Search results for 'Cognition physiology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Herve Chneiweiss (2011). Does Cognitive Enhancement Fit with the Physiology of Our Cognition? In Judy Illes & Barbara J. Sahakian (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics. Oxford University Press. 295.score: 120.0
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  2. T. R. Miles (1985). Behavior, Cognition, and Physiology: Three Horses or Two? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):68-69.score: 120.0
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  3. Enrico Pasini (1996). Corpo E Funzioni Cognitive in Leibniz. Franco Angeli.score: 82.0
    The Author attempts to reconstruct Leibniz’s philosophy through the physiology of the processes of perception, inner sense, and general cognition, and their metaphysical implications, using both Leibniz’s published and unpublished works. The volume contains four chapters ("The Young Leibniz", "Thought Mechanisms", "The Means of Perception", "The Functions of Imagination"), and a number of hitherto unpublished texts by Leibniz.
     
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  4. Silvia A. Bunge & Jonathan D. Wallis (eds.) (2008). Neuroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior. Oxford University Press.score: 62.0
    euroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior brings together, for the first time, the experiments and theories that have created the new science of rules. Rules are central to human behavior, but until now the field of neuroscience lacked a synthetic approach to understanding them. How are rules learned, retrieved from memory, maintained in consciousness and implemented? How are they used to solve problems and select among actions and activities? How are the various levels of rules represented in the brain, ranging from simple (...)
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  5. Suzanne Cunningham (1991). A Darwinian Approach to Functionalism. Journal of Philosophical Research 16:145-157.score: 60.0
    I argue against the claim of certain functionalists, like Jerry Fodor, that theories of psychological states ought to abstract from the physiology of the systems that exhibit such states. Taking seriously Darwin’s claim that living organisms struggle to survive, and that their “mental powers” are adaptations that assist them in this struggle, I argue that not only emotions but also paradigm cognitive states like beliefs are intimately bound up with the physiology of the organism and its efforts to (...)
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  6. J. Poolton, R. MasteRs & J. Maxwell (2008). Erratum to “Passing Thoughts on the Evolutionary Stability of Implicit Motor Behaviour: Performance Retention Under Physiological Fatigue” [Consiousness and Cognition, 16, 456–468, 2007]. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):408-408.score: 54.0
  7. Y. Rossetti & G. Rode (2002). Reducing Spatial Neglect by Visual and Other Sensory Manipulations: Non-Cognitive (Physiological) Routes to the Rehabilitation of a Cognitive Disorder. In Hans-Otto Karnath, David Milner & Giuseppe Vallar (eds.), The Cognitive and Neural Bases of Spatial Neglect. Oxford University Press. 375--396.score: 52.0
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  8. Russ McBride (2012). A Framework for Error Correction Under Prediction. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 48.0
    A Framework for Error Correction Under Prediction.
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  9. N. Andreasen (2000). Is Schizophrenia a Disorder of Memory or Consciousness? In Endel Tulving (ed.), Memory, Consciousness, and the Brain: The Tallinn Conference. Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis.score: 48.0
  10. Alfredo Pereira Jr, Maria AliceOrnellas Pereira & FábioAugusto Furlan (2011). Recent Advances in Brain Physiology and Cognitive Processing. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):183.score: 48.0
    The discovery of participation of astrocytes as active elements in glutamatergic tripartite synapses (composed by functional units of two neurons and one astrocyte) has led to the construction of models of cognitive functioning in the human brain, focusing on associative learning, sensory integration, conscious processing and memory formation/retrieval. We have modelled human cognitive functions by means of an ensemble of functional units (tripartite synapses) connected by gap junctions that link distributed astrocytes, allowing the formation of intra- and intercellular calcium waves (...)
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  11. John Sutton (2005). Memory and the Extended Mind: Embodiment, Cognition, and Culture. Cognitive Processing 6:223-226.score: 44.0
    This special issue, which includes papers first presented at two workshops on ‘Memory, Mind, and Media’ in Sydney on November 29–30 and December 2–3, 2004, showcases some of the best interdisciplinary work in philosophy and psychology by memory researchers in Australasia (and by one expatriate Australian, Robert Wilson of the University of Alberta). The papers address memory in many contexts: in dance and under hypnosis, in social groups and with siblings, in early childhood and in the laboratory. Memory is taken (...)
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  12. Michelle Maiese (2011). Embodiment, Emotion, and Cognition. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 44.0
    Machine generated contents note: -- Series Editors' Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- The Essential Embodiment Thesis -- Essentially Embodied, Desire-Based Emotions -- Sense of Self,_Embodiment, and Desire-Based Emotions -- The Role of Emotion in Decision and Moral Evaluation -- Essentially Embodied, Emotive, Enactive Social Cognition -- Breakdowns in Embodied Emotive Cognition -- Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Index.
     
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  13. Peter G. Grossenbacher & Christopher T. Lovelace (2001). Mechanisms of Synesthesia: Cognitive and Physiological Constraints. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):36-41.score: 42.0
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  14. John Thomas Wilke (1981). Personal Identity in the Light of Brain Physiology and Cognitive Psychology. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 6 (3):323-334.score: 40.0
    The concept of the person, and the notion that the latter is an entity separate and distinct from other persons, has persisted as one of the more secure ‘givens’ of philosophical thought. We have very little difficulty, in observer language, in pointing to a person, describing his or her attributes, distinguishing him or her from other persons, etc. Likewise, it is ordinarily not much of a problem to subjectively experience, both sensorially and conceptually, the self – that is, to distinguish (...)
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  15. J. Bickle, C. Worley & M. Bernstein (2000). Vector Subtraction Implemented Neurally: A Neurocomputational Model of Some Sequential Cognitive and Conscious Processes. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (1):117-144.score: 40.0
    Although great progress in neuroanatomy and physiology has occurred lately, we still cannot go directly to those levels to discover the neural mechanisms of higher cognition and consciousness. But we can use neurocomputational methods based on these details to push this project forward. Here we describe vector subtraction as an operation that computes sequential paths through high-dimensional vector spaces. Vector-space interpretations of network activity patterns are a fruitful resource in recent computational neuroscience. Vector subtraction also appears to be (...)
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  16. Michael P. Etgen & Ellen F. Rosen (1993). Cognitive Dissonance: Physiological Arousal in the Performance Expectancy Paradigm. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (3):229-231.score: 40.0
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  17. Stuart I. Offenbach, Wojtek J. Chodzko-Zajko & Robert L. Ringel (1990). Relationship Between Physiological Status, Cognition, and Age in Adult Men. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (2):112-114.score: 40.0
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  18. Frank A. Russo, Naresh N. Vempala & Gillian M. Sandstrom (2013). Predicting Musically Induced Emotions From Physiological Inputs: Linear and Neural Network Models. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 40.0
    Listening to music often leads to physiological responses. Do these physiological responses contain sufficient information to infer emotion induced in the listener? The current study explores this question by attempting to predict judgments of 'felt' emotion from physiological responses alone using linear and neural network models. We measured five channels of peripheral physiology from 20 participants – heart rate, respiration, galvanic skin response, and activity in corrugator supercilii and zygomaticus major facial muscles. Using valence and arousal (VA) dimensions, participants (...)
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  19. [deleted]Stramaglia Sebastiano (2012). Information Flow in Networks and the Law of Diminishing Marginal Returns: Evidence in Human EEG Recordings Across Cognitive and Physiological States. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 40.0
  20. Pereira Alfredo Jr, M. A. Pereira & Fábio Augusto Furlan (2011). Recent Advances in Brain Physiology and Cognitive Processing. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):183-192.score: 40.0
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  21. T. D. Borkovec (1976). Physiological and Cognitive Processes in the Maintenance and Reduction of Fear. In Gary E. Schwartz & D. H. Shapiro (eds.), Consciousness and Self-Regulation. Plenum. 261--308.score: 40.0
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  22. Thomas D. Borkovec (1976). Physiological and Cognitive Processes in the Regulation of Anxiety. In Gary E. Schwartz & D. H. Shapiro (eds.), Consciousness and Self-Regulation. Plenum. 261--312.score: 40.0
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  23. S. I. Offenbach, Wj Chodzkozajko & R. L. Ringel (1986). Relationship Between Age, Physiological Status, and Cognition. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 24 (5):350-350.score: 40.0
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  24. [deleted]Joel Krueger & John Michael (2012). Gestural Coupling and Social Cognition: Möbius Syndrome as a Case Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6 (81):1-14.score: 38.0
    Social cognition researchers have become increasingly interested in the ways that behavioral, physiological, and neural coupling facilitate social interaction and interpersonal understanding. We distinguish two ways of conceptualizing the role of such coupling processes in social cognition: strong and moderate interactionism. According to strong interactionism (SI), low-level coupling processes are alternatives to higher-level individual cognitive processes; the former at least sometimes render the latter superfluous. Moderate interactionism(MI) on the other hand, is an integrative approach. Its guiding assumption is (...)
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  25. Mog Stapleton (2012). Proper Embodiment: The Role of the Body in Affect and Cognition. Dissertation, University of Edinburghscore: 38.0
    Embodied cognitive science has argued that cognition is embodied principally in virtue of grossmorphological and sensorimotor features. This thesis argues that cognition is also internally embodied in affective and fine-grained physiological features whose transformative roles remain mostlyunnoticed in contemporary cognitive science. I call this ‘proper embodiment’. I approach this larger subject by examining various emotion theories in philosophy and psychology. These tend to emphasiseone of the many gross components of emotional processes, such as ‘feeling’ or ‘judgement’ to thedetriment (...)
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  26. Jaime F. Cárdenas-García (2013). Distributed Cognition: An Ectoderm-Centric Perspective. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 6 (3):337-350.score: 38.0
    Distributed cognition is widely recognized as an approach to the study of all cognition. It identifies the distribution of cognitive processes between persons and technology, among people, and across time in the development of the social and material contexts for thinking. This paper suggests an ectoderm-centric perspective as the basis for distributed cognition, and in so doing redefines distributed cognition as the ability of an organism to interact with its environment for the purpose of satisfying its (...)
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  27. Henkjan Honing & Annemie Ploeger (2012). Cognition and the Evolution of Music: Pitfalls and Prospects. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):513-524.score: 38.0
    What was the role of music in the evolutionary history of human beings? We address this question from the point of view that musicality can be defined as a cognitive trait. Although it has been argued that we will never know how cognitive traits evolved (Lewontin, 1998), we argue that we may know the evolution of music by investigating the fundamental cognitive mechanisms of musicality, for example, relative pitch, tonal encoding of pitch, and beat induction. In addition, we show that (...)
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  28. Ben Jeffares (2013). Back to Australopithecus: Utilizing New Theories of Cognition to Understand the Pliocene Hominins. Biological Theory 9 (1):1-12.score: 38.0
    The evolution of cognition literature is dominated by views that presume the evolution of underlying neural structures. However, recent models of cognition reemphasize the role of physiological structures, development, and external resources as important components of cognition. This article argues that these alternative models of cognition challenge our understanding of human cognitive evolution. As a case study, it focuses on rehabilitating bipedalism as a crucial moment in human evolution. The australopithecines are often seen as “merely” bipedal (...)
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  29. Daniel H. Weiss (2013). Embodied Cognition in Classical Rabbinic Literature. Zygon 48 (3):788-807.score: 38.0
    Challenging earlier cognitivist approaches, recent theories of embodied cognition argue that the human mind and its functions are best understood as intimately bound up with the human body and its physiological dimensions. Some scholars have suggested that such theories, in departing from some core assumptions of the Western philosophical tradition, display significant similarities to certain non-Western traditions of thought, such as Buddhism. This essay extends such parallels to the Jewish tradition and argues that, in particular, classical rabbinic thought presents (...)
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  30. A. Berthoz (2008). The Physiology and Phenomenology of Action. Oxford University Press.score: 38.0
    Though many philosophers of mind have taken an interest in the great developments in the brain sciences, the interest is seldom reciprocated by scientists, who frequently ignore the contributions philosophers have made to our understanding of the mind and brain. In a rare collaboration, a world famous brain scientist and an eminent philosopher have joined forces in an effort to understand how our brain interacts with the world. Does the brain behave as a calculator, combining sensory data before deciding how (...)
     
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  31. [deleted]John Michael Joel Krueger (2012). Gestural Coupling and Social Cognition: Möbius Syndrome as a Case Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 38.0
    Social cognition researchers have become increasingly interested in the ways that behavioral, physiological and neural coupling facilitate social interaction and interpersonal understanding. Some researchers endorse strong interactionism (SI), which conceptualizes low-level coupling processes as alternatives to higher-level individual cognitive processes; the former at least sometimes render the latter superfluous. In contrast, we espouse moderate interactionism (MI), which is an integrative approach. Its guiding assumption is that higher-level cognitive processes are likely to have been shaped by the need to coordinate, (...)
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  32. Robyn Barnacle (2009). Gut Instinct: The Body and Learning. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (1):22-33.score: 36.0
    In the current socio-political climate pedagogies consistent with rationalism are in the ascendancy. One way to challenge the purchase of rationalism within educational discourse and practice is through the body, or by re-thinking the nature of mind-body relations. While the orientation of this paper is ultimately phenomenological, it takes as its point of departure recent feminist scholarship, which is demonstrating that attending to physiology can provide insight into the complexity of mind-body relations. Elizabeth Wilson's account of the role of (...)
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  33. Martina Gandola, Gabriella Bottini, Laura Zapparoli, Paola Invernizzi, Margherita Verardi, Roberto Sterzi, Ignazio Santilli, Maurizio Sberna & Eraldo Paulesu (2014). The Physiology of Motor Delusions in Anosognosia for Hemiplegia: Implications for Current Models of Motor Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 24:98-112.score: 36.0
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  34. James W. Garson (1993). Mice in Mirrored Mazes and the Mind. Philosophical Psychology 6 (2):123-34.score: 36.0
    The computational theory of cognition (CTC) holds that the mind is akin to computer software. This article aims to show that CTC is incorrect because it is not able to distinguish the ability to solve a maze from the ability to solve its mirror image. CTC cannot do so because it only individuates brain states up to isomorphism. It is shown that a finer individuation that would distinguish left-handed from right-handed abilities is not compatible with CTC. The view is (...)
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  35. Geoffrey Lloyd (2007). Cognitive Variations: Reflections on the Unity and Diversity of the Human Mind. Clarendon Press.score: 34.0
    Sir Geoffrey Lloyd presents a cross-disciplinary study of the problems posed by the unity and diversity of the human mind. On the one hand, as humans we all share broadly the same anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, and certain psychological capabilities - the capacity to learn a language, for instance. On the other, different individuals and groups have very different talents, tastes, and beliefs, for instance about how they see themselves, other humans and the world around them. These issues are highly (...)
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  36. Thomas Desmidt, Maël Lemoine, Catherine Belzung & Natalie Depraz (2014). The Temporal Dynamic of Emotional Emergence. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (4):557-578.score: 32.0
    Following the neurophenomenological approach, we propose a model of emotional emergence that identifies the experimental structures of time involved in emotional experience and their plausible components in terms of cognition, physiology, and neuroscience. We argue that surprise, as a lived experience, and its physiological correlates of the startle reflex and cardiac defense are the core of the dynamic, and that the heart system sets temporally in motion the dynamic of emotional emergence. Finally, in reference to Craig’s model of (...)
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  37. Robert S. Root-Bernstein (2002). Aesthetic Cognition. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 16 (1):61 – 77.score: 30.0
    The purpose of this article is to integrate two outstanding problems within the philosophy of science. The first concerns what role aesthetics plays in scientific thinking. The second is the problem of how logically testable ideas are generated (the so-called "psychology of research" versus "logic of (dis)proof" problem). I argue that aesthetic sensibility is the basis for what scientists often call intuition, and that intuition in turn embodies (in a literal physiological sense) ways of thinking that have their own meta-logic. (...)
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  38. Helene Sophrin Porte (2000). Neural Constraints on Cognition in Sleep. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):994-995.score: 30.0
    Certain features of Stage NREM sleep – for example, rhythmic voltage oscillation in thalamic neurons – are physiologically inhospitable to “REM sleep processes.” In Stage 2, the sleep spindle and its refractory period must limit the incursion of “covert REM,” and thus the extent of REM-like cognition. If these hyperpolarization-dependent events also inform Stage NREM cognition, does a “1-gen” model suffice to account for REM-NREM differences? [Nielsen].
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  39. Mauro Ursino, Cristiano Cuppini & Elisa Magosso (2010). A Computational Model of the Lexical-Semantic System Based on a Grounded Cognition Approach. Frontiers in Psychology 1:221-221.score: 30.0
    This work presents a connectionist model of the semantic-lexical system based on grounded cognition. The model assumes that the lexical and semantic aspects of language are memorized in two distinct stores. The semantic properties of objects are represented as a collection of features, whose number may vary among objects. Features are described as activation of neural oscillators in different sensory-motor areas (one area for each feature) topographically organized to implement a similarity principle. Lexical items are represented as activation of (...)
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  40. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2000). Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):793-842; 904-1018; 1083-1121.score: 28.0
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are isomorphisms (...)
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  41. Graham A. Jamieson (ed.) (2007). Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press.score: 28.0
    The phenomenon of hypnosis provides a rich paradigm for those seeking to understand the processes that underlie consciousness. Understanding hypnosis tells us about a basic human capacity for altered experiences that is often overlooked in contemporary western societies. Throughout the 200 year history of psychology, hypnosis has been a major topic of investigation by some of the leading experimenters and theorists of each generation. Today hypnosis is emerging again as a lively area of research within cognitive (systems level) neuroscience informing (...)
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  42. Shannon Spaulding (2014). Embodied Cognition and Theory of Mind. In Lawrence Shapiro (ed.), Handbook of Embodied Cognition. Routledge. 197-206.score: 27.0
    According to embodied cognition, the philosophical and empirical literature on theory of mind is misguided. Embodied cognition rejects the idea that social cognition requires theory of mind. It regards the intramural debate between the Theory Theory and the Simulation Theory as irrelevant, and it dismisses the empirical studies on theory of mind as ill conceived and misleading. Embodied cognition provides a novel deflationary account of social cognition that does not depend on theory of mind. In (...)
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  43. Bertram F. Malle (2005). Folk Theory of Mind: Conceptual Foundations of Human Social Cognition. In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. 225-255.score: 27.0
    The human ability to represent, conceptualize, and reason about mind and behavior is one of the greatest achievements of human evolution and is made possible by a “folk theory of mind” — a sophisticated conceptual framework that relates different mental states to each other and connects them to behavior. This chapter examines the nature and elements of this framework and its central functions for social cognition. As a conceptual framework, the folk theory of mind operates prior to any particular (...)
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  44. Stevan Harnad & Itiel Dror (2006). Distributed Cognition: Cognizing, Autonomy and the Turing Test. Pragmatics and Cognition 14 (2):14.score: 27.0
    Some of the papers in this special issue distribute cognition between what is going on inside individual cognizers' heads and their outside worlds; others distribute cognition among different individual cognizers. Turing's criterion for cognition was individual, autonomous input/output capacity. It is not clear that distributed cognition could pass the Turing Test.
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  45. David Kirsh (2005). Metacognition, Distributed Cognition and Visual Design. In Peter Gardenfors, Petter Johansson & N. J. Mahwah (eds.), Cognition, education, and communication technology. Erlbaum Associates. 147--180.score: 27.0
    Metacognition is associated with planning, monitoring, evaluating and repairing performance Designers of elearning systems can improve the quality of their environments by explicitly structuring the visual and interactive display of learning contexts to facilitate metacognition. Typically page layout, navigational appearance, visual and interactivity design are not viewed as major factors in metacognition. This is because metacognition tends to be interpreted as a process in the head, rather than an interactive one. It is argued here, that cognition and metacognition are (...)
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  46. Georg Theiner (2014). Varieties of Group Cognition. In Lawrence Shapiro (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Embodied Cognition. Routledge. 347-357.score: 27.0
    Benjamin Franklin famously wrote that “the good [that] men do separately is small compared with what they may do collectively” (Isaacson 2004). The ability to join with others in groups to accomplish goals collectively that would hopelessly overwhelm the time, energy, and resources of individuals is indeed one of the greatest assets of our species. In the history of humankind, groups have been among the greatest workers, builders, producers, protectors, entertainers, explorers, discoverers, planners, problem-solvers, and decision-makers. During the late 19th (...)
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  47. Lawrence Lengbeyer (2007). Situated Cognition: The Perspect Model. In David Spurrett, Don Ross, Harold Kincaid & Lynn Stephens (eds.), Distributed Cognition and the Will: Individual Volition and Social Context. MIT Press. 227.score: 27.0
    The standard philosophical and folk-psychological accounts of cognition and action credit us with too much spontaneity in our activities and projects. We are taken to be fundamentally active rather than reactive, to project our needs and aims and deploy our full supporting arsenal of cognitive instruments upon an essentially passive environment. The corrected point of view presented here balances this image of active agency with an appreciation of how we are also continually responding to the world, that is, to (...)
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  48. Fred Adams (2010). Embodied Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):619-628.score: 25.0
    Embodied cognition is sweeping the planet. On a non-embodied approach, the sensory system informs the cognitive system and the motor system does the cognitive system’s bidding. There are causal relations between the systems but the sensory and motor systems are not constitutive of cognition. For embodied views, the relation to the sensori-motor system to cognition is constitutive, not just causal. This paper examines some recent empirical evidence used to support the view that cognition is embodied and (...)
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  49. John Sutton, Celia B. Harris, Paul G. Keil & Amanda J. Barnier (2010). The Psychology of Memory, Extended Cognition, and Socially Distributed Remembering. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):521-560.score: 25.0
    This paper introduces a new, expanded range of relevant cognitive psychological research on collaborative recall and social memory to the philosophical debate on extended and distributed cognition. We start by examining the case for extended cognition based on the complementarity of inner and outer resources, by which neural, bodily, social, and environmental resources with disparate but complementary properties are integrated into hybrid cognitive systems, transforming or augmenting the nature of remembering or decision-making. Adams and Aizawa, noting this distinctive (...)
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  50. Mark Reybrouck (2005). A Biosemiotic and Ecological Approach to Music Cognition: Event Perception Between Auditory Listening and Cognitive Economy. [REVIEW] Axiomathes. An International Journal in Ontology and Cognitive Systems. 15 (2):229-266.score: 25.0
    This paper addresses the question whether we can conceive of music cognition in ecosemiotic terms. It claims that music knowledge must be generated as a tool for adaptation to the sonic world and calls forth a shift from a structural description of music as an artifact to a process-like approach to dealing with music. As listeners, we are observers who construct and organize our knowledge and bring with us our observational tools. What matters is not merely the sonic world (...)
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