Search results for 'Civil society' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Randall D. Germain & Michael Kenny (eds.) (2005). The Idea of Global Civil Society: Politics and Ethics in a Globalizing Era. Routledge.score: 105.0
    This book evaluates the claim that in order to explore the changing social foundations of global power relations today, we need to include in our analysis an understanding of global civil society, particularly if we also wish to raise ethical questions about the changing political and institutional practices of transnational governance. The authors engage directly with the notion of global civil society in order to examines the ethical, social, and political conditions that make certain kinds of (...)
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  2. Michael Kenny & Randall Germain (2005). The Idea(L) of Global Civil Society. In Randall D. Germain & Michael Kenny (eds.), The Idea of Global Civil Society: Politics and Ethics in a Globalizing Era. Routledge.score: 105.0
    This book evaluates the claim that in order to explore the changing social foundations of global power relations today, we need to include in our analysis an understanding of global civil society, particularly if we also wish to raise ethical questions about the changing political and institutional practices of transnational governance. The authors engage directly with the notion of global civil society in order to examines the ethical, social, and political conditions that make certain kinds of (...)
     
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  3. Aldo de Moor (2010). Reconstructing Civil Society with Intermedia Communities. AI and Society 25 (3):279-289.score: 93.0
    A healthy civil society is essential in order to deal with “wicked” societal problems. Merely involving institutional actors and mass media is not sufficient. Intermedia can play a crucial complementary role in strengthening civil society. However, the potential of these technologies needs to be carefully tailored to the requirements and constraints of the communities grown around them. The GRASS system for group report authoring is one carefully tailored socio-technical system aimed at unlocking this potential. Such systems (...)
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  4. Sung Ho Kim (2004). Max Weber's Politics of Civil Society. Cambridge University Press.score: 90.0
    This book is an in-depth interpretation of Max Weber as a political theorist of civil society. On the one hand, it reads Weber's ideas from the perspective of modern political thought, rather than the modern social sciences; on the other, it offers a liberal assessment of this complex political thinker without attempting to apologize for his shortcomings. Through a fresh reading of Weber's religious, epistemological and political writings, the book shows Weber's concern with public citizenship in a modern (...)
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  5. Christopher L. Pallas (2010). Revolutionary, Advocate, Agent, or Authority: Context-Based Assessment of the Democratic Legitimacy of Transnational Civil Society Actors. Ethics and Global Politics 3 (3).score: 90.0
    The literature on transnational civil society encompasses a number of conflicting views regarding civil society organizations’ (CSOs) behavior and impacts and the desirability of civil society involvement in international policymaking. This piece suggests that this lack of consensus arises from the diverse range of contexts in which CSOs operate and the wide variety of activities in which it engages. This article seeks to organize and analyze the disparate data on civil society by (...)
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  6. Johannes Michael Schnarrer (2010). The Civil Society Between Freedom and Democracy. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (8):4-12.score: 90.0
    In view of a rapid succession of events in the contemporary world, on both the political and the scientific levels, it is indeed essential to say more about the subject of democracy in the civil society. If by democracy we mean not only a form of govern- ment but also a system of living, then indeed a unanimous judgment and also a general conception cannot be expected, but nevertheless the concept need not to be debased to the stage (...)
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  7. J. P. Zompetti (2006). The Role of Advocacy in Civil Society. Argumentation 20 (2):167-183.score: 90.0
    The concept of civil society has once again emerged as a viable mechanism for developing and sustaining deliberative democracy. However, an essential component of many strategies to sustain civil society appears lacking, especially when we see the growing cynicism and apathy among citizens. What is missing is a strategy for training or encouraging citizens to participate more fully in civil society. The skills of advocacy can, at least in part, help renew civic activism. Thus, (...)
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  8. Kristina Miliauskaitė & Gintaras Šapoka (2009). Civil Society as the Guarantee of Existence of the Legal State: Experience of Lithuania in 1918-1940. Jurisprudence 115 (1):183-198.score: 90.0
    The paper deals with mutual conditionality of existence between the civil society and legal state. The paper is based on the 1918-1940 doctrine of independent Lithuania, the models of the legal state and the tentative models of the civil society created at that time. In the first part of the article, the concept of the legal state is discussed. In terms of creation of the model of the legal state, M. Romeris works are of exceptional importance. (...)
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  9. Kathleen A. Tobin (2010). Whose Civil Society?: The Politicization of Religion in Transitional Cuba. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (8):76-89.score: 90.0
    For decades, the United States has supported the development of civil society in various places around the world. Promoted as integral to democracy, civil society projects have come to include religion and religious freedom as significant components. U.S. experts point to tolerance of all faiths and the presence of voluntary religious association as essential checks to state power and necessary to a free society. Because of its unique relationship with Cuba, the United States support of (...)
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  10. Daniel Arenas, Pablo Sanchez & Matthew Murphy (2013). Different Paths to Collaboration Between Businesses and Civil Society and the Role of Third Parties. Journal of Business Ethics 115 (4):723-739.score: 90.0
    In this article, we suggest that one of the unexplored paths toward collaboration between firms and civil society organizations starts with confrontation or potential conflict, and that the transition toward collaboration can be further understood if one focuses on triadic relationships rather than dyadic ones. We analyze the presence of third parties and their different roles to explain how collaboration is facilitated. The article aims at bringing together the bodies of research on business–civil society confrontation and (...)
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  11. Stamatopoulos Dimitrios (2010). The Return of Religious and Historiographic Discourse:Church and Civil Society in Southeastern Europe (19th - 20th Centuries). [REVIEW] Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (8):64-75.score: 90.0
    This paper focuses on the revision of the classical thesis concerning secularism the progressive domination of the discussion around the issue of the civil society. These two poles facilitated the development of a series of historiographic approaches that particularly touched on the areas of Eastern and Southeastern Europeís history. Here we are concerned with three central cases of historiographic discourseís production, as indicators of the dominant ìparadigmîís change: the first concerns the role of the Russian church in the (...)
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  12. Mihai Pascaru & Calina Ana Butiu (2010). Civil Society, Public Participation, and Religious Affiliation. Exploratory Investigations in the Livezile-Rimetea Area (Apuseni Mountains, Romania). Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 8 (22):150-170.score: 90.0
    The present work approaches a series of wide exploratory investigations in the Romanian rural area, most recently in Livezile-Rimetea micro-region (Apuseni Mountains). Within the civil society and public participation debate context, the study focuses on the variable of religious affiliation (orthodox, non-orthodox), which differentiates the real potential public participation at the population level in the studied area. The immediate conclusion to be drawn is that in the differences in religious affiliation induce variations in expressing the civic activism and (...)
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  13. Carlo Ruzza (2013). Civil Society Actors and EU Fundamental Rights Policy: Opportunities and Challenges. Human Rights Review:1-17.score: 90.0
    This paper examines how civil society actors in the EU utilize the political and legal opportunities provided by the EU’s fundamental rights policy to mobilize against discrimination, notably racism, and xenophobia. It emphasizes the multiple enabling roles that this policy provides to civil society associations engaged in judicial activism, political advocacy, and service delivery both at the EU and Member State levels, and assesses their effectiveness. It describes several factors that hinder the implementation of EU fundamental (...)
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  14. Luke Wilcox (2010). Secularists and Islamists in Morocco: Prospects for Building Trust and Civil Society Through Human Rights Reform. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (20):3-25.score: 90.0
    In Morocco’s process of liberalization (and democratization), the dynamics between social actors defining themselves as “secular” and those labeled “Islamist” are critical. This paper probes the possibility of these actors transcending their frequent opposition and building mutual trust and “civil” interaction, thereby strengthening civil society and the possibility of continued reform in Morocco. Using Morocco’s recent Equity and Reconciliation Commission as an analytical tool, the paper focuses on the human rights arena as a potentially fruitful place for (...)
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  15. Rory J. Conces (2007). The Role of the Hyperintellectual in Civil Society Building and Democratization in the BALKans. Studies in East European Thought 59 (3):195 - 214.score: 82.0
    Although intellectuals have been a part of the cultural landscape, it is in post-conflict societies, such as those found in Kosovo and Bosnia, that there has arisen a need for an intellectual who is more than simply a social critic, an educator, a man of action, and a compassionate individual. Enter the hyperintellectual. As this essay will make clear, it is the hyperintellectual, who through a reciprocating critique and defense of both the nationalist enterprise and strong interventionism of the International (...)
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  16. Z. A. Pelczynski (ed.) (1984). The State and Civil Society: Studies in Hegel's Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 75.0
    The essays in this volume, focus on this distinction in their consideration of Hegel's political philosophy - his attempted (re)construction of modern ethical ...
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  17. Evert Van der Zweerde (1996). Civil Society and Ideology: A Matter of Freedom. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 48 (2-4):171-205.score: 75.0
  18. Pedro Alexis Tabensky (2007). Young, Mark A., Negotiating the Good Life: Aristotleand the Civil Society. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (1):105-107.score: 75.0
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  19. Cãtãlin Vasile Bobb (2010). Mircea Flonta, Hans-Klaus Keul si Jorn Rusen (coord.), Religia si societatea civilã/ Religion and civil society. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 4 (12):133-134.score: 75.0
    Mircea Flonta, Hans-Klaus Keul si Jorn Rusen (coord.), Religia si societatea civilã Ed. Paralela 45, Pitesti, 2005.
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  20. Jonathan Chaplin (2010). Herman Dooyeweerd: Christian Philosopher of State and Civil Society. University of Notre Dame Press.score: 75.0
  21. Daniela-Luminita Constantin, Zizi Goschin & Mariana Dragusin (2010). Ethnic Entrepreneurship as an Integrating Factor in Civil Society and a Gate to Religious Tolerance: A Spotlight on Turkish Entrepreneurs in Romania. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (20):49-79.score: 75.0
    The main aim of this article is to discuss both the concept of secularism among the Ottoman intellectuals and the principle of secularism during the period of the Turkish Republic based on ideas rather than practice. We can analyze “secularism in Turkey” in two separate periods of time: First, “The Ottoman Empire and Secularism” which discusses the ideas of secularism before the foundation of the Turkish Republic, and second “A Brief Analysis of the Turkish Republic and the Principle of Secularism” (...)
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  22. Xiaohe Lu & Deon Rossouw (eds.) (2007). Zhongguo Jing Ji Fa Zhan Zhong de Zi You Yu Ze Ren: Zheng Fu, Qi Ye Yu Gong Min She Hui = Freedoms and Responsibilities for Business in China: Governments, Corporations, and Civil Society Organizations. Shanghai She Hui Ke Xue Yuan Chu Ban She.score: 75.0
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  23. Víctor Pérez Díaz (1978). State, Bureaucracy, and Civil Society: A Critical Discussion of the Political Theory of Karl Marx. Macmillan.score: 75.0
  24. Ágost Pulszky (1888/1979). The Theory of Law and Civil Society. Hyperion Press.score: 75.0
  25. Davide Torsello (2012). The “Revival” of Civil Society in Central Eastern Europe: New Environmental and Political Movements. Human Affairs 22 (2):178-195.score: 75.0
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  26. Harry J. van Buren Iii & Jeanne M. Logsdon (2006). Stages of Economic Development, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Civil Society. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:170-172.score: 63.0
    This paper begins to examine the question of where societal expectations about the nature of corporate social responsibility come from. In particular, we begin to consider arguments about how a country’s stage of economic development affects the kinds of social responsibility expectations that firms face and then how the nature of a country’s civil society might affect CSR expectations. The factors that should be taken into account for future empirical research are also considered.
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  27. Chet Meeks (2001). Civil Society and the Sexual Politics of Difference. Sociological Theory 19 (3):325-343.score: 60.0
    This paper discusses the sexual politics of anti-normalization within the context of the sociological discussions of civil society and the public sphere. The sexual politics of anti-normalization is less centered around "identity" as a means of securing group solidarity and representing sexual communities in civil society. A politics of anti-normalization comprehends identity as a means of normalizing and regulating sexual desire and difference. Anti-normalization entails the politicization of ethical-moral issues concerning sex and desire and the production (...)
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  28. Chris W. Surprenant (2010). Liberty, Autonomy, and Kant's Civil Society. History of Philosophy Quarterly 27 (1).score: 60.0
    Morality, as Immanuel Kant understands it, depends on the capacity of a person to be the agent and owner of his own actions, not merely a conduit for social and psychological forces and influences over which he has little or no control. As a result, Kant’s moral philosophy focuses primarily on the topic of individual freedom and the necessary preconditions of the possibility of that freedom. In the Groundwork and second Critique, Kant’s discussion of the connection between morality and freedom (...)
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  29. Louis Logister (2007). Global Governance and Civil Society. Some Reflections on NGO Legitimacy. Journal of Global Ethics 3 (2):165 – 179.score: 60.0
    Today civil society groups are important actors on the international stage. Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have taken roles that traditionally have been the sole province of states or intergovernmental institutions. NGOs are not bound to act in the public interest. Neither are their actions justified by formal democratic procedures, as is the case with states. Therefore, questioning the legitimacy of their actions is a crucial thing to do. This article presents the results of empirical research on the legitimacy of (...)
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  30. Patrick M. Jenlink (2007). Globalization and the Evolution of Democratic Civil Society: Democracy as Spatial Discourse. World Futures 63 (5 & 6):386 – 407.score: 60.0
    At its core, the evolution of democratic civil society is a process of transcending existing, historical social space, a process that desires to dissolve "political society" into "civil society" and with it to reformulate space as more democratic, participatory public space, and global spheres of interaction. In this article, the author examines the implications of globalization and the evolution of democratic civil society. Drawing on the work of French theorists de Certeau and Lefebvre, (...)
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  31. Philip Oxhorn (2007). Civil Society Without a State? Transnational Civil Society and the Challenge of Democracy in a Globalizing World. World Futures 63 (5 & 6):324 – 339.score: 60.0
    A concept of civil society that stresses civil society's role in working with the state to achieve more inclusive, democratic polities provides the context for examining the implications for transnational civil society. In particular, the author examines how this perspective emphasizes the importance of the paradox that civil society cannot be understood independently of a relationship to a state. After explaining the nature of this paradox, the author discusses the various ways this (...)
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  32. Alan Thomas, Liberal Republicanism and the Role of Civil Society.score: 60.0
    The political liberalism of Rawls and Larmore is presented as uniquely able to solve the problems of modern political theory. In the face of a plurality of reasonable comprehensive conceptions of the good, a legitimate liberal state can legislate solely on the basis of a modular conception of justice affirmed from within each reasonable conception. However, it is argued that this view, while restrictive, has to permit the promotion of its own pre-conditions. This demanding duty of civic restraint requires citizens (...)
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  33. Eleanor R. E. O’Higgins (2010). Corporations, Civil Society, and Stakeholders: An Organizational Conceptualization. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):157 - 176.score: 60.0
    This article presents a descriptive conceptual framework comprising four different company configurations with respect to orientations toward corporate social responsibility (CSR). The four types are Skeptical, Pragmatic, Engaged, and Idealistic. The framework is grounded in instrumental and normative stakeholder theory, and a company's configuration is based on its instrumental and/or normative stance toward stakeholders. Its configuration indicates what position a company adopts in relation to CSR. This article argues that there is no one formula to fit all companies, descriptively or (...)
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  34. Gary Alan Fine & Brooke Harrington (2004). Tiny Publics: Small Groups and Civil Society. Sociological Theory 22 (3):341-356.score: 60.0
    It has been conventional to conceptualize civic life through one of two core images: the citizen as lone individualist or the citizen as joiner. Drawing on analyses of the historical development of the public sphere, we propose an alternative analytical framework for civic engagement based on small-group interaction. By embracing this micro-level approach, we contribute to the debate on civil society in three ways. By emphasizing local interaction contexts-the microfoundations of civil society-we treat small groups as (...)
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  35. Sungmoon Kim (2010). Beyond Liberal Civil Society: Confucian Familism and Relational Strangership. Philosophy East and West 60 (4):476-498.score: 60.0
    In Conditions of Liberty, Ernest Gellner defines civil society as a unique modern condition in which a "modal self"—a moral agent liberated from "the tyranny of cousins or of rituals"—entertains an unprecedented amount of personal freedom.1 Otherwise stated, moral individualism is the foundation of a modern civil society where people encounter each other qua individuals (i.e., strangers). In line with this view, the predominant, formal-judicial, understanding of civil society in the recent social sciences2 is (...)
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  36. Umut Korkut (2007). Participatory Policy-Making, Participatory Civil Society: A Key for Dissolving Elite Rule in New Democracies in the Era of Globalization. World Futures 63 (5 & 6):340 – 352.score: 60.0
    The author argues that in democracies a strong state and strong civil society are not mutually exclusive. Only a democratic, legitimate, and strong state can provide the environment for civil society activities to flourish; in return, only a strong and a participatory civil society can outline the reach of state strength vis-à-vis the society. The author discusses the need for civil society organizations to collaborate with policy-making institutions, in which they can (...)
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  37. Homas Evartenberg (1981). Poverty and Class Structure in Hegel's Theory of Civil Society. Philosophy and Social Criticism 8 (2):169-182.score: 60.0
    Hegel's handling of the phenomenon of poverty has often been seen as an important virtue of his theory of civil society. In this paper, It is argued that Hegel's discussion of this phenomenon reveals a critical weakness of his theory of civil society, i.e., the failure of his theory to take account of the actual class structure of that society. Hegel's official theory of the classes in civil society is shown to neglect the (...)
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  38. Gideon Baker (2001). Civil Society Theory and Republican Democracy. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (2):59-84.score: 60.0
    Calls to ?build civil society?, ?create active citizenship?, ?empower communities?, or ?widen political participation? are growing by the day. They are heard in academia, the private sector, among NGOs and increasingly in government. In short, the rhetoric of self?government, that ideal dear to republicans, is back on the political agenda. This time, however, it is increasingly tied to the category of civil society. Yet can the programme of ?more power to civil society? really achieve (...)
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  39. David James (2011). Civil Society and Literature: Hegel and Lukács on the Possibility of a Modern Epic. The European Legacy 16 (2):205-221.score: 60.0
    It is claimed that Hegel denies the possibility of a modern epic and that his lectures on aesthetics demand the condemnation of all the art of his own time. I use the available student transcripts of his lectures on aesthetics, in conjunction with Lukács's views on the novel, to show that Hegel suggests that the novel might count as a modern epic and that it may perform a significant function in modern ethical life (Sittlichkeit) as presented in his own philosophy (...)
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  40. Graham Long (2008). Justification and Legitimacy in Global Civil Society. Journal of Global Ethics 4 (1):51 – 66.score: 60.0
    As some thinkers have sought in the concept of global civil society an ethically driven site of deliberation and even resistance, so others have criticized global civil society for its lack of legitimacy and representativeness. This article attempts to answer these criticisms ? at least in part ? by invoking a moral commitment to the value of justification. I argue that the idea of justification, when examined, offers us a particular understanding of legitimacy which would be (...)
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  41. Patrick Jenlink (2002). Education for Civil Society: Evolutionary Guidance and the Democratic Ideal. World Futures 58 (5 & 6):395 – 416.score: 60.0
    This article honors Bela H. Banathy's work in social systems design and acknowledges his intellectual, professional, and humanitarian gifts to the system sciences community. The author examines Banathy's epistemology of conscious self-guided evolution and how it has influenced the author's thinking and research in design of educational systems, and in particular the study of education's role as an evolutionary guidance system for civil society. Specifically, the author examines Banathy's notions of evolutionary guidance systems (EGSs) and the design inquiry (...)
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  42. Frank Schwartz (2002). Civil Society in Japan Reconsidered. Japanese Journal of Political Science 3 (2):195-215.score: 60.0
    When defined broadly, we can proceed on the assumption that in all but the most totalitarian of modern contexts, there is some kind of civil society that can be identified and compared cross-nationally. Although Japan may not strike the casual observer as the most fertile ground for such an investigation, setting bounds to the state and freeing space for plurality have long been key issues for that country. Japan may be the strictest of all advanced industrial democracies in (...)
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  43. Sholomo Avineri (1986). The Paradox of Civil Society in the Structure of Hegel's Views of Sittlichkeit. Philosophy and Theology 1 (2):157-172.score: 60.0
    The way in which much of the conventional interpretation has tried to describe the structure of Hegel’s civil society is inaccurate and one-dimensional. To Hegel civil society is not just the economic marketplace, where every individual tries to maximize his or her enlightened self-interest: side by side with the elements of universal strife and unending clash which are of the nature of civil society, there is another element which strongly limits and inhibits self-interest and (...)
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  44. Rogan Kersh (2000). State Autonomy & Civil Society: The Lobbyist Connection. Critical Review 14 (2-3):237-258.score: 60.0
    Abstract The much?noted decline of ?state autonomy? theories owes partly to external challenges to state power, such as globalization, supranational regimes, and the like. But advanced democratic states have also long been seen as threatened from within, especially by powerful private interest groups. The extent of private?interest influence on policy making depends in important part on corporate lobbyists, a group whose activities are chronicled in this essay. Lobbyists exercise considerably more autonomy from the private clients who hire them than has (...)
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  45. E. Wnuk-Lipinski (2007). Vicissitudes of Ethical Civil Society in Central and Eastern Europe. Studies in Christian Ethics 20 (1):30-43.score: 60.0
    The article focuses on the role of civil society in the aggregate of causes that eventually brought about the collapse of the communist block and — in consequence — changed the global balance of power. The concept of ‘ethical civil society’ is introduced in explaining the path to democracy of former Soviet bloc countries. The article also explores cultural determinants of democratisation in Central and Eastern Europe after 1989; in particular the relation between religious confession and (...)
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  46. Ángel Galindo García (2013). The logic of the gift on the horizon of civil society. Veritas 28 (28):9-40.score: 60.0
    En este artículo el autor analiza la encíclica Caritas in veritate de Benedicto XVI teniendo como clave de lectura el mercado, el Estado y la sociedad civil, los cuales forman una unión osmótica en la que la persona, libre y responsable, puede expresarse en términos de desarrollo integral. El mercado pasa por el contrato, el Estado por las leyes justas y la sociedad civil por el don y la gratuidad. En este contexto, la sociedad civil es esencial (...)
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  47. Michaelle L. Browers (2004). Arab Liberalisms: Translating Civil Society, Prioritising Democracy. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 7 (1):51-75.score: 60.0
    This article examines some of the earliest engagements of Arab thinkers with the now global idea of civil society. It focuses on Arab liberal thinkers who encounter ?civil society? as something that must be interpreted in order to be understood and view ?translation? as part of that process of interpretation. I argue that the ?transition phase? of contestation amidst loosely formulated, partially translated understandings of ?civil society? both proves productive for the transformation and appropriation (...)
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  48. Christopher J. Finlay (2004). Hume's Theory of Civil Society. European Journal of Political Theory 3 (4):369-391.score: 60.0
    This article interprets David Hume’s social and political thought as a ‘theory of civil society’, arguing that as such it constituted an important challenge to the civic humanism of much early 18th-century British political argument. Since republican theorists invoke the historical traditions of civic thought in current debates, Hume’s theory of civil society therefore is of especial interest in relation to the foundations of contemporary neo-republicanism. The first part argues that, in A Treatise of Human Nature, (...)
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  49. Catherine Pickstock (1999). Civil Society and its Discontents. Telos 1999 (115):176-178.score: 60.0
    For a variety of reasons, “civil society” has become a key term in modern political discourse. First, in the West, state control of the economy has gone so much out of fashion that radicals now seek to mitigate the effects of an untrammeled free market by relocating the possibility of peaceful collaboration within a domain that is neither simply that of negotiation between atomic individuals nor that of the central state. Second, in the East, there was a growing (...)
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  50. Peter Wehling (2012). From Invited to Uninvited Participation (and Back?): Rethinking Civil Society Engagement in Technology Assessment and Development. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):43-60.score: 60.0
    In recent years, citizens’ and civil society engagement with science and technology has become almost synonymous with participation in institutionally organized formats of participatory technology assessment (pTA) such as consensus conferences or stakeholder dialogues. Contrary to this view, it is argued in the article that beyond these standardized models of “invited” participation, there exist various forms of “uninvited” and independent civil society engagement, which frequently not only have more significant impact but are profoundly democratically legitimate as (...)
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