Search results for 'Cognition and culture' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  19
    Merlin Donald (1993). Précis of Origins of the Modern Mind: Three Stages in the Evolution of Culture and Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):737-748.
    This bold and brilliant book asks the ultimate question of the life sciences: How did the human mind acquire its incomparable power? In seeking the answer, Merlin Donald traces the evolution of human culture and cognition from primitive apes to the era of artificial intelligence, and presents an original theory of how the human mind evolved from its presymbolic form. In the emergence of modern human culture, Donald proposes, there were three radical transitions. During the first, our (...)
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  2.  12
    Frederick Luis Aldama (2012). Strange Concepts and the Stories They Make Possible: Cognition, Culture, Narrative (Review). Substance 41 (3):180-182.
    In Strange Concepts and The Stories they Make Possible: Cognition, Culture, Narrative, Lisa Zunshine widens her scope from an erstwhile singular focus on Theory of Mind (inferring interior states from exterior expression and gesture) in fiction, turning her sights toward a branch of psychology aimed at the study of the early cognitive development of humans. Here she explores our distinctive mental capacity to ascribe a function to objects (a chair is to sit, etc.) and an essence to living (...)
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  3.  16
    Bradd Shore (1996). Culture in Mind: Cognition, Culture, and the Problem of Meaning. OUP Usa.
    Culture in Mind is an ethnographic portrait of the human mind. Using case studies from both western and nonwestern societies. Shore argues that "cultural models" are necessary to the functioning of the human mind. Drawing on recent developments in cognitive science as well as anthropology, Culture in Mind explores the cognitive world of culture in the ongoing production of meaning in everyday thinking and feeling.
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  4. Armin W. Geertz & Jeppe Sinding Jensen (eds.) (2010). Religious Narrative, Cognition, and Culture: Image and Word in the Mind of Narrative. Equinox Pub. Ltd..
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  5.  13
    Norbert Ross, Jeffrey T. Shenton, Werner Hertzog & Mike Kohut (2015). Language, Culture and Spatial Cognition: Bringing Anthropology to the Table. Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 10 (1):1-18.
    Languages vary in their semantic partitioning of the world. This has led to speculation that language might shape basic cognitive processes. Spatial cognition has been an area of research in which linguistic relativity – the effect of language on thought – has both been proposed and rejected. Prior studies have been inconclusive, lacking experimental rigor or appropriate research design. Lacking detailed ethnographic knowledge as well as failing to pay attention to intralanguage variations, these studies often fall short of defining (...)
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  6. Alan Richardson & Ellen Spolsky (2004). The Work of Fiction Cognition, Culture, and Complexity. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  7.  13
    G. Rusch (2007). Understanding. The Mutual Regulation of Cognition and Culture. Constructivist Foundations 2 (2-3):118-128.
    Purpose: Demonstrate that cognitive and social approaches towards understanding do not at all oppose but rather they complement each other. Constructivist concepts of understanding paved the way to conceive of understanding as a cognitive-social "mechanism" which mutually regulates processes of social structuration and, at the same time, cognitive constructions and processing. Findings: Constructivist approaches bridge the gap between the cognitive and the social faces of understanding. They demonstrate how comprehension and cultivation, cognition and cultural reproduction are mutually linked to (...)
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  8.  5
    Niall J. L. Grifith (2005). Is Cognition Plus Technology an Unbounded System?: Technology, Representation and Culture. Pragmatics and Cognition 13 (3):583-614.
    The relationship between cognition and culture is discussed in terms of technology and representation. The computational metaphor is discussed in relation to its providing an account of cognitive and technical development: the role of representation and self-modification through environmental manipulation and the development of open learning from stigmery. A rationalisation for the transformational effects of information and representation is sought in the physical and biological theories of Autokatakinetics and Autopoiesis. The conclusion drawn is that culture, rather than (...)
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  9.  4
    Thomas I. White (2013). Review Whales and Dolphins: Cognition, Culture, Conservation and Human Perceptions Brakes Philippa Simmonds Mark Peter Earthscan London. Journal of Animal Ethics 3 (2):222-224.
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  10. M. Hayward & F. L. Aldama (2012). Zunshine, Lisa. Strange Concepts and the Stories They Make Possible: Cognition, Culture, Narrative. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008. Pp. 232. [REVIEW] Substance 41 (3):180-182.
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  11. Lawrence A. Hirschfeld (1996). Making in America: Cognition, Culture, and the Child's Construction of Human Kinds. A Bradford Book.
    _Race in the Making _provides a new understanding of how people conceptualize social categories and shows why this knowledge is so readily recruited to create and maintain systems of unequal power. Hirschfeld argues that knowledge of race is not derived from observations of physical difference nor does it develop in the same way as knowledge of other social categories. Instead, his central claim is that racial thinking is the product of a special-purpose cognitive competence for understanding and representing human kinds. (...)
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  12. Lawrence A. Hirschfeld (1998). Making in America: Cognition, Culture, and the Child's Construction of Human Kinds. A Bradford Book.
    _Race in the Making _provides a new understanding of how people conceptualize social categories and shows why this knowledge is so readily recruited to create and maintain systems of unequal power. Hirschfeld argues that knowledge of race is not derived from observations of physical difference nor does it develop in the same way as knowledge of other social categories. Instead, his central claim is that racial thinking is the product of a special-purpose cognitive competence for understanding and representing human kinds. (...)
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  13. Bradd Shore (1996). Culture in Mind: Cognition, Culture, and the Problem of Meaning. Oxford University Press Usa.
    "Clearly argued and captivatingly developed through subtle analyses of ethnographic materials...[this book] will revitalize cultural anthropology."--Fredrik Barth.
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  14. Ellen Spolsky (2015). The Contracts of Fiction: Cognition, Culture, Community. OUP Usa.
    The Contracts of Fiction invites readers to consider the advantages of describing fictions as governed by a set of social contracts, teaching us how to think about the stuff of daily life, animate and inanimate, as abstractions.
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  15. C. A. Taylor (1996). Carol Berkenkotter and Thomas N. Hickin, Genre Knowledge in Disciplinary Communication: Cognition/Culture/Power. Argumentation 10:495-499.
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  16.  41
    Sue Savage-Rumbaugh, William M. Fields & Par Segerdahl (2005). Culture Prefigures Cognition in Pan/Homo Bonobos. Theoria 20 (3):311-328.
    This article questions traditional experimental approaches to the study of primate cognition. Beecuse of a widespread assumption that cognition in non-human primates is genetically encoded and “natural,” these approaches neglect how profoundly apes’ cultural rearing experiences affect test results. We deseribe how three advanced cognitive abilities - imitation, theory of mind and language - emerged in bonobos maturing in a bi-species Pan/Homo culture, and how individual rearing differences led to individual forms of these abilities. These descriptions are (...)
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  17.  37
    Duane Rumbaugh (2005). Culture Prefigures Cognition in Pan/Homo Bonobos. Theoria 20 (3):311-328.
    This article questions traditional experimental approaches to the study of primate cognition. Beecuse of a widespread assumption that cognition in non-human primates is genetically encoded and “natural,” these approaches neglect how profoundly apes’ cultural rearing experiences affect test results. We deseribe how three advanced cognitive abilities - imitation, theory of mind and language - emerged in bonobos maturing in a bi-species Pan/Homo culture, and how individual rearing differences led to individual forms of these abilities. These descriptions are (...)
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  18.  15
    Marcel Danesi (2009). Opposition Theory and the Interconnectedness of Language, Culture, and Cognition. Sign Systems Studies 37 (1-2):11-41.
    The theory of opposition has always been viewed as the founding principle of structuralism within contemporary linguistics and semiotics. As an analytical technique, it has remained a staple within these disciplines, where it continues to be used as a means for identifying meaningful cues in the physical form ofsigns. However, as a theory of conceptual structure it was largely abandoned under the weight of post-structuralism starting in the 1960s — the exception tothis counter trend being the work of the Tartu (...)
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  19.  6
    Rw Ir Gibbs, C. Goddard, A. I. Goldman, I. Grady, D. Graff & M. Gullberg (2012). 356 Space and Time in Languages and Cultures: Language, Culture, and Cognition. In L. Filipovic & K. M. Jaszczolt (eds.), Space and Time in Languages and Cultures: Language, Culture, and Cognition. John Benjamins 355.
  20.  3
    Iván Oliva (2012). Life, cognition and culture: charting processes of self-eco-organization. Cinta de Moebio 43 (43):40-49.
    This paper proposes an initial epistemological course related to the notions of life, cognition, and culture from the fundamental elements of the complexity theory and, specifically, related to the notion of self-eco-organization. With these, we pretend to search isomorphic or transverse properties to all these notions; emphasizing the ideas of complexity, autonomy and dependence. El presente trabajo propone un derrotero epistemológico preliminar en torno a las nociones de vida, cognición y cultura, desde la base de algunos elementos de (...)
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  21.  1
    Natural Semantic Metalanguage (2012). 360 Space and Time in Languages and Cultures: Language, Culture, and Cognition. In L. Filipovic & K. M. Jaszczolt (eds.), Space and Time in Languages and Cultures: Language, Culture, and Cognition. John Benjamins 359.
  22.  1
    I. Kim (2012). 356 Space and Time in Languages and Cultures: Language, Culture, and Cognition. In L. Filipovic & K. M. Jaszczolt (eds.), Space and Time in Languages and Cultures: Language, Culture, and Cognition. John Benjamins 37--60.
  23. Armin W. Geertz (2010). Religious Narrative, Cognition, and Culture : Approaches and Definitions. In Armin W. Geertz & Jeppe Sinding Jensen (eds.), Religious Narrative, Cognition, and Culture: Image and Word in the Mind of Narrative. Equinox Pub. Ltd.
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  24. Jeppe Sinding Jensen (2010). Framing Religious Narrative, Cognition, and Culture Theoretically. In Armin W. Geertz & Jeppe Sinding Jensen (eds.), Religious Narrative, Cognition, and Culture: Image and Word in the Mind of Narrative. Equinox Pub. Ltd.
     
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  25. Jean Lave (1988). Cognition in Practice: Mind, Mathematics and Culture in Everyday Life. Cambridge University Press.
    Most previous research on human cognition has focused on problem-solving, and has confined its investigations to the laboratory. As a result, it has been difficult to account for complex mental processes and their place in culture and history. In this startling - indeed, disco in forting - study, Jean Lave moves the analysis of one particular form of cognitive activity, - arithmetic problem-solving - out of the laboratory into the domain of everyday life. In so doing, she shows (...)
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  26. Franson D. Manjali (2000). Meaning, Culture and Cognition. Bahri Publications.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface v -- CRITIQUE -- 1. Culture and Semantics 1 -- 2. What is 'Cartesian' in Linguistics? 8 -- 3. Computer, Brain and Grammatical Theory 22 -- DYNAMICAL SEMANTICS -- 4. From Discrete Signs to Dynamic Semantic Continuum 37 -- 5. Catastrophe Theoretic Semantics: -- Towards a Physics of Meaning 50 -- 6. Ontological and Cognitive Bases of karaka Theory 60 -- 7. 'Force Dynamics' as a Dynamical Sem-antics Model 72 -- METAPHOR -- 8. Body, (...)
     
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  27.  15
    Anne Reboul (2012). Language: Between Cognition, Communication and Culture. Pragmatics and Cognition 20 (2):295-316.
    Everett's main claim is that language is a “cultural tool“, created by hominids for communication and social cohesion. I examine the meaning of the expression “cultural tool“ in terms of the influence of language on culture (i.e. the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis) or of the influence of culture on language (Everett's hypothesis). I show that these hypotheses are not well-supported by evidence and that language and languages, rather than being “cultural tools“ as wholes are rather collections of tools used in (...)
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  28.  42
    Peter J. Richerson & Robert Boyd (2000). Climate, Culture and the Evolution of Cognition. In Celia Heyes & Ludwig Huber (eds.), The Evolution of Cognition. MIT Press 329--45.
    What are the causes of the evolution of complex cognition? Discussions of the evolution of cognition sometimes seem to assume that more complex cognition is a fundamental advance over less complex cognition, as evidenced by a broad trend toward larger brains in evolutionary history. Evolutionary biologists are suspicious of such explanations since they picture natural selection as a process leading to adaptation to local environments, not to progressive trends. Cognitive adaptations will have costs, and more complex (...)
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  29.  13
    Barend van Heusden (2009). Semiotic Cognition and the Logic of Culture. Pragmatics and Cognition 17 (3):611-627.
    In this paper I argue that semiotic cognition is a distinctive form of cognition, which must have evolved out of earlier forms of non-semiotic cognition. Semiotic cognition depends on the use of signs. Signs are understood in terms of a specific organization, or structure, of the cognitive process. Semiotic cognition is a unique form of cognition. Once this form of cognition was available to humans, the semiotic provided the ground structure for an evolutionary (...)
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  30.  3
    A. Stack (2005). Culture, Cognition and Jean Laplanche's Enigmatic Signifier. Theory, Culture and Society 22 (3):63-80.
    Empathy is widely touted as a springboard for social change. Within the academy, ‘identification’ is often used to promote the social value of literary and cultural studies. But to what degree have scholars, in seeking to defend the value of literary and cultural studies, conceived the act of reading in problematic ways? ‘An Ethics of Reading’ argues that adopting a Lacanian paradigm of self and text to discuss the act of textual interpretation reduces a complex event involving multiple actors to (...)
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  31.  1
    Rumen I. Iliev & Bethany L. Ojalehto (2015). Bringing History Back to Culture: On the Missing Diachronic Component in the Research on Culture and Cognition. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  32.  8
    Anna Wierzbicka (1992). Talking About Emotions: Semantics, Culture, and Cognition. Cognition and Emotion 6 (3):285-319.
  33. Felix Warneken & Michael Tomasello (2009). Cognition for Culture. In Murat Aydede & P. Robbins (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition. Cambridge 467--79.
  34. Pascal Boyer (2009). What Are Memories For? Functions of Recall in Cognition and Culture. In Pascal Boyer & James Wertsch (eds.), Memory in Mind and Culture. Cambridge 3--28.
     
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  35. Anne-Marie Reboul (2012). Language: Between Cognition, Communication and Culture. Pragmatics and Cognition 20 (2):295-316.
     
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  36. Anne Reboul (2012). Language: Between Cognition, Communication and Culture. Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 20 (2):295-316.
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  37.  8
    Pascal Boyer (2009). What Are Memories For? Functions of Recall in Cognition and Culture. In Pascal Boyer & James Wertsch (eds.), Memory in Mind and Culture. Cambridge 3.
  38.  9
    Horacio Fabrega, Jr (2005). Biological Evolution of Cognition and Culture: Off Arbib's Mirror-Neuron System Stage? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):131-132.
    Arbib offers a comprehensive, elegant formulation of brain/language evolution; with significant implications for social as well as biological sciences. Important psychological antecedents and later correlates are presupposed; their conceptual enrichment through protosign and protospeech is abbreviated in favor of practical communication. What culture and whether protosign and protospeech involve a protoculture are not considered. Arbib also avoids dealing with the question of evolution of mind, consciousness, and self.
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  39.  7
    Daniel L. Everett (2012). Response to Reboul: Between Cognition, Communication, and Culture. Pragmatics and Cognition 20 (2):392-407.
  40.  3
    Krist Vaesen (2012). From Individual Cognition to Populational Culture. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):245-262.
    In my response to the commentaries from a collection of esteemed researchers, I reassess and eventually find largely intact my claim that human tool use evidences higher social and non-social cognitive ability. Nonetheless, I concede that my examination of individual-level cognitive traits does not offer a full explanation of cumulative culture yet. For that, one needs to incorporate them into population-dynamic models of cultural evolution. I briefly describe my current and future work on this.
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  41.  13
    Horacio Fabrega Jr (2005). Biological Evolution of Cognition and Culture: Off Arbib's Mirror-Neuron System Stage? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):131-132.
    Arbib offers a comprehensive, elegant formulation of brain/language evolution; with significant implications for social as well as biological sciences. Important psychological antecedents and later correlates are presupposed; their conceptual enrichment through protosign and protospeech is abbreviated in favor of practical communication. What culture “is” and whether protosign and protospeech involve a protoculture are not considered. Arbib also avoids dealing with the question of evolution of mind, consciousness, and self.
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  42.  3
    Bernard Rimé (2009). More on the Social Sharing of Emotion: In Defense of the Individual, of Culture, of Private Disclosure, and in Rebuttal of an Old Couple of Ghosts Known as “Cognition and Emotion”. Emotion Review 1 (1):94-96.
    Though the commentaries on my review welcomed its focus on the social dimension of emotion and emotion regulation, they also revealed important misinterpretation. The social standpoint was not developed at the expense of the individual. On the contrary, this perspective is in line with dynamic emotions systems views. Despite variations in modalities, I argue that emotion sharing is universal because it concerns culturally-shaped knowledge and constructions when they are shattered by emotional events. Predictions regarding the recovery effects of private disclosure (...)
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  43.  4
    Mark Schaller (2004). Cognition and Communication in Culture's Evolutionary Landscape. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):748-749.
    Atran & Norenzayan's (A&N's) analysis fits with other perspectives on evoked culture: Cultural beliefs might emerge simply from the fact that people share a common cognitive architecture. But no perspective on culture can be complete without incorporating the unstoppable role of communication. The evolutionary landscape of culture will be most completely mapped by theories that describe specifically how communication translates evolved cognitive canals into cultural beliefs.
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  44. Daniel L. Everett (2012). Response to Reboul: Between Cognition, Communication, and Culture. Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 20 (2):392-407.
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  45. Niall J. L. Griffith (2005). Is Cognition Plus Technology an Unbounded System?: Technology, Representation and Culture. Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 13 (3):583-613.
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  46. Christophe Heintz (2010). Ethnographic Cognition and Writing Culture. In Olaf Zenker & Karsten Kumoll (eds.), Beyond Writing Culture: Current Intersections of Epistemologies and Representational Practices. Berghahn Books
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  47. Barend van Heusden (2009). Semiotic Cognition and the Logic of Culture. Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 17 (3):611-627.
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  48. Lambros Malafouris, Chris Gosden & Karenleigh A. Overmann (2014). Creativity, Cognition and Material Culture: An Introduction. Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 22 (1):1-4.
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  49.  80
    Michael Tomasello, Malinda Carpenter, Josep Call, Tanya Behne & Henrike Moll (2005). Understanding and Sharing Intentions: The Origins of Cultural Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):675-691.
    We propose that the crucial difference between human cognition and that of other species is the ability to participate with others in collaborative activities with shared goals and intentions: shared intentionality. Participation in such activities requires not only especially powerful forms of intention reading and cultural learning, but also a unique motivation to share psychological states with others and unique forms of cognitive representation for doing so. The result of participating in these activities is species-unique forms of cultural (...) and evolution, enabling everything from the creation and use of linguistic symbols to the construction of social norms and individual beliefs to the establishment of social institutions. In support of this proposal we argue and present evidence that great apes understand the basics of intentional action, but they still do not participate in activities involving joint intentions and attention. Human children's skills of shared intentionality develop gradually during the first 14 months of life as two ontogenetic pathways intertwine: the general ape line of understanding others as animate, goal-directed, and intentional agents; and a species-unique motivation to share emotions, experience, and activities with other persons. The developmental outcome is children's ability to construct dialogic cognitive representations, which enable them to participate in earnest in the collectivity that is human cognition. Key Words: collaboration; cooperation; cultural learning; culture; evolutionary psychology; intentions; shared intentionality; social cognition; social learning; theory of mind; joint attention. (shrink)
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  50. Hazel R. Markus & Shinobu Kitayama (1991). Culture and the Self: Implications for Cognition, Emotion, and Motivation. Psychological Review 98 (2):224-253.
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