Search results for 'Clive Fletcher' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Clive Fletcher & Caroline Bailey (2003). Assessing Self-Awareness: Some Issues and Methods. Journal of Managerial Psychology 18 (5):395-404.score: 240.0
  2. Clive Fletcher (1992). Ethical Issues in the Selection Interview. Journal of Business Ethics 11 (5-6):361-367.score: 240.0
    This article evaluates various aspects of the selection interview in terms of the major principles of business ethics. It looks at both interviewer and interviewee behavior and examines the ethical questions that arise around five key themes: Preparation for the interview; Openness, disclosure and the invasion of privacy; Honesty and impression management; Power relationships in the interview; The use of interview information in decision making. It is argued that clear guidelines for ethical behavior in the interview are needed and would (...)
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  3. Joseph F. Fletcher (1966/1997). Situation Ethics: The New Morality. Westminster John Knox Press.score: 60.0
    This is a new edition of Joseph Fletcher's 1966 work that ignited a firestorm of controversy at the time of its publication.
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  4. George P. Fletcher (2007). The Grammar of Criminal Law: American, Comparative, and International. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The Grammar of Criminal Law is a 3-volume work that addresses the field of international and comparative criminal law, with its primary focus on the issues of international concern, ranging from genocide, to domestic efforts to combat terrorism, to torture, and to other international crimes. The first volume is devoted to foundational issues. The Grammar of Criminal Law is unique in its systematic emphasis on the relationship between language and legal theory; there is no comparable comparative study of legal language. (...)
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  5. George P. Fletcher (1996). Basic Concepts of Legal Thought. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    In this one-of-a-kind text, George P. Fletcher, a renowned legal theorist, offers a provocative yet accessible overview of the basics of legal thought. The first section of the book is designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts such as the rule of law and deciding cases under the law. It continues with an analysis of the values of justice, desert, consent, and equality, as they figure into our judgment of legal cultures in terms of soundness and legitimacy. The (...)
     
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  6. Guy Fletcher (2008). 'Mill, Moore, and Intrinsic Value'. Social Theory and Practice 34 (4):517-32.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I examine how philosophers before and after G. E. Moore understood intrinsic value. The main idea I wish to bring out and defend is that Moore was insufficiently attentive to how distinctive his conception of intrinsic value was, as compared with those of the writers he discussed, and that such inattentiveness skewed his understanding of the positions of others that he discussed and dismissed. My way into this issue is by examining the charge of inconsistency that Moore (...)
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  7. Brad Hooker & Guy Fletcher (2008). Variable Versus Fixed-Rate Rule-Utilitarianism. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (231):344–352.score: 30.0
    Fixed-rate versions of rule-consequentialism and rule-utilitarianism evaluate rules in terms of the expected net value of one particular level of social acceptance, but one far enough below 100% social acceptance to make salient the complexities created by partial compliance. Variable-rate versions of rule-consequentialism and rule-utilitarianism instead evaluate rules in terms of their expected net value at all different levels of social acceptance. Brad Hooker has advocated a fixed-rate version. Michael Ridge has argued that the variable-rate version is better. The debate (...)
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  8. R. Boddy Clive, K. Ladyshewsky Richard & Peter Galvin (forthcoming). The Influence of Corporate Psychopaths on Corporate Social Responsibility and Organizational Commitment to Employees. Journal of Business Ethics.score: 30.0
    This study investigated whether employee perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) were associated with the presence of Corporate Psychopaths in corporations. The article states that, as psychopaths are 1% of the population, it is logical to assume that every large corporation has psychopaths working within it. To differentiate these people from the common perception of psychopaths as being criminals, they have been called “Corporate Psychopaths” in this research. The article presents quantitative empirical research into the influence of Corporate Psychopaths on (...)
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  9. Guy Fletcher (2012). Resisting Buck-Passing Accounts of Prudential Value. Philosophical Studies 157 (1):77-91.score: 30.0
    This paper aims to cast doubt upon a certain way of analysing prudential value (or good for ), namely in the manner of a ‘buck-passing’ analysis. It begins by explaining why we should be interested in analyses of good for and the nature of buck-passing analyses generally (§I). It moves on to considering and rejecting two sets of buck-passing analyses. The first are analyses that are likely to be suggested by those attracted to the idea of analysing good for in (...)
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  10. Guy Fletcher (2013). A Fresh Start for the Objective-List Theory of Well-Being. Utilitas 25 (2):206-220.score: 30.0
    So-called theories of well-being (prudential value, welfare) are under-represented in discussions of well-being. I do four things in this article to redress this. First, I develop a new taxonomy of theories of well-being, one that divides theories in a more subtle and illuminating way. Second, I use this taxonomy to undermine some misconceptions that have made people reluctant to hold objective-list theories. Third, I provide a new objective-list theory and show that it captures a powerful motivation for the main competitor (...)
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  11. Michael Joseph Fletcher (2011). The Cognitive Significance of Kant's Third Critique. Dissertation, University of California, Santa Barbarascore: 30.0
    This dissertation aims at forging an archetectonic link between Kant's first and third Critiques within a cognitive-semantic framework. My aim is to show how the major conceptual innovations of Kant’s third Critique can be plausibly understood in terms of the theoretical aims of the first, (Critique of Pure Reason). However, unlike other cognition-oriented approaches to Kant's third Critique, which take the point of contact between the first and third Critique's to be the first Critique's Transcendental Analytic, I link these two (...)
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  12. Guy Fletcher (2012). The Locative Analysis of Good For Formulated and Defended. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy (JESP) 6 (1).score: 30.0
    THE STRUCTURE OF THIS PAPER IS AS FOLLOWS. I begin §1 by dealing with preliminary issues such as the different relations expressed by the “good for” locution. I then (§2) outline the Locative Analysis of good for and explain its main elements before moving on to (§3) outlining and discussing the positive features of the view. In the subsequent sections I show how the Locative Analysis can respond to objections from, or inspired by, Sumner (§4-5), Regan (§6), and Schroeder and (...)
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  13. Guy Fletcher (2009). Rejecting Well-Being Invariabilism. Philosophical Papers 38 (1):21-34.score: 30.0
    This paper is an attempt to undermine a basic assumption of theories of well-being, one that I call well-being invariabilism. I argue that much of what makes existing theories of well-being inadequate stems from the invariabilist assumption. After distinguishing and explaining well-being invariabilism and well-being variabilism, I show that the most widely-held theories of well-being—hedonism, desire-satisfaction, and pluralist objective-list theories—presuppose invariabilism and that a large class of the objections to them arise because of it. My aim is to show that (...)
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  14. Samuel C. Fletcher (2012). What Counts as a Newtonian System? The View From Norton's Dome. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 2 (3):275-297.score: 30.0
    If the force on a particle fails to satisfy a Lipschitz condition at a point, it relaxes one of the conditions necessary for a locally unique solution to the particle’s equation of motion. I examine the most discussed example of this failure of determinism in classical mechanics—that of Norton’s dome—and the range of current objections against it. Finding there are many different conceptions of classical mechanics appropriate and useful for different purposes, I argue that no single conception is preferred. Instead (...)
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  15. Michael Fletcher (2005). Dependent Beauty and Perfection in Kant's Aesthetics. Philosophical Writings (29).score: 30.0
    This paper attacks an account of Kant's controversial distinction between "free" and "dependent" beauty. I present three problems—The Lorland problem, The Crawford Problem, and the problem of intrinsic relation—that are shown to be a consequence of various interpretations of Kant's distinction. Next, I reconstruct Robert Wicks' well-known account of dependent beauty as "the appreciation of teleological style" and point out a key equivocation in the statement of Wicks' account: the judgment of dependent beauty can be thought to consist in comparing (...)
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  16. Guy Fletcher (2009). Review of Richard Kraut’s What is Good And Why: The Ethics of Well-Being. [REVIEW] Analysis 69 (3):576-8.score: 30.0
  17. G. Fletcher (1995). The Scientific Credibility of Folk Psychology. Lawrence Erlbaum.score: 30.0
    The assumption on which this volume is founded is that a proper comparison between scientific cognition and folk ways of thought rests on an adequate study of ...
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  18. Guy Fletcher (2010). Hume's Morality: Feeling and Fabrication – Rachel Cohon. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (241):861-863.score: 30.0
  19. Guy Fletcher (2010). Brown and Moore's Value Invariabilism Vs Dancy's Variabilism. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (238):162-168.score: 30.0
    Campbell Brown has recently argued that G.E. Moore's intrinsic value holism is superior to Jonathan Dancy's. I show that the advantage which Brown claims for Moore's view over Dancy's is illusory, and that Dancy's view may be superior.
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  20. Guy Fletcher (2008). The Consistency of Qualitative Hedonism and the Value of (at Least Some) Malicious Pleasures. Utilitas 20 (4):462-471.score: 30.0
    In this article, I examine two of the standard objections to forms of value hedonism. The first is the common claim, most famously made by Bradley and Moore, that Mill's qualitative hedonism is inconsistent. The second is the apparent problem for quantitative hedonism in dealing with malicious pleasures. I argue that qualitative hedonism is consistent, even if it is implausible on other grounds. I then go on to show how our intuitions about malicious pleasure might be misleading.
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  21. Guy Fletcher (2009). Sentimental Value. Journal of Value Inquiry 43 (1):55-65.score: 30.0
  22. G. Fletcher (1995). Two Uses of Folk Psychology: Implications for Psychological Science. Philosophical Psychology 8 (3):375-88.score: 30.0
    This article describes two uses of folk psychology in scientific psychology. Use 1 deals with the way in which folk theories and beliefs are imported into social psychological models on the basis that they exert causal influences on cognition or behavior (regardless of their validity or scientific usefulness). Use 2 describes the practice of mining elements from folk psychology for building an overarching psychological theory that goes beyond common sense (and assumes such elements are valid or scientifically useful). This distinction (...)
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  23. Guy Fletcher (2009). Uneasy Companions. Ratio 22 (3):359-368.score: 30.0
  24. John Fletcher (2002). Freud, Hoffmann and the Death-Work. Angelaki 7 (2):125 – 141.score: 30.0
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  25. George P. Fletcher (2006). Political Theory and Criminal Law. Criminal Justice Ethics 25 (1):18-38.score: 30.0
  26. Guy Fletcher (2007). Wrongness, Welfarism and Evolution: Crisp on Reasons and the Good. Ratio 20 (3):341–347.score: 30.0
  27. H. -G. Gadamer & J. Fletcher (1998). On the Political Incompetence of Philosophy. Diogenes 46 (182):3-11.score: 30.0
  28. Paul Fletcher (2008). Prolegomena to a Theology of Death. Neue Zeitschrift für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 50 (2):139-157.score: 30.0
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  29. Guy Fletcher (2009). On Hatzimoysis on Sentimental Value. Philosophia 37 (1):149-152.score: 30.0
    Despite its apparent ubiquity, philosophers have not talked much about sentimental value. One exception is Anthony Hatzimoysis (The Philosophical Quarterly 53:373–379, 2003). Those who wish to take sentimental value seriously are likely to make use of Christine Korsgaard’s ideas on two distinctions in value. In this paper I show that Hatzimoysis has misrendered Korsgaard’s insight in his discussion of sentimental value. I begin by briefly summarising Korsgaard’s idea before showing how Hatzimoysis’ treatment of it is mistaken.
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  30. Angus Fletcher (2005). Francis Bacon's Forms and the Logic of Ramist Conversion. Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (2):157-169.score: 30.0
    : Despite the historical importance of Francis Bacon's grand vision of science, the doctrine of Form that supports his program of works is now generally agreed to be incoherent. This paper will argue, however, that Bacon's belief in the convertibility of matter gains a previously unacknowledged coherence when approached through the treatment of axiom conversion expressed in Ramus' 1574 Dialectica. Ultimately this will lead to the conclusion that Bacon did not--like most twentieth-century philosophers--see the universe as a collection of matter (...)
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  31. Guy Fletcher (2011). Review of Ben Eggleston, Dale Miller & David Weinstein (Eds.), John Stuart Mill and the Art of Life. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.score: 30.0
  32. James W. Moore, Anthony Dickinson & Paul C. Fletcher (2011). Sense of Agency, Associative Learning, and Schizotypy. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):792-800.score: 30.0
  33. Samuel C. Fletcher, Discussion Notes on Physical Computation.score: 30.0
    Much has been written as of late on the status of the physical Church- Turing thesis and the relation between physics and computer science in general. The following discussion will focus on one such article [5]. The purpose of these notes is not so much to argue for a particular thesis as it is to solicit a dialog that will help clarify our own thoughts.
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  34. G. B. A. Fletcher (1932). More Loeb Cicero Cicero: Pro Milone, In Pisonem, Pro Scauro, Pro Fonteio, Pro Rabirio Postumo, Pro Marcello, Pro Ligario, Pro Deioiaro. With an English Translation by N. H. Watts. Pp. Viii + 547. (Loeb Classical Library.) London: Heinemann, 1931. Cloth, 10s. Net; Leather, 12s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 46 (03):129-130.score: 30.0
  35. George P. Fletcher (1989). Punishment and Self-Defense. Law and Philosophy 8 (2):201 - 215.score: 30.0
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  36. Guy Fletcher (2013). A Millian Objection to Reasons as Evidence. Utilitas 25 (3):417-420.score: 30.0
  37. David B. Fletcher (2003). Gambling and Character. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (1):1-15.score: 30.0
    Legalized gambling has all the hallmarks of a large-scale moral and social concern, yet, remarkably, philosophers have paid scarce attention to the moral issues surrounding this phenomenon. I believe that this neglect is unjustified. While much could be said about gambling in terms of its social impact, I offer an account on the moral status of gambling and avoid the temptation to give a “thin” account in simply categorizing gambling as “permissible” or “impermissible.” I attempt to assess its impact on (...)
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  38. Joseph Fletcher (1987). The Courts and Euthanasia. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 15 (4):223-230.score: 30.0
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  39. Peter Fletcher (2002). A Constructivist Perspective on Physics. Philosophia Mathematica 10 (1):26-42.score: 30.0
    This paper examines the problem of extending the programme of mathematical constructivism to applied mathematics. I am not concerned with the question of whether conventional mathematical physics makes essential use of the principle of excluded middle, but rather with the more fundamental question of whether the concept of physical infinity is constructively intelligible. I consider two kinds of physical infinity: a countably infinite constellation of stars and the infinitely divisible space-time continuum. I argue (contrary to Hellman) that these do not. (...)
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  40. G. B. A. Fletcher (1929). Cicero's Political Essays Cicero : De Re Publica, De Legibus. With an English Translation by Clinton Walker Keyes. Pp. 533. (Loeb Classical Library.) London: Heinemann, 1928. Cloth, 10s. Net; Leather, 12s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (05):190-191.score: 30.0
  41. Robert D. Truog & John C. Fletcher (1990). Brain Death and the Anencephalic Newborn. Bioethics 4 (3):199–215.score: 30.0
  42. Jeffrey S. Wilkinson & James E. Fletcher (1995). Bloody News and Vulnerable Populations: An Ethical Question. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (3):167 – 177.score: 30.0
    A common occurrence in television news is the showing of graphic scenes of human suffering. It was hypothesized that viewing such scenes could be harmful to a segment of the population. A controlled experiment examined the impact of images showing victim blood inserted into into television news stories about auto accidents. The amount of blood shown was manipulated, resulting in three video versions, roughly in terms of low, medium, and high. Participants were measured beforehand on the variable of "locus of (...)
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  43. John C. Fletcher (1985). Ethical Issues in and Beyond Prospective Clinical Trials of Human Gene Therapy. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 10 (3):293-310.score: 30.0
    As the potential for the first human trials of somatic cell gene therapy nears, two ethical issues are examined: (1) problems of moral choice for members of institutional review boards who consider the first protocols, for parents, and for the clinical researchers, and the special protections that may be required for the infants and children to be involved, and (2) ethical objections to somatic cell therapy made by those concerned about a putative inevitable progression of genetic knowledge from therapy to (...)
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  44. George P. Fletcher (1996). The Case for Tolerance. Social Philosophy and Policy 13 (01):229-.score: 30.0
  45. George P. Fletcher (1993). The Commonality of Loyalty and Tolerance. Criminal Justice Ethics 12 (1):68-70.score: 30.0
  46. George P. Fletcher (1982). The Recidivist Premium. Criminal Justice Ethics 1 (2):54-59.score: 30.0
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  47. Dorothy C. Wertz & John C. Fletcher (1991). Privacy and Disclosure in Medical Genetics Examined in an Ethics of Care. Bioethics 5 (3):212–232.score: 30.0
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  48. J. C. Fletcher (1989). Ethical Aspect of Research Involving Elderly Subjects. Journal of Clinical Ethics 1 (4):285-286.score: 30.0
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  49. G. B. A. Fletcher (1929). Seneca's Suasoriae The Suasoriae of Seneca the Elder. Introductory Essay, Text, Translation and Explanatory Notes by William A. Edward, M.A., D.Litt. Pp. Xlvii + 160. Cambridge: University Press, 1928. Cloth, 12s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (01):37-38.score: 30.0
  50. George P. Fletcher (1983). The Search for Synthesis in Tort Theory. Law and Philosophy 2 (1):63 - 88.score: 30.0
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