384 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Andy Clark [192]Austen Clark [62]Albert C. Clark [47]A. Clark [22]
Alexander Clark [6]Ann Clark [5]A. M. Clark [4]A. C. Clark [4]

Not all matches are shown. Search with initial or firstname to single out others.

See also:
Profile: Andrew Clark
Profile: Alex Clark (University of Montana)
Profile: Althea Clark (Fielding Institute)
Profile: Alan Clark (University of Hertfordshire)
Profile: Annie Clark (Seattle University)
Profile: Allan Clark (none)
  1. Austen Clark, Location, Location, Location.
    Forthcoming in Lana Trick & Don Dedrick (eds.), Cognition, Computation, and Pylyshyn. MIT Press. Presented at the Zenon Pylyshyn Conference (ZenCon), University of Guelph, 1 May 2005.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Austen Clark, Preattentive Precursors to Phenomenal Properties.
    What are the relations between preattentive feature-placing and states of perceptual awareness? For the purposes of this paper, states of "perceptual awareness" are confined to the simplest possible exemplars: states in which one is aware of some aspect of the appearance of something one perceives. Subjective contours are used as an example. Early visual processing seems to employ independent, high-bandwidth, preattentive feature "channels", followed by a selective process that directs selective attention. The mechanisms that yield subjective contours are found very (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Richmond Campbell & Andy Clark, (Moral Epistemology Naturalized.
    Like those famous nations divided by a single tongue, my paper (this volume) and Professor P.M. Churchland's deep and engaging reply offer different spins on a common heritage. The common heritage is, of course, a connectionist vision of the inner neural economy- a vision which depicts that economy in terms of supra-sentential state spaces, vector-to-vector transformations, and the kinds of skillful pattern-recognition routine we share with the bulk of terrestrial intelligent life-forms. That which divides us is, as ever, much harder (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Alexander Clark, Computational Learning Theory and Language Acquisition.
    Computational learning theory explores the limits of learnability. Studying language acquisition from this perspective involves identifying classes of languages that are learnable from the available data, within the limits of time and computational resources available to the learner. Different models of learning can yield radically different learnability results, where these depend on the assumptions of the model about the nature of the learning process, and the data, time, and resources that learners have access to. To the extent that such assumptions (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Andy Clark, Control & Intervention in Complex Adaptive Systems: From Biology to Biogen.
    Markets, companies and various forms of business organizations may all (we have argued) be usefully viewed through the lens of CAS -- the theory of complex adaptive systems. In this chapter, I address one fundamental issue that confronts both the theoretician and the business manager: the nature and opportunities for control and intervention in complex adaptive regimes. The problem is obvious enough. A complex adaptive system, as we have defined it, is soft assembled and largely self-organizing. This means that it (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Andy Clark, Commentary on "the Modularity of Dynamic Systems".
    1. Throughout the paper, and especially in the section called "LISP vs. DST", I worried that there was not enough focus on EXPLANATION. For the real question, it seems to me, is not whether some dynamical system can implement human cognition, but whether the dynamical description of the system is more explanatorily potent than a computational/representational one. Thus we know, for example, that a purely physical specification can fix a system capable of computing any LISP function. But from this it (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Andy Clark, External Structure.
    Much work in economics, the social sciences, and elsewhere takes as its starting point a somewhat unrealistic conception of rationality — a conception that ignores or downplays both the temporal and the situated aspects of human reason. Biological reason, I shall argue, is better conceived as an iterated process of adaptive response made under extreme time pressure and exquisitely keyed to a variety of external structures and circumstances. These external structures and circumstances act as filters and constraints on the spaces (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Andy Clark, Grand Illusion.
    We seem, or so it seems to some theorists, to experience a rich stream of highly detailed information concerning an extensive part of our current visual surroundings. But this appearance, it has been suggested, is in some way illusory. Our brains do not command richly detailed internal models of the current scene. Our seeings, it seems, are not all that they seem. This, then, is the Grand Illusion. We think we see much more than we actually do. In this paper (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Austen Clark, Comments on Bill Lycan, "More Layers of Perceptual Content&Quot.
    I'm very happy here to be sandwiched between Lycan and Millikan, two of the living philosophers from whom I've probably learned the most, and to whom I am the most grateful. Plus the intermediary position is appropriate for someone commenting on intermediary representations in vision. There's much to like in Bill's account of "layering" in visual representation. For one, it makes explicit and publicizes the notion that there are multiple layers of representation involved even in the seemingly simple achievement (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Austen Clark & Manchester Hall, Attention & Inscrutability.
    We assemble here in this time and place to discuss the thesis that conscious attention can provide knowledge of reference of perceptual demonstratives. I shall focus my commentary on what this claim means, and on the main argument for it found in the first five chapters of Reference and Consciousness. The middle term of that argument is an account of what attention does: what its job or function is. There is much that is admirable in this account, and I am (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Austen Clark & Manchester Hall, March 2004.
    We assemble here in this time and place to discuss the thesis that conscious attention can provide knowledge of reference of perceptual demonstratives. I shall focus my commentary on what this claim means, and on the main argument for it found in the first five chapters of Reference and Consciousness. The middle term of that argument is an account of what attention does: what its job or function is. There is much that is admirable in this account, and I am (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Austen Clark & Manchester Hall, Vicissitudes of Consciousness, Varieties of Correlates.
    If, as Ned Block has argued, consciousness is a mongrel concept, then this collection resembles nothing so much as a visit to a dog pound, where one can hear all the varieties baying, at full volume. The experience is one of immersion in a voluminous excited cacophony, with much yipping and barking, some deep-throated growling, and other voices that can only be characterized as howling at the moon. What a time to be conscious! What a time to be conscious of (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Gianluca Giorgolo, Shalom Lappin & Alexander Clark, Towards a Statistical Model of Grammaticality.
    The question of whether it is possible to characterise grammatical knowledge in probabilistic terms is central to determining the relationship of linguistic representation to other cognitive domains. We present a statistical model of grammaticality which maps the probabilities of a statistical model for sentences in parts of the British National Corpus (BNC) into grammaticality scores, using various functions of the parameters of the model. We test this approach with a classifier on test sets containing different levels of syntactic infelicity. With (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Alex Clark & Shalom Lappin, Unsupervised Learning and Grammar Induction.
    In this chapter we consider unsupervised learning from two perspectives. First, we briefly look at its advantages and disadvantages as an engineering technique applied to large corpora in natural language processing. While supervised learning generally achieves greater accuracy with less data, unsupervised learning offers significant savings in the intensive labour required for annotating text. Second, we discuss the possible relevance of unsupervised learning to debates on the cognitive basis of human language acquisition. In this context we explore the implications of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Alexander Clark & Shalom Lappin, Another Look at Indirect Negative Evidence.
    Indirect negative evidence is clearly an important way for learners to constrain overgeneralisation, and yet a good learning theoretic analysis has yet to be provided for this, whether in a PAC or a probabilistic identification in the limit framework. In this paper we suggest a theoretical analysis of indirect negative evidence that allows the presence of ungrammatical strings in the input and also accounts for the relationship between grammaticality/acceptability and probability. Given independently justified assumptions about lower bounds on the probabilities (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Andy Clark, Connectionism, Nonconceptual Content, and Representational Redescription.
  17. Andy Clark, Embodiment: From Fish to Fantasy.
    The last ten years have seen an increasing interest, within cognitive science, in issues concerning the physical body, the local environment, and the complex interplay between neural systems and the wider world in which they function. “Physically embodied, environmentally embedded” approaches thus loom large on the contemporary cognitive scientific scene. Yet many unanswered questions remain, and the shape of a genuinely embodied, embedded science of the mind is still unclear. I begin by sketching a few examples of the approach, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Andy Clark, Philosophical Issues in Brain Theory.
    The first question concerns a fundamental assumption of most researchers who theorize about the brain. Do neural systems exploit classical compositional and systematic representations, distributed representations, or no representations at all? The question is not easily answered. Connectionism, for example, has been criticised for both holding and challenging representational views. The second quesútion concerns the crucial methodological issue of how results emerging from the various brain sciences can help to constrain cognitive scientific models. Finally, the third question focuses attention on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Andy Clark, Proof Only.
    Beer’s (2003) paper is a tour de force of detailed comments on the more general notion of “situated- dynamical modeling, and provides a concrete sample ness”, Beer suggests that “on this view, situated action of the kinds of understanding dynamicists may realis- is the fundamental concern and cognition is … one tically hope to achieve. The analysis is thus, as Beer resource among many that can be brought to bear as an states, a “tool for building intuition”, and in this (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Austen Clark, How Do Feature Maps Represent?
    Three different ways to understand the representational content of the feature maps employed in early vision are compared. First is Stephen Kosslyn's claim, entered as part of the debate over mental imagery, that such areas support "depictive" representation, and that visual perception uses them as depictive representations. Reasons are given to doubt this view. Second, an improved version of what I call "feature-placing" is described and advanced. Third, feature-placing is contrasted with the notion that the representational content of those feature (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Austen Clark, Inversions Spectral and Bright.
    Spectrum inversion is a thought experiment, and I would wager that there is no better diagnostic test to the disciplinary affiliation of a randomly selected member of the audience than your reaction to a thought experiment. It is a litmus test. If you find that you are paying close attention, subvocalizing objections, and that your heart-rate and metabolism go up, you have turned pink: you are a philosopher. If on the other hand the thought experiment leaves you cold, and you (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Austen Clark, Perception Preattentive and Phenomenal.
    Recent work in experimental psychology and neuroscience has revealed a rather surprising architecture for early (or preattentive) perceptual processes. This paper will describe some of the surprising features of that architecture, and how they bear on recent philosophical debates about the notion of phenomenal consciousness. I will argue that the common sense idea that states of phenomenal consciousness are states of a unitary kind cannot survive confrontation with the details of how our early perceptual processing works. In particular, that architecture (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Austen Clark, Review of Martha Farah, Visual Agnosia. [REVIEW]
    Common sense says that visual agnosia is impossible. It ought not exist. If an object like a safety pin or a bar of white soap is in full view, you see it, and you know what a "safety pin" or a "bar of soap" is, then you cannot fail to recognize what you see. If you identify the safety pin as "something silver and shiny like a watch or a nail clipper," or you identify the bar of white soap as (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Austen Clark, Reductionism & Subjectivism Defined & Defended.
    As a reductionist and a subjectivist I find little to dispute, and much to cheer, in the use of the comparative argument against objectivism. The best available form of objectivism is anthropocentric realism, and at the very least the comparative argument dispels much of the..
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. A. Clark & C. Thornton (forthcoming). Trading Spaces: Connectionism and the Limits of Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Alfred Clark (forthcoming). Medieval Arab Navigation on the Indian Ocean: Latitude Determinations. Journal of the American Oriental Society.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Anna F. Clark (forthcoming). Nasica and Fides. Classical Quarterly.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Austen Clark (forthcoming). Vicissitudes of Consciousness, Varieties of Correlates: Review of The Neural Correlates of Consciousness: Empirical and Conceptual Questions. [REVIEW] American Journal of Psychology.
    and denotes a number of different phenomena. We reason about “consciousness” using some premises that apply to one of the..
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Kiverstein Julian, Mirko Farina & Andy Clark, The Extended Mind Thesis. Oxford Bibliographies Online.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Julian Kiverstein, Mirko Farina & Andy Clark (forthcoming). Substituting the Senses. In Mohan Matthen (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford University Press.
    Sensory substitution devices are a type of sensory prosthesis that (typically) convert visual stimuli transduced by a camera into tactile or auditory stimulation. They are designed to be used by people with impaired vision so that they can recover some of the functions normally subserved by vision. In this chapter we will consider what philosophers might learn about the nature of the senses from the neuroscience of sensory substitution. We will show how sensory substitution devices work by exploiting the cross-modal (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Martin J. Pickering & Andy Clark (forthcoming). Getting Ahead: Forward Models and Their Place in Cognitive Architecture. Trends in Cognitive Sciences.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Alex Rosenberg & Andrew Jh Clark (forthcoming). La genetique et le holisme debride. Revue Internationale de Philosophie.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Alexandra A. Choby & Alexander M. Clark (2013). Improving Health: Structure and Agency in Health Interventions. Nursing Philosophy 15 (2):89-101.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Adam Clark (2013). The Paradox of Disability: Responses to Jean Vanier and L'Arche Communities From Theology and the Sciences Ed. By Hans S. Reinders. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 33 (2):205-208.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Alexander Clark & Shalom Lappin (2013). Complexity in Language Acquisition. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (1):89-110.
    Learning theory has frequently been applied to language acquisition, but discussion has largely focused on information theoretic problems—in particular on the absence of direct negative evidence. Such arguments typically neglect the probabilistic nature of cognition and learning in general. We argue first that these arguments, and analyses based on them, suffer from a major flaw: they systematically conflate the hypothesis class and the learnable concept class. As a result, they do not allow one to draw significant conclusions about the learner. (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Andy Clark (2013). Are We Predictive Engines? Perils, Prospects, and the Puzzle of the Porous Perceiver. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (3):233-253.
    The target article sketched and explored a mechanism (action-oriented predictive processing) most plausibly associated with core forms of cortical processing. In assessing the attractions and pitfalls of the proposal we should keep that element distinct from larger, though interlocking, issues concerning the nature of adaptive organization in general.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Andy Clark (2013). The Many Faces of Precision (Replies to Commentaries on “Whatever Next? Neural Prediction, Situated Agents, and the Future of Cognitive Science”). Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    An appreciation of the many roles of ‘precision-weighting’ (upping the gain on select populations of prediction error units) opens the door to better accounts of planning and ‘offline simulation’, makes suggestive contact with large bodies of work on embodied and situated cognition, and offers new perspectives on the ‘active brain’. Combined with the complex affordances of language and culture, and operating against the essential backdrop of a variety of more biologically basic ploys and stratagems, the result is a maximally context-sensitive, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Andy Clark (2013). Whatever Next? Predictive Brains, Situated Agents, and the Future of Cognitive Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (3):181-204.
    Brains, it has recently been argued, are essentially prediction machines. They are bundles of cells that support perception and action by constantly attempting to match incoming sensory inputs with top-down expectations or predictions. This is achieved using a hierarchical generative model that aims to minimize prediction error within a bidirectional cascade of cortical processing. Such accounts offer a unifying model of perception and action, illuminate the functional role of attention, and may neatly capture the special contribution of cortical processing to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Andy Clark, Julian Kiverstein & Tillmann Vierkant (eds.) (2013). Decomposing the Will. OUP USA.
    There is growing evidence from the science of human behavior that our everyday, folk understanding of ourselves as conscious, rational, responsible agents may be mistaken. The new essays in this volume display and explore this radical claim. folk concept of the responsible agent after abandoning the image of a central executive and "decomposing" the notion of the conscious will into multiple interlocking aspects and functions.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Elizabeth Rous & Andrew Clark (2013). Thinking Without Knowing – Child Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy in the UK and Evidence‐Based Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (4):573-578.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Jan E. Angus & Alexander M. Clark (2012). Using Critical Realism in Nursing and Health Research: Promise and Challenges. Nursing Inquiry 19 (1):1-3.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Andy Clark (2012). Dreaming the Whole Cat: Generative Models, Predictive Processing, and the Enactivist Conception of Perceptual Experience. Mind 121 (483):753-771.
    Does the material basis of conscious experience extend beyond the boundaries of the brain and central nervous system? In Clark 2009 I reviewed a number of ‘enactivist’ arguments for such a view and found none of them compelling. Ward (2012) rejects my analysis on the grounds that the enactivist deploys an essentially world-involving concept of experience that transforms the argumentative landscape in a way that makes the enactivist conclusion inescapable. I present an alternative (prediction-and-generative-model-based) account that neatly accommodates all the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Andy Clark (2012). Embodied, Embedded, and Extended Cognition. In Keith Frankish & William Ramsey (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Cognitive Science. Cambridge University Press. 275.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Andy Clark (2012). How to Qualify for a Cognitive Upgrade: Executive Control, Glass Ceilings and the Limits of Simian Success. In David McFarland, Keith Stenning & Maggie McGonigle (eds.), The Complex Mind. Palgrave Macmillan. 197.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Andy Clark, Duncan Pritchard & Krist Vaesen (2012). Extended Cognition and Epistemology. Philosophical Explorations 15 (2):87 - 90.
    Philosophical Explorations, Volume 15, Issue 2, Page 87-90, June 2012.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Austen Clark (2012). Spatial Organization and the Appearances Thereof in Early Vision. In Gary Hatfield & Sarah Allred (eds.), Visual Experience: Sensation, Cognition, and Constancy. Oup Oxford. 135.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Lori Harwood & Alexander M. Clark (2012). Understanding Health Decisions Using Critical Realism: Home-Dialysis Decision-Making During Chronic Kidney Disease. Nursing Inquiry 19 (1):29-38.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Wendy Sword, Alexander M. Clark, Kathleen Hegadoren, Sandra Brooks & Dawn Kingston (2012). The Complexity of Postpartum Mental Health and Illness: A Critical Realist Study. Nursing Inquiry 19 (1):51-62.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. A. Clark (2011). Much Ado About Cognition. Mind 119 (476):1047-1066.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 384