Search results for 'Classification of sciences' (try it on Scholar)

999 found
Sort by:
  1. Jaime Nubiola (2005). The Classification of the Sciences and Cross-Disciplinarity. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 41 (2):271-282.score: 571.0
    In a world of ever growing specialization, the idea of a unity of science is commonly discarded, but cooperative work involving cross-disciplinary points of view is encouraged. The aim of this paper is to show with some textual support that Charles S. Peirce not only identified this paradoxical situation a century ago, but he also mapped out some paths for reaching a successful solution. A particular attention is paid to Peirce's classification of the sciences and to his conception (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Roger Ariew (1990). Christopher Clavius and the Classification of Sciences. Synthese 83 (2):293 - 300.score: 537.0
    I discuss two questions: (1) would Duhem have accepted the thesis of the continuity of scientific methodology? and (2) to what extent is the Oxford tradition of classification/subalternation of sciences continuous with early modern science? I argue that Duhem would have been surprised by the claim that scientific methodology is continuous; he expected at best only a continuity of physical theories, which he was trying to isolate from the perpetual fluctuations of methods and metaphysics. I also argue that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Yorick Wilks (1990). Christopher Clavius and the Classification of Sciences. Synthese 83 (2):293-300.score: 537.0
    I discuss two questions: (1) would Duhem have accepted the thesis of the continuity of scientific methodology? and (2) to what extent is the Oxford tradition of classification/subalternation of sciences continuous with early modern science? I argue that Duhem would have been surprised by the claim that scientific methodology is continuous; he expected at best only a continuity of physical theories, which he was trying to isolate from the perpetual fluctuations of methods and metaphysics. I also argue that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Miquel Forcada (2006). Ibn Bajja and the Classification of the Sciences in Al-Andalus. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 16 (2):287-307.score: 531.0
    Coinciding with the scientific flourishing of the 5th / 11th century, which was favoured by the cultural policy of the Andalusi kingdoms ( muluk al-tawa'if ), Abu ‘ Umar ibn ‘ Abd al-Barr, Ibn Hazm and Sa‘ id al-Andalusi all dealt with the classification of the sciences in many works that are already known. Ibn Bajja began his career at the end of this period. In his glosses to al-Farabi’s commentary to the Isagoge he wrote a text on (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Ahti-Veikko Pietarinen (2006). Interdisciplinarity and Peirce's Classification of the Sciences: A Centennial Reassessment. Perspectives on Science 14 (2):127-152.score: 525.0
    : This paper discusses the American scientist and philosopher Charles S. Peirce's (1839–1914) classification of the sciences from the contemporary perspective of interdisciplinary studies. Three theses are defended: (1) Studies on interdisciplinarity pertain to the intermediate class of Peirce's classification of all science, the sciences of review (retrospective science), ranking below the sciences of discovery (heuretic sciences) and above practical science (the arts). (2) Scientific research methods adopted by interdisciplinary inquiries are cross-categorial. Making them (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. John S. Wilkins & Malte C. Ebach (2013). The Nature of Classification: Relationships and Kinds in the Natural Sciences. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 488.0
    The Nature of Classification discusses an old and generally ignored issue in the philosophy of science: natural classification. It argues for classification to be a sometimes theory-free activity in science, and discusses the existence of scientific domains, theory-dependence of observation, the inferential relations of classification and theory, and the nature of the classificatory activity in general. It focuses on biological classification, but extends the discussion to physics, psychiatry, meteorology and other special sciences.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Omar W. Nasim (2012). The Spaces of Knowledge: Bertrand Russell, Logical Construction, and the Classification of the Sciences. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (6):1163-1182.score: 471.0
    What Russell regarded to be the ?chief outcome? of his 1914 Lowell Lectures at Harvard can only be fully appreciated, I argue, if one embeds the outcome back into the ?classificatory problem? that many at the time were heavily engaged in. The problem focused on the place and relationships between the newly formed or recently professionalized disciplines such as psychology, Erkenntnistheorie, physics, logic and philosophy. The prime metaphor used in discussions about the classificatory problem by British philosophers was a spatial (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Joanna Gegotek (2009). Between Physics and History. A Place of Geology in the Classification of Sciences. Filozofia Nauki 17 (2):21.score: 450.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Robert Flint (1904/1975). Philosophy as Scientia Scientiarum: And, a History of Classifications of the Sciences. Arno Press.score: 445.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Helmut Pape (1993). Final Causality in Peirce's Semiotics and His Classification of the Sciences. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 29 (4):581 - 607.score: 444.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Cornelis De Waal (2005). Why Metaphysics Needs Logic and Mathematics Doesn't: Mathematics, Logic, and Metaphysics in Peirce's Classification of the Sciences. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy 41 (2):283-297.score: 444.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. B. Kent & Charles S. Peirce (1997). Logic and the Classification of the Sciences. Kingston and Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1987. LANE, R. Principles of Excluded Middle and Contradiction. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 33 (3):680-703.score: 444.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Andrzej Klawiter (1989). A Contribution to the Classification of Adaptive Relationships/. Standard Formulation of Adaptive Relationship and its Shortcomings The Belief That the Relationships in Biological and Social Worlds Are of a Peculiar Non-Causal Character Appears as a Trademark of Advanced Methodological Reflection on Biological and Social Sciences. As Usual, Its. [REVIEW] In Leszek Nowak (ed.), Dimensions of the Historical Process. Rodopi. 129.score: 444.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. J. M. Long (1886). Classification of the Mathematical Sciences. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 20 (4):417 - 425.score: 444.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. James A. Weisheipl (1965). Classification of the Sciences in Medieval Thought. Mediaeval Studies 27 (1):54-90.score: 435.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. A. E. Taylor (1906). The Place of Psychology in the Classification of the Sciences. Philosophical Review 15 (4):380-386.score: 435.0
  17. Thomas Whittaker (1903). A Compendious Classification of the Sciences. Mind 12 (45):21-34.score: 435.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Maurice de Wulf (1918). The Teaching of Philosophy and the Classification of the Sciences in the Thirteenth Century. Philosophical Review 27 (4):356-373.score: 435.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Vincent Colapietro (1992). Charles S. Peirce: Logic and the Classification of the Sciences Beverley Kent Kingston and Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1987, Selected Bibliography, Index, Xii + 258 P. [REVIEW] Dialogue 31 (01):139-.score: 435.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. H. M. Stanley (1884). On the Classification of the Sciences. Mind 9 (34):265-274.score: 435.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. G. A. Cogswell (1899). The Classification of the Sciences. Philosophical Review 8 (5):494-512.score: 435.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Albert Schinz (1903). A New Classification of the Sciences. The Monist 13 (3):456-463.score: 435.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Maurice De Wulf (1918). The Teaching of Philosophy and the Classification of the Sciences in the Thirteenth Century. Philosophical Review 27 (4):356 - 373.score: 435.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Michael Root & Harold Kincaid (2000). Philosophy of the Social Sciences-Realism and Classification in the Social Sciences-Global Arguments and Local Realism About the Social Sciences. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).score: 425.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Michael Root (2000). Philosophy of the Social Sciences-Realism and Classification in the Social Sciences-Index of Authors. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).score: 425.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Stéphane Schmitt (2009). From Physiology to Classification: Comparative Anatomy and Vicq d'Azyr's Plan of Reform for Life Sciences and Medicine (1774–1794). [REVIEW] Science in Context 22 (2):145.score: 408.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Jerzy A. Wojciechowski (ed.) (1978). Conceptual Basis of the Classification of Knowledge: Proceedings of the Ottawa Conference on the Conceptual Basis of the Classification of Knowledge, Oct. 1st to 5th, 1971 = les Fondements De La Classification des Savoirs: Actes Du Colloque d'Ottawa Sur les Fondements De La Classification des Savoirs Du Ler au 5 Octobre 1971. [REVIEW] K. G. Saur.score: 390.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Jerzy A. Wojciechowski (ed.) (1974). Conceptual Basis of the Classification of Knowledge: Proceedings of the Ottawa Conference on the Conceptual Basis of the Classification of Knowledge, Oct. 1-5, 1971 = les Fondements De La Classification des Savoirs: Actes Du Colloque d'Ottawa Sur les Fondements De La Classification des Savoirs Du Ler au 5 Octobre 1971. [REVIEW] Verlag Dokumentation.score: 390.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Ladislav Tondl (1998). What is the Thematic Structure of Science? Journal for General Philosophy of Science 29 (2):245-264.score: 372.0
    The paper justifies the concept of “thematic structure” or “order of knowledge” over the traditional “classification of sciences” due to the uncertainty of many classification criteria. The thematic structure of science has, of course, various levels and various dimensions. Arguments against any forms of separating the humanities from sciences in the traditional sense of the term are presented and discussed. Equally unacceptable are attempts at sharp separation of technical disciplines and humanities. The thematic structure of humanities (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Richard Kenneth Atkins (2006). Restructuring the Sciences: Peirce's Categories and His Classifications of the Sciences. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (4):483-500.score: 361.0
    : This essay shows that Peirce's (more or less) final classification of the sciences arises from the systematic application of his Categories of Firstness, Secondness and Thirdness to the classification of the sciences themselves and that he does not do so until his 1903's "An Outline Classification of the Sciences." The essay proceeds by: First, making some preliminary comments regarding Peirce's notion of an architectonic, or classification of the sciences; Second, briefly explaining (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. A. Broadfield (1946). The Philosophy of Classification. London, Grafton & Co..score: 360.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Robert F. McRae (1961). The Problem of the Unity of the Sciences: Bacon to Kant. [Toronto]University of Toronto Press.score: 360.0
  33. Frederick Robert Tennant (1932/1973). Philosophy of the Sciences. [Hamden, Conn.]Archon Books.score: 360.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Thomas (1963). The Division and Methods of the Sciences: Questions V and Vi of His Commentary on the De Trinitate of Boethius. Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.score: 360.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Thomas (1953). The Division and Methods of the Sciences. Toronto, Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.score: 360.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Lydia Patton (forthcoming). Methodology of the Sciences. In Michael Forster & Kristin Gjesdal (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of German Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century. Oxford University Press.score: 352.0
    In the growing Prussian university system of the early nineteenth century, "Wissenschaft" (science) was seen as an endeavor common to university faculties, characterized by a rigorous methodology. On this view, history and jurisprudence are sciences, as much as is physics. Nineteenth century trends challenged this view: the increasing influence of materialist and positivist philosophies, profound changes in the relationships between university faculties, and the defense of Kant's classification of the sciences by neo-Kantians. Wilhelm Dilthey's defense of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Yury Viktor Kissin (2013). Natural Sciences: Definitions and Attempt at Classification. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (2):116-137.score: 348.0
    The article discusses the formal classification of natural sciences, which is based on several propositions: (a) natural sciences can be separated onto independent and dependent sciences based on the gnosiologic criterion and irreducibility criteria (principal and technical); (b) there are four independent sciences which form a hierarchy: physics ← chemistry ← terrestrial biology ← human psychology; (c) every independent science except for physics has already developed or will develop in the future a set of final (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Catherine Kendig (2013). Integrating History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences in Practice to Enhance Science Education: Swammerdam's Historia Insectorum Generalis and the Case of the Water Flea. Science and Education 22 (8):1939-1961.score: 327.0
    Hasok Chang (Science & Education 20:317–341, 2011) shows how the recovery of past experimental knowledge, the physical replication of historical experiments, and the extension of recovered knowledge can increase scientific understanding. These activities can also play an important role in both science and history and philosophy of science education. In this paper I describe the implementation of an integrated learning project that I initiated, organized, and structured to complement a course in history and philosophy of the life sciences (HPLS). (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Karl Pearson (1957/2004). The Grammar of Science. Dover Publications.score: 318.0
    "A remarkable book that influenced the scientific thought of an entire generation."-- Dictionary of Scientific Biography A major statement of the language, method, and concepts of the physical sciences, this 1892 volume traces not only the history of experimental investigation but also the efforts of philosophic minds to state and organize their findings intelligently. A classic in the philosophy of science, its author is the founder of modern statistics. Karl Pearson was among the most influential university teachers of his (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Rajna Golubic, Mihael Rudes, Natasa Kovacic, Matko Marusic & Ana Marusic (2008). Calculating Impact Factor: How Bibliographical Classification of Journal Items Affects the Impact Factor of Large and Small Journals. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (1):41-49.score: 300.0
    As bibliographical classification of published journal items affects the denominator in this equation, we investigated how the numerator and denominator of the impact factor (IF) equation were generated for representative journals in two categories of the Journal Citation Reports (JCR). We performed a full text search of the 1st-ranked journal in 2004 JCR category “Medicine, General and Internal” (New England Journal of Medicine, NEJM, IF = 38.570) and 61st-ranked journal (Croatian Medical Journal, CMJ, IF = 0.690), 1st-ranked journal (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Mihael Rudes Rajna Golubic, Matko Marusic Natasa Kovacic & Ana Marusic (2008). Calculating Impact Factor: How Bibliographical Classification of Journal Items Affects the Impact Factor of Large and Small Journals. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (1).score: 300.0
    As bibliographical classification of published journal items affects the denominator in this equation, we investigated how the numerator and denominator of the impact factor (IF) equation were generated for representative journals in two categories of the Journal Citation Reports (JCR). We performed a full text search of the 1st-ranked journal in 2004 JCR category “Medicine, General and Internal” ( New England Journal of Medicine , NEJM , IF = 38.570) and 61st-ranked journal ( Croatian Medical Journal , CMJ (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Matt L. Drabek (2010). Interactive Classification and Practice in the Social Sciences. Poroi 6 (2):62-80.score: 297.0
    This paper examines the ways in which social scientific discourse and classification interact with the objects of social scientific investigation. I examine this interaction in the context of the traditional philosophical project of demarcating the social sciences from the natural sciences. I begin by reviewing Ian Hacking’s work on interactive classification and argue that there are additional forms of interaction that must be treated.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. David Ludwig (2013). Hysteria, Race, Phlogiston. A Model of Ontological Elimination in the Human Sciences. Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences:68-77.score: 288.0
  44. Stella Vosniadou, Costas Pagondiotis & Maria Deliyianni (2005). “From the Pragmatics of Classification Systems to the Metaphysics of Concepts&Quot;. [REVIEW] Journal of the Learning Sciences 14 (1):115-125.score: 285.0
    Review of the books: -/- Jerry A. Fodor. Concepts: Where Cognitive Science went wrong. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 1998, 174 pp., ISBN 0-19-823636-0. -/- Geoffrey C. Bowker and Susan Leigh Star. Sorting things out: Classification and its consequences. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1999, 377 pp., ISBN 0-262-02461-6.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2011). The Importance of History for Philosophy of Psychiatry: The Case of the DSM and Psychiatric Classification. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):446-470.score: 282.0
    Abstract Recently, some philosophers of psychiatry (viz., Rachel Cooper and Dominic Murphy) have analyzed the issue of psychiatric classification. This paper expands upon these analyses and seeks to demonstrate that a consideration of the history of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) can provide a rich and informative philosophical perspective for critically examining the issue of psychiatric classification. This case is intended to demonstrate the importance of history for philosophy of psychiatry, and more generally, the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Joachim Schummer (1997). Towards a Philosophy of Chemistry. A Short Extract of This Paper Was First Read at the 10th International Congress of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science, Florence, August 19–25, 1995. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 28 (2):307-336.score: 275.0
    The paper shows epistemological, methodological and ontological peculiarities of chemistry taken as a classificatory science of materials using experimental methods. Without succumbing to standard interpretations of physical science, chemical methods of experimental investigation, classification, reference, theorizing, prediction and production of new entities are developed one by one as first steps towards a philosophy of chemistry. Chemistry challenges traditional concepts of empirical object, empirical predicate, reference frame and theory, but also the distinction commonly drawn between natural science and technology. Due (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Eberhard Knobloch (2011). Kaspar Schott's “Encyclopedia of All Mathematical Sciences”. Poiesis and Praxis 7 (4):225-247.score: 270.0
    In 1661, Kaspar Schott published his comprehensive textbook Cursus mathematicus in Würzburg for the first time, his Encyclopedia of all mathematical sciences . It was so successful that it was published again in 1674 and 1677. In its 28 books, Schott gave an introduction for beginners in 22 mathematical disciplines by means of 533 figures and numerous tables. He wanted to avoid the shortness and the unintelligibility of his predecessors Alsted and Hérigone. He cited or recommended far more than (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Georg J. W. Dorn (1981). Die Korrektheit von Paul Weingartners Klassifikation der Wissenschaften. In Edgar Morscher, Otto Neumaier & Gerhard Zecha (eds.), Philosophie als Wissenschaft. Comes Verlag.score: 267.0
    Paul Weingartner's classification of the sciences is analyzed in detail. There is a small mistake in the definition of the set of descriptive-normative sciences, which makes the classification incorrect, but which can easily be remedied.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Kevin de Laplante, Sources of Domain-Independence in the Formal Sciences.score: 267.0
    Any discussion of the concept of “formal science” must acknowledge that the term is used in different ways, for different purposes, by different people. For some, the formal sciences are defined by the exclusive use of deductive methods for discovering, or reasoning about, the properties of formal, abstract systems. On this view, the formal sciences are synonymous with mathematics, formal logic, and certain branches of linguistics and computer science that emphasize the study of formal languages. For others, “formal (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Gregory B. Stone (2013). Dante’s Commedia, Islamic Rationalism, and the Enumeration of the Sciences. Doctor Virtualis 12.score: 267.0
    Lo studio sul rapporto tra Dante e la tradizione arabo-islamica è solitamente associato a due influenti studiosi del Novecento, Miguel Asín Palacios e Bruno Nardi. Nonostante le differenze, entrambi affermano che la struttura fondamentale della Commedia intende mostrare come la ragione naturale dell’uomo e la filosofia siano inferiori alla rivelazione religiosa e alla teologia . Il contributo, affermando che l’architettura del poema dantesco si fonda sulla classificazione delle scienze formulata dai filosofi islamici , intende mostrare che la struttura allegorica della (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 999