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  1. Clive L. Spash, Sigrid Stagl & Michael Getzner (2005). Exploring Alternatives for Environmental Valuation. In Michael Getzner, Clive L. Spash & Sigrid Stagl (eds.), Alternatives for Environmental Valuation. Routledge 1--27.
     
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  2.  19
    Clive L. Spash (1993). Economics, Ethics, and Long-Term Environmental Damages. Environmental Ethics 15 (2):117-132.
    Neither environmental economics nor environmental philosophy have adequately examined the moral implications of imposing environmental degradation and ecosystem instability upon our descendants. A neglected aspect of these problems is the supposed extent of the burden that the current generation is placing on future generations. The standard economic position on discounting implies an ethicaljudgment concerning future generations. If intergenerational obligations exist, then two types of intergenerational transfer must be considered: basic distributional transfers and compensatory transfers. Basic transfers have been the central (...)
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  3.  10
    Clive L. Spash (1994). Trying to Find the Right Approach to Greenhouse Economics. Analyse & Kritik 16 (2):186-199.
    The approach to controlling greenhouse gas emissions suggested by simple neo-classical economic models has appeared in prominent mainstream journals. This entails weighing up the costs of control compared to the benefits of avoiding damages due to global climate change. This paper presents a critique of extending the microeconomic project based methodology to a complex global problem; raising issues of uncertainty and ignorance. An alternative to simple utilitarianism is seen to be necessary and the potential of a deontological approach is argued (...)
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  4.  2
    Emily Brady, Isis Brook, Jouni Paavola, Clive L. Spash, Marko Ahteensuu, Helena Siipi, Mohammad Reza Balali, Jozef Keulartz, Michiel Korthals & Ted Benton (2009). Index to Environmental Values Volume 18, 2009. Environmental Values 18:541-544.
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  5. Andrew Light, Jonathan M. Smith, Annie L. Booth, Robert Burch, John Clark, Anthony M. Clayton, Matthew Gandy, Eric Katz, Roger King, Roger Paden, Clive L. Spash, Eliza Steelwater, Zev Trachtenberg & James L. Wescoat (1996). Philosophy and Geography I: Space, Place, and Environmental Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The inaugural collection in an exciting new exchange between philosophers and geographers, this volume provides interdisciplinary approaches to the environment as space, place, and idea. Never before have philosophers and geographers approached each other's subjects in such a strong spirit of mutual understanding. The result is a concrete exploration of the human-nature relationship that embraces strong normative approaches to environmental problems.
     
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  6.  2
    Clive L. Spash (2009). Editorial. The New Environmental Pragmatists, Pluralism and Sustainability. Environmental Values 18 (3):253-256.
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  7. Clive L. Spash (2009). Review of The Economy of the Earth (Mark Sagoff). [REVIEW] Environmental Values 18 (4):536-538.
     
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  8.  2
    Clive L. Spash (2012). Editorial: Green Economy, Red Herring. Environmental Values 21 (2):95-99.
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  9.  1
    Clive L. Spash (2014). Editorial: Seeking Sustainability. Environmental Values 23 (1):1-6.
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  10.  2
    Isis Brook, Katie Mcshane, Clive L. Spash, Nina Witoszek, Elisa Aaltola, Maniklal Adhikary, Samrat Chowdhury, Kevin Behrens, Arnold Berleant & Catherine Butler (2010). Index to Environmental Values Volume 19, 2010. Environmental Values 19:553-556.
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  11.  1
    Clive L. Spash (2013). Editorial: Changes Needed. Environmental Values 22 (1):1-5.
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  12.  1
    Clive L. Spash (2010). Editorial. Censoring Science in Research Officially. Environmental Values 19 (2):141-146.
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  13. Isis Brook, Mark Whitehead, Katie Mcshane, Clive L. Spash, Robin Attfield, Daniel Baskind, Robert Heath French, Kerry Walker, John Cottingham & Alan Holland (2011). Index to Environmental Values Volume 20, 2011. Environmental Values 20:573-576.
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  14.  11
    Michael Getzner, Clive L. Spash & Sigrid Stagl (eds.) (2005). Alternatives for Environmental Valuation. Routledge.
    How can we value the environment, this is the crucial issue that this book debates. The critical analyses carried out within the book by such figures as Nick Hanley and Jonathan Aldred are vital to ensuring that future economic growth is not achieved at the expense of our environment.
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  15. Douglas MacLean, Clive L. Spash & John O'Neill (1994). John Foster Beyond Costs and Benefits: Weighing Environmental Goods 133 Anna Kusser: Comment on John Foster 150 Peter Schaber Sind Alle Werte Vergleichbar? [REVIEW] Analyse & Kritik 16 (2).
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  16. John O'Neill, Clive L. Spash, Mark Whitehead, Robin Attfield, Bernard Baertschi, Seth D. Baum, Carol Booth, Peter F. Cannavò & Anna Deplazes-Zemp (2012). Index to Environmental Values Volume 21, 2012. Environmental Values 21:545-548.
     
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  17. Clive L. Spash (2008). Alan Holland - Publications. Environmental Values 17 (2):307-312.
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  18. Clive L. Spash (2013). Changes Needed. Environmental Values 22 (1):1-5.
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  19. Clive L. Spash (2011). Editorial: Terrible Economics, Ecosystems and Banking. Environmental Values 20 (2):141-145.
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  20. Clive L. Spash (2007). Review of The Economics of Climate Change (The Stern Review). [REVIEW] Environmental Values 16 (4):532-535.
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  21. Clive L. Spash (2016). Social Ecological Transformation and the Individual. Environmental Values 25 (3):253-258.
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  22. Clive L. Spash (2015). Tackling Climate Change, Breaking the Frame of Modernity. Environmental Values 24 (4):437-444.
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  23. Clive L. Spash (2015). The Dying Planet Index: Life, Death and Man's Domination of Nature. Environmental Values 24 (1):1-7.
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  24.  11
    Clive L. Spash (2009). The New Environmental Pragmatists, Pluralism and Sustainability. Environmental Values 18 (3):253 - 256.
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  25.  6
    Clive L. Spash (2008). How Much is That Ecosystem in the Window? The One with the Bio-Diverse Trail. Environmental Values 17 (2):259-284.
    Ecosystems are increasingly characterised as goods and services to allow their valuation in monetary terms. This follows an orthodox economic approach to environmental values, but is also being undertaken by ecologists and conservation biologists. There then appears a lack of clarity and debate as to the model of human behaviour, specific values and decision process being adopted. Arguments for ecosystems service valuation are critically appraised and the case for a model leading to value pluralism is presented. The outcome is to (...)
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  26.  11
    Clive L. Spash (1999). The Development of Environmental Thinking in Economics. Environmental Values 8 (4):413-435.
    There has always been a sub-group of established economists trying to convey an environmental critique of the mainstream. This paper traces their thinking into the late 20th century via the development of associations and journals in the USA and Europe. There is clearly a divergence between the conformity to neo-classical economics favoured by resource and environmental economists and the acceptance of more radical critiques apparent in ecological economics. Thus, the progressive elements of ecological economics are increasingly incompatible with those practising (...)
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  27.  6
    Clive L. Spash (2007). Changing Climates, Changing Values, Changing Editors: 'All Change'. Environmental Values 16 (2):143 - 147.
  28.  13
    Clive L. Spash (2011). Terrible Economics, Ecosystems and Banking. Environmental Values 20 (2):141 - 145.
  29.  6
    Clive L. Spash (2008). A Worthwhile Academic Life. Environmental Values 17 (2):121 - 124.
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  30.  8
    Clive L. Spash (2012). Green Economy, Red Herring. Environmental Values 21 (2):95 - 99.
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  31.  6
    Clive L. Spash (2000). Ethical Motives and Charitable Contributions in Contingent Valuation: Empirical Evidence From Social Psychology and Economics. Environmental Values 9 (4):453-479.
    Contingent valuation of the environment has proven popular amongst environmental economists in recent years and has increased the role of monetary valuation in public policy. However, the underlying economic model of human psychology fails to explain why certain types of stated behaviour are observed. Thus, good scope exists for interdisciplinary research in the area of economics and psychology with regard to environmental valuation. A critical review is presented here of some recent research by social psychologists in the US attempting to (...)
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  32.  4
    Clive L. Spash (2010). Censoring Science in Research Officially. Environmental Values 19 (2):141 - 146.
  33. Clive L. Spash (2006). Environmental Values in the USA Today. Environmental Values 15 (3):269-271.
    The perspective from the USA which is provided in this issue shows that environmental debate is still alive in that country although, from an outsider' s perspective, the debate seems to be an increasingly restricted and uncertain one. As noted in this special issue, North America is regarded as having an environmental movement which is under duress and in need of reinvigoration. Among the conflicted values of individual citizens, materialism and markets win in a political economy dominated by instrumentality. As (...))
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