Search results for 'Classical Liberalism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  81
    David Ellerman (2015). Does Classical Liberalism Imply Democracy? Ethics and Global Politics 8.
    There is a fault line running through classical liberalism as to whether or not democratic self-governance is a necessary part of a liberal social order. The democratic and non-democratic strains of classical liberalism are both present today—particularly in America. Many contemporary libertarians and neo-Austrian economists represent the non-democratic strain in their promotion of non-democratic sovereign city-states (startup cities or charter cities). We will take the late James M. Buchanan as a representative of the democratic strain of (...)
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  2.  93
    Matt Zwolinski (2011). Classical Liberalism and the Basic Income. Basic Income Studies 6 (2):1-14.
    This paper provides a brief overview of the relationship between libertarian political theory and the Universal Basic Income (UBI). It distinguishes between different forms of libertarianism and argues that a one form, classical liberalism, is compatible with and provides some grounds of support for UBI. A classical liberal UBI, however, is likely to be much smaller than the sort of UBI defended by those on the political left. And there are both contingent empirical reasons and principled moral (...)
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  3.  51
    Nicolas Maloberti (2011). Government by Choice: Classical Liberalism and the Moral Status of Immigration Barriers. The Independent Review 15 (4):540-561.
    Could we plausibly believe in the fundamental tenets of classical liberalism and, at the same time, support the state’s raising of immigration barriers? The thesis of this paper is that if we accept the main tenets of classical liberalism as essentially correct, we should regard immigration barriers as essentially illegitimate. Considered under ideal conditions, immigration barriers constitute an unjustified infringement on individuals’ ownership rights, since it is difficult to identify a purpose that such an infringement could (...)
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  4.  28
    Nicolas Maloberti (2012). New Approaches to Classical Liberalism. Rationality, Markets and Morals 3:22-50.
    This article focuses on the following three novel and original philosophical approaches to classical liberalism: Den Uyl and Rasmussen’s perfectionist argument from meta-norms, Gaus’s justificatory model, and Kukathas’s conscience-based theory of authority. None of these three approaches are utilitarian or consequentialist in character. Neither do they appeal to the notion of a rational bargain as it is typical within contractarianism. Furthermore, each of these theory rejects the idea that classical liberalism should be grounded on considerations of (...)
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  5.  8
    Michael Stephen Lopato (2014). George H. Smith, The System of Liberty: Themes in the History of Classical Liberalism. Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (1):157-159.
    In The System of Liberty: Themes in the History of Classical Liberalism, George H. Smith focuses his thematic approach regarding the study of classical liberal political philosophy on both natural-rights philosophers, in what Smith deems the “Lockean Paradigm,” and nineteenth-century utilitarian liberals. Smith does not merely provide an overview of the history of this theory—rather, he attempts to discover how and why liberal theory had faced major challenges in the nineteenth-century with regard to both its theoretical foundations (...)
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  6.  6
    Elizabeth Rapaport (2013). Classical Liberalism and Rawlsian Revisionism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 7 (sup1):95-119.
    (1977). Classical Liberalism and Rawlsian Revisionism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 7, Supplementary Volume 3: New Essays on Contract Theory, pp. 95-119.
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  7.  3
    Stephen Dilley (2013). And Classical Liberalism. In Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism: Theories in Tension. Lexington Books 1.
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  8. Stephen Dilley (ed.) (2013). Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism: Theories in Tension. Lexington Books.
    Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism brings together a collection of new essays that examine the multifaceted ferment between Darwinian biology and classical liberalism.
     
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  9. Stephen C. Dilley (ed.) (2013). Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism: Theories in Tension. Lexington Books.
    Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism brings together a collection of new essays that examine the multifaceted ferment between Darwinian biology and classical liberalism.
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  10. Logan Paul Gage, Bruce L. Gordon, Shawn E. Klein, Peter Lawler, Roger Masters, Angus Menuge, Michael J. White, Jay W. Richards, Timothy Sandefur, Richard Weikart, John West & Benjamin Wiker (2013). Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism: Theories in Tension. Lexington Books.
    Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism brings together a collection of new essays that examine the multifaceted ferment between Darwinian biology and classical liberalism.
     
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  11. Jamie Watson (2014). Prolegomena to an Epistemic Case for Classical Liberalism. Libertarian Papers 6.
    The strength of many arguments for Classical Liberalism is often challenged on the grounds that these arguments appeal to controversial metaphysical structures or moral principles. To avoid these challenges, I appeal to a set of epistemic considerations to show that, in order to structure a society that affords optimal opportunity for citizens to obtain their interests, we have a rational obligation to protect individuals’ freedom to pursue those interests. In this paper, I defend the second premise of a (...)
     
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  12.  18
    Lawrence R. Cima & Thomas L. Schubeck (2001). Self-Interest, Love, and Economic Justice: A Dialogue Between Classical Economic Liberalism and Catholic Social Teaching. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (3):213 - 231.
    This essay seeks to start a dialogue between two traditions that historically have interpreted the economy in opposing ways: the individualism of classic economic liberalism (CEL), represented by Adam Smith and Milton Friedman, and the communitarianism of Catholic social teaching (CST), interpreted primarily through the teachings of popes and secondarily the U.S. Catholic bishops. The present authors, an economist and a moral theologian who identify with one or the other of the two traditions, strive to clarify objectively their similarities (...)
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  13. Jason Brennan & John Tomasi (2012). Classical Liberalism. In David Estlund (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press, Usa 115.
  14. Andrew Lister (2013). The Classical Tilt of Justificatory Liberalism. European Journal of Political Theory 12 (3):316-326.
    This paper is a review of Gerald Gaus's The Order of Public Reason. Its initial purpose is to explain how the overall argument of the book is meant to hang together. It also identifies four points at which the argument might be challenged, particularly as it relates to justificatory liberalism’s ‘classical tilt’.
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  15. Chris R. Tame (1998). The Revolution of Reason: Peter Gay, The Enlightenment, and the Ambiguities of Classical Liberalism. Journal of Libertarian Studies 1 (3).
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  16.  5
    Vaughn Bryan Baltzly (2014). 2014 Rockefeller Prize Winner: Four Strikes for Pluralist Liberalism (And Two Cheers for Classical Liberalism). Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (3):315-333.
    Value Pluralism is the view, perhaps most famously associated with Isaiah Berlin, that at its most fundamental level, human value is irreducibly heterogeneous. On this account, rival conceptions of life’s meaning and value – both religious and secular – are thought to represent equally valid, though mutually incompatible, modes of genuine human flourishing. Such divergent values are said to be incommensurable – we cannot compare the worth of one to another, as they do not reduce to any common value, nor (...)
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  17. Deepak Lal (2008). Reviving the Invisible Hand: The Case for Classical Liberalism in the Twenty-First Century. Princeton University Press.
    Reviving the Invisible Hand is an uncompromising call for a global return to a classical liberal economic order, free of interference from governments and international organizations. Arguing for a revival of the invisible hand of free international trade and global capital, eminent economist Deepak Lal vigorously defends the view that statist attempts to ameliorate the impact of markets threaten global economic progress and stability. And in an unusual move, he not only defends globalization economically, but also answers the cultural (...)
     
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  18.  3
    Mark Pennington (2014). Realistic Idealism and Classical Liberalism: EvaluatingFree Market Fairness. Critical Review 26 (3-4):375-407.
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  19.  3
    Gary James Jason (2016). Book Review Of: E. Butler, Classical Liberalism: A Primer. [REVIEW] Philosophia 9:1-9.
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  20. Leonard P. Liggio (1977). Charles Dunoyer and French Classical Liberalism. Journal of Libertarian Studies 1 (3):153-78.
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  21. Andrew Vincent (1990). Classical Liberalism and its Crisis of Identity. History of Political Thought 11 (1):143-161.
     
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  22. David Conway (1996). Classical Liberalism: The Unvanquished Ideal. Philosophy 71 (278):628-631.
     
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  23.  49
    Michael Zuckert (2001). Natural Law, Natural Rights, and Classical Liberalism: On Montesquieu's Critique of Hobbes. Social Philosophy and Policy 18 (1):227-251.
    Montesquieu is not often thought of as a significant natural law thinker. The article on natural law in the International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences discusses many theorists of the natural law, but Montesquieu is not among them. A valuable older survey of natural law theorizing by legal philosopher A. P. d'EntrThomas Aquinas, Hugo Grotius, even Georg Hegel. A yet more comprehensive survey of the topic, Natural Law and Human Dignity, by French philosopher and social theorist Ernst Bloch, does not (...)
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  24. Overton H. Taylor (1962). The Classical Liberalism, Marxism, and the Twentieth Century. Science and Society 26 (3):371-373.
     
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  25.  15
    Daniel J. Smith (2012). Mark Pennington, Robust Political Economy: Classical Liberalism and the Future of Public Policy. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 46 (4):519-522.
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  26.  20
    David Archard (1996). Classical Liberalism: The Unvanquished Ideal by David Conway Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1995, Ix + 150 Pp., £40.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy 71 (278):628-.
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  27.  22
    Frank M. Coleman (2010). Classical Liberalism and American Landscape Representation: The Imperial Self in Nature. Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):75 – 96.
    Here it is shown that 'vacant nature' is deployed as sign in Anglo-American landscape representation of the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries to support a Cartesian imaginary of spatial extension. The referent of this imaginary is variously denoted as 'America' (John Locke), the 'north west' (Jefferson), the 'wilderness' (Ralph Waldo Emerson), and the 'frontier' (Frederick Jackson Turner) but throughout it is essentially the same 'vacant' landscape; its function is to produce a site and space of appearance for an imperial self, an (...)
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  28.  16
    Judith Lee Kissell (1998). Getting Beyond Classical Liberalism: The Human Body and the Property Paradigm. Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (3):279-281.
  29.  2
    James Tully (2009). Ethical Pluralism and Classical Liberalism. In Tracy B. Strong & Richard Madsen (eds.), The Many and the One: Religious and Secular Perspectives on Ethical Pluralism in the Modern World. Princeton University Press 78-86.
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  30.  3
    David Miller (1988). On Classical Liberalism and Libertarianism. Philosophical Books 29 (3):169-170.
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  31.  1
    Barry Stocker (2014). A Comparison of Friedrich Nietzsche and Wilhelm von Humboldt as Products of Classical Liberalism. In Barry Stocker & Manuel Knoll (eds.), Nietzsche as Political Philosopher. De Gruyter 135-154.
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  32.  1
    John Tomasi (2012). Chapter 1. Classical Liberalism. In Free Market Fairness. Princeton University Press 1-26.
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  33. Richard A. Epstein (2003). Skepticism and Freedom a Modern Case for Classical Liberalism. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  34. Gary D. Gd Glenn (1975). Abortion and Inalienable Rights in Classical Liberalism. American Journal of Jurisprudence 20 (1):62.
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  35. Gary James Jason (forthcoming). Eamonn Butler, Classical Liberalism: A Primer. Philosophia:1-9.
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  36. J. C. Lester (2006). In Defence of the Realm: The Place of Nations in Classical Liberalism David Conway. Journal of Libertarian Studies 20 (3):81.
     
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  37. Elizabeth Rapaport (1977). Classical Liberalism and Rawlsian Revisionism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 7 (sup1):95-119.
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  38.  70
    Gerald Gaus (2010). Coercion, Ownership, and the Redistributive State: Justificatory Liberalism's Classical Tilt. Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (1):233.
    Justificatory liberalism1 rests on a conception of members of the public as free and equal. To say that each is free implies that each has a fundamental claim to act as she sees fit on the basis of her own reasoning. To say that each is equal is to insist that members of the public are symmetrically placed insofar as no one has a natural right to command others, nor does anyone have a natural duty to defer to the reasoning (...)
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  39.  26
    Struan Jacobs (1999). Classical and Conservative Liberalism. Tradition and Discovery 26 (1):5-15.
    An extended discussion of Richard Allen’s Beyond Liberalism: The Political Thought of F. A. Hayek & Michael Polanyi in which the book’s prominent themes and arguments are described, and certain inaccuracies and shortcomings noted.
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  40. Jan Narveson (1997). Classical Vs. Modern Liberalism: Advantage, Classical'. In Sirkku Hellsten, Marjaana Kopperi & Olli Loukola (eds.), Taking the Liberal Challenge Seriously: Essays on Contemporary Liberalism at the Turn of the 21st Century. Ashgate 9.
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  41. W. Ver Eecke (1982). Ethics in Economics: From Classical Economics to Neo-Liberalism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 9 (2):146-167.
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  42.  71
    W. Ver Eecke (1982). Ethics in Economics: From Classical Economics to Neo-Liberalism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 9 (2):146-167.
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  43.  21
    Leo Strauss (1959). The Liberalism of Classical Political Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 12 (3):390 - 439.
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  44.  3
    Åsbjørn Melkevik (forthcoming). Four Concepts of Rules: A Theory of Rule Egalitarianism. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885116653366.
    This article outlines the foundations of a nomos-observing theory of social justice, termed ‘rule egalitarianism’, that explains how the seemingly contradictory merger of classical liberalism and social justice is conceivable. The first step towards such a theory consists in ensuring that a concern for the rule of law is etched in the very core of our understanding of social justice, in which case some egalitarian rules will be acceptable from a classical liberal viewpoint. The legal framework of (...)
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  45.  12
    Nicolas Maloberti (2015). Rawls and Bleeding Heart Libertarianism: How Well Do They Mix? The Independent Review 19 (4).
    I argue that Tomasi’s most fundamental “bleeding heart libertarian” insights are not adequately served by Rawls’s lexical framework and his idealized theory of institutional choice. Perhaps paradoxically, using Rawls’s lexical framework to articulate Tomasi’s declared concerns for both economic liberty and “social justice” gives the latter concern very little weight. For that reason, Tomasi’s own objections against classical liberalism would ultimately apply to his own positive contribution as well: the satisfaction of a distributional adequacy condition is secured on (...)
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  46.  34
    Loren Lomasky (2000). Liberty and Welfare Goods: Reflections on Clashing Liberalisms. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 4 (1-2):99-113.
    Among the numerous moral commodities that political orders can produceand protect, classical liberalism assigns primacy to liberty, understoodas noninterference. As the nineteenth century advanced into its secondhalf, this primacy was increasingly seen as myopic. A more defensibleliberalism will devote itself to a wider range of basic human interests:this critique gained virtually unanimous acceptance within the newliberalism. Yet, surprisingly, during the past two decades classicalliberalism seems to have enjoyed a resurrection. This essay arguesthat it is well merited, that the (...)
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  47.  98
    Carol Hay (2012). Consonances Between Liberalism and Pragmatism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (2):141-168.
    This paper is an attempt to identify certain consonances between contemporary liberalism and classical pragmatism. I identify four of the most trenchant criticisms of classical liberalism presented by pragmatist figures such as James, Peirce, Dewey, Addams, and Hocking: that liberalism overemphasizes negative liberty, that it is overly individualistic, that its pluralism is suspect, that it is overly abstract. I then argue that these deficits of liberalism in its historical incarnations are being addressed by contemporary (...)
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  48. Horacio Spector (2007). Autonomy and Rights: The Moral Foundations of Liberalism. Oxford University Press.
    Horacio Spector provides an original and compelling moral justification of classical liberalism. Among the topics he discusses are the concepts of negative and positive freedom, the notion of a moral right, the link between positive freedom and personal autonomy, and the agent-relativity of moral reasons.
     
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  49.  14
    Wim Dubbink & Bert van de Ven (2012). On the Duties of Commission in Commercial Life. A Kantian Criticism of Moral Institutionalism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (2):221-238.
    In latter-day discussions on corporate morality, duties of commission are fiercely debated. Moral institutionalists argue that duties of commission—such as a duty of assistance—overstep the boundaries of moral duty owed by economic agents. “Moral institutionalism” is a newly coined term for a familiar position on market morality. It maintains that market morality ought to be restricted, excluding all duties of commission. Neo-Classical thinkers such as Baumol and Homann defend it most eloquently. They underpin their position with concerns that go (...)
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  50.  79
    Lubomira Radoilska (2009). Public Health Ethics and Liberalism. Public Health Ethics 2 (2):135-145.
    This paper defends a distinctly liberal approach to public health ethics and replies to possible objections. In particular, I look at a set of recent proposals aiming to revise and expand liberalism in light of public health's rationale and epidemiological findings. I argue that they fail to provide a sociologically informed version of liberalism. Instead, they rest on an implicit normative premise about the value of health, which I show to be invalid. I then make explicit the unobvious, (...)
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