists began well. Contrary to Murray and Dinesh D'Souza, whose book he reviews, the continuities of the Civil Rights Movement and affirmative action policies are more significant than its alleged turning points. Affirmative action as a practice goes back to the last year (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  2
    Bradley C. S. Watson (1999). Civil Rights and the Paradox of Liberal Democracy. Lexington Books.
    In Civil Rights and the Paradox of Liberal Democracy, Bradley Watson demonstrates the paradox of liberal democracy: that its cornerstone principles of equality and freedom are principles inherently directed toward undermining it. Modernity, beyond bringing definition to political equality, unleashed a whirlwind of individualism, which feeds the soul's basic impulse to rule without limitationincluding the limitation of consent. Here Watson begins his analysis of the foundations of liberalism, looking carefully and critically at the moral and political (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Harold D. Guither (1998). Animal Rights: History and Scope of a Radical Social Movement. Southern Illinois University Press.
    In the past decade, philosopher Bernard Rollin points out, we have "witnessed a major revolution in social concern with animal welfare and the moral status of animals." Adopting the stance of a moderate, Harold Guither attempts to provide an unbiased examination of the paths and goals of the members of the animal rights movement and of its detractors. Given the level of confusion, suspicion, misunderstanding, and mistrust between the two sides, Guither admits the difficulty in locating, much less staying (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34.  3
    Anita Silvers & Leslie Francis (2013). Human Rights, Civil Rights: Prescribing Disability Discrimination Prevention in Packaging Essential Health Benefits. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 41 (4):781-791.
    This article explores rights-based approaches to protecting disabled people against inequities in access to health care services. Understanding health care as a human right, as is found in the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities (CRPD), fails to provide theoretical machinery for responding to certain pressing challenges. An alternative account, understanding health care as a civil right, proves more promising. This latter approach then is applied to the right to health care (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Paul Smith (1996). Feminism and the Third Republic Women's Political and Civil Rights in France, 1918-1945. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  36. Paul Smith (1992). Women's Political and Civil Rights in the French Third Republic, 1918-1940.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  3
    Jo Van Cauter (forthcoming). Wisdom as a Meditation on Life: Spinoza on Bacon and Civil History. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    In letter 37 to Johannes Bouwmeester, Spinoza identifies a historiola mentis à la Bacon as an important tool for distinguishing more easily between adequate and inadequate ideas. This paper contends that Spinoza's advice is to take into account Baconian-style ‘Civil History’ as providing instructive material for contemplating the variety, complexity, and persistency of human passionate behaviour. Specifically, it argues that Baconian civil history forms an integral part of Spinoza's reflections on provisional morality. Although for Spinoza, philosophical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  1
    Christopher J. Finlay (2006). Rhetoric and Citizenship in Adam Ferguson's Essay on the History of Civil Society. History of Political Thought 27 (1):27-49.
    There is a tension apparent in Adam Ferguson's Essay on the History of Civil Society between his naturalistic account of the history of societies as emanating from principles of human nature on the one hand, and on the other, the rhetorically charged moralism that readers have generally noted in his critique of contemporary polished and commercial societies. This is related in the article to questions about the appropriate relationship between forms of rhetoric and the writing of moral (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  4
    Antoon de Baets (2009). The Impact of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on the Study of History. History and Theory 48 (1):20-43.
    There is perhaps no text with a broader impact on our lives than the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights . It is strange, therefore, that historians have paid so little attention to the UDHR. I argue that its potential impact on the study of history is profound. After asking whether the UDHR contains a general view of history, I address the consequences of the UDHR for the rights and duties of historians, and explain how it (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  2
    M. Hickford (2006). 'Decidedly the Most Interesting Savages on the Globe': An Approach to the Intellectual History of Maori Property Rights, 1837-53. History of Political Thought 27 (1):122-167.
    This article contends that the intellectual history of developing British imperial policy towards indigenous peoples' property rights to land in the mid-nineteenth century is best approached through seeing policy as made in the context of two intellectual vocabularies that were conjoined: the stadial theory of history and the law of nations. New Zealand provides an example of these languages in contestable play between the 1830s and 1853 at a time when the expanding British Empire as a whole (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  8
    Lena Halldenius, On the Use and Abuse of History in Philosophy of Human Rights.
    History plays an important role in the philosophy of human rights, more so than in philosophical discussions on related concepts, such as justice. History tends to be used in order to make it credible that there is a tradition of rights as a moral idea, or an ethical ideal, that transcends national boundaries. In the example that I investigate in this chapter, this moral idea is tightly spun around the moral dignity of the human person. There (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  7
    Kevin Anderson (2012). The Lost Promise of Civil Rights by Risa L. Goluboff. Human Rights Review 13 (1):129-130.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  6
    Alan Jenkins (1999). Civil Rights and Social Wrongs: Black-White Relations Since World War II. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 1 (1):120-123.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  4
    Jennifer McErlean (2005). Civil Rights and the Abortion Debate. Think 3 (9):27-32.
    Do fetuses have rights, including a right to life?
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  1
    J. Alberto del Real Alcalá (2014). The New Civil Rights of the Person. Archiv Fuer Rechts- Und Sozialphilosphie 100 (4):527-538.
    The Constitutional State, in its initial configuration as a liberal Constitutional State, recognised a series of basic individual rights as fundamental rights. Subsequently, in the second half of the 20 th century, social, economic and cultural rights were integrated into the Constitution, creating the social Constitutional State. However, although said group of rights are always mentioned as a compact group, or a package of rights, in fact the second recognition only (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  2
    Patricia Roberts-Miller (2013). Jewish Identity and Civil Rights in America by Kenneth L. Marcus. Human Rights Review 14 (3):291-292.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  1
    Ding Zilin, Lin Mu, Jiang Qisheng & Jiang Peikun (2001). Declaration on Civil Rights and Freedoms (1998). In Stephen C. Angle & Marina Svensson (eds.), Chinese Human Rights Reader. M. E. Sharpe
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  6
    Raf Geenens (2008). Democracy, Human Rights and History Reading Lefort. European Journal of Political Theory 7 (3):269-286.
    This article offers an overview of the French political philosopher Claude Lefort's oeuvre, arguing that his work should be read as a normative or even universalist justification of democracy and human rights. The notion of history plays a crucial notion in this enterprise, as Lefort demonstrates that there is an ineluctable 'historical' or 'political' condition of human coexistence, a condition that can only be properly accommodated in a regime of democracy and human rights. This reading of Lefort (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49.  4
    Mary Brabeck, Maureen Kenny, Sonia Stryker, Terry Tollefson & Margot Sternstrom (1994). Human Rights Education Through the 'Facing History and Ourselves' Program. Journal of Moral Education 23 (3):333-347.
    Abstract This study examined the effects of the Facing History and Ourselves (FHAO) human rights program on moral development and psychological functioning. The FHAO curriculum significantly increased 8th grade students? moral reasoning (Rest's 1979 Defining Issues Test) without adversely impacting on their psychological well?being (scores on depression, hopelessness or self?worth inventories). Girls were more empathic and had higher levels of social interest; boys had higher global self?worth scores; there were no differences between boys and girls in their moral (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  50.  4
    Abraham Magendzo & María Isabel Toledo (2009). Moral Dilemmas in Teaching Recent History Related to the Violation of Human Rights in Chile. Journal of Moral Education 38 (4):445-465.
    This article reviews the moral dilemmas that a teacher faces in the classroom when teaching recent history which deals with military regimes, violation of human rights and the transition to democracy in Chile . Furthermore, it explores the neutrality of the content taught; the ideological standpoints of the teachers and the students; emotions that emerge; relationships with the victims and so on. These tensions were noted during research undertaken in secondary schools in Santiago, Chile, in 2007. Introducing recent (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000