Search results for 'Cognitions' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Jaak Panksepp (2000). The Neuro-Evolutionary Cusp Between Emotions and Cognitions: Implications for Understanding Consciousness and the Emergence of a Unified Mind Science. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):15-54.
    The neurobiological systems that mediate the basic emotions are beginning to be understood. They appear to be constituted of genetically coded, but experientially refined executive circuits situated in subcortical areas of the brain which can coordinate the behavioral, physiological and psychological processes that need to be recruited to cope with a variety of primal survival needs (i.e., they signal evolutionary fitness issues). These birthrights allow newborn organisms to begin navigating the complexities of the world and to learn about the values (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2.  6
    Michael Berk, Lesley Berk, Seetal Dodd, Felice N. Jacka, Paul B. Fitzgerald, Anthony R. de Castella, Sacha Filia, Kate Filia, Jayashri Kulkarni, Henry J. Jackson & Lesley Stafford (2012). Psychometric Properties of a Scale to Measure Investment in the Sick Role: The Illness Cognitions Scale. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):360-364.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  93
    Patrick Haggard (2005). Conscious Intention and Motor Cognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (6):290-295.
  4.  37
    Wilfried Kunde, Andrea Kiesel & Joachim Hoffman (2003). Conscious Control Over the Content of Unconscious Cognition. Cognition 88 (2):223-242.
  5. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2013). “ ’Scientia Intuitiva’: Spinoza’s Third Kind of Cognition”. In Johannes Haag (ed.), Übergänge - diskursiv oder intuitiv? Essays zu Eckart Förster die 25 Jahre der Philosophie. Klostermann 99-116.
    I am not going to solve in this paper the plethora of problems and riddles surrounding Spinoza’s scientia intuitiva, but I do hope to break some new ground and help make this key doctrine more readily understandable. I will proceed in the following order (keep in mind the word ‘proceed’). I will first provide a close preliminary analysis of the content and development of Spinoza’s discussion of scientia intuitiva in the Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect and the Ethics. (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  57
    Dominik Perler (2005). Emotions and Cognitions. Fourteenth-Century Discussions on the Passions of the Soul. Vivarium 43 (2):250-274.
    Medieval philosophers clearly recognized that emotions are not simply "raw feelings" but complex mental states that include cognitive components. They analyzed these components both on the sensory and on the intellectual level, paying particular attention to the different types of cognition that are involved. This paper focuses on William Ockham and Adam Wodeham, two fourteenth-century authors who presented a detailed account of "sensory passions" and "volitional passions". It intends to show that these two philosophers provided both a structural and a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  32
    Iris M. Yob (1997). The Cognitive Emotions and Emotional Cognitions. Studies in Philosophy and Education 16 (1/2):43-57.
    Israel Scheffler's "In Praise of the Cognitive Emotions" (1977, 1991) extends earlier analyses of the role of emotions in rational undertakings. It shows that some emotions – "rational passions," "perceptive feelings," "theoretical imagination" and "cognitive emotions" – are essentially cognitive in origin and may serve cognitive purposes. Though it analyszes the interplay of emotion and cognition, cognition is the focus and the emotions that are examined revolve about it. This prompts us to wonder about the effect of a "Copernican revolution." (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Amihud Gilead (1999). Human Affects as Properties of Cognitions in Spinoza's Philosophical Psychotherapy. In Yirmiyahu Yovel (ed.). Little Room Press 169--181.
    The Spinozistic essence is the factor of individuation of a particular or individual thing. Affects or emotions are properties of an essence, which, under the attribute of thought, is an idea, i.e., cognition. Such essence is the human mind, which is the idea of a particular actual body. Since our emotions are properties of our cognitions, whether adequate or not, concerning the state of our body, which reflects nature as a whole in a particular way, I entitle Spinoza’s theory (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Andy Clark (2008). Supersizing the Mind: Embodiment, Action, and Cognitive Extension. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction : brainbound versus extended -- From embodiment to cognitive extension -- The active body -- The negotiable body -- Material symbols -- World, Incorporated -- Boundary disputes -- Mind re-bound -- The cure for cognitive hiccups (HEMC, HEC, HEMC ...) -- Rediscovering the brain -- The limits of embodiment -- Painting, planning, and perceiving -- Disentangling embodiment -- Conclusions : mind-sized bites.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   153 citations  
  10. Jerry A. Fodor (1998). Concepts: Where Cognitive Science Went Wrong. Oxford University Press.
    The renowned philosopher Jerry Fodor, a leading figure in the study of the mind for more than twenty years, presents a strikingly original theory on the basic constituents of thought. He suggests that the heart of cognitive science is its theory of concepts, and that cognitive scientists have gone badly wrong in many areas because their assumptions about concepts have been mistaken. Fodor argues compellingly for an atomistic theory of concepts, deals out witty and pugnacious demolitions of rival theories, and (...)
  11.  42
    Hanne de Jaegher, Ezequiel di Paolo & Shaun Gallagher (2010). Can Social Interaction Constitute Social Cognition? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (10):441-447.
    An important shift is taking place in social cognition research, away from a focus on the individual mind and toward embodied and participatory aspects of social understanding. Empirical results already imply that social cognition is not reducible to the workings of individual cognitive mechanisms. To galvanize this interactive turn, we provide an operational definition of social interaction and distinguish the different explanatory roles – contextual, enabling and constitutive – it can play in social cognition. We show that interactive processes are (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   37 citations  
  12. John Sutton, Celia B. Harris, Paul G. Keil & Amanda J. Barnier (2010). The Psychology of Memory, Extended Cognition, and Socially Distributed Remembering. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):521-560.
    This paper introduces a new, expanded range of relevant cognitive psychological research on collaborative recall and social memory to the philosophical debate on extended and distributed cognition. We start by examining the case for extended cognition based on the complementarity of inner and outer resources, by which neural, bodily, social, and environmental resources with disparate but complementary properties are integrated into hybrid cognitive systems, transforming or augmenting the nature of remembering or decision-making. Adams and Aizawa, noting this distinctive complementarity argument, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   23 citations  
  13.  45
    Amanda Seed & Michael Tomasello (2010). Primate Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):407-419.
    As the cognitive revolution was slow to come to the study of animal behavior, the vast majority of what we know about primate cognition has been discovered in the last 30 years. Building on the recognition that the physical and social worlds of humans and their living primate relatives pose many of the same evolutionary challenges, programs of research have established that the most basic cognitive skills and mental representations that humans use to navigate those worlds are already possessed by (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   45 citations  
  14.  93
    Philip E. Tetlock (2003). Thinking the Unthinkable: Sacred Values and Taboo Cognitions. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (7):320-324.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   20 citations  
  15. Richard Menary (2007). Cognitive Integration: Mind and Cognition Unbounded. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In Cognitive Integration: Attacking The Bounds of Cognition Richard Menary argues that the real pay-off from extended-mind-style arguments is not a new form of externalism in the philosophy of mind, but a view in which the 'internal' and 'external' aspects of cognition are integrated into a whole. Menary argues that the manipulation of external vehicles constitutes cognitive processes and that cognition is hybrid: internal and external processes and vehicles complement one another in the completion of cognitive tasks. However, we cannot (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   39 citations  
  16.  41
    Jules Holroyd (2015). Implicit Bias, Awareness and Imperfect Cognitions. Consciousness and Cognition 33:511-523.
  17. Lawrence A. Shapiro (2010). Embodied Cognition. Routledge.
    Introduction: toward an understanding of embodied cognition -- Standard cognitive science -- Challenging standard cognitive science -- Conceptions of embodiment -- Embodied cognition: the conceptualization hypothesis -- Embodied cognition: the replacement hypothesis -- Embodied cognition: the constitution hypothesis -- Concluding thoughts.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   23 citations  
  18.  15
    K. N. Ochsner & J. J. Gross (2005). The Cognitive Control of Emotion. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (5):242-249.
    The capacity to control emotion is important for human adaptation. Questions about the neural bases of emotion regulation have recently taken on new importance, as functional imaging studies in humans have permitted direct investigation of control strategies that draw upon higher cognitive processes difficult to study in nonhumans. Such studies have examined (1) controlling attention to, and (2) cognitively changing the meaning of, emotionally evocative stimuli. These two forms of emotion regulation depend upon interactions between prefrontal and cingulate control systems (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   37 citations  
  19.  38
    Zheng Wang, Jerome R. Busemeyer, Harald Atmanspacher & Emmanuel M. Pothos (2013). The Potential of Using Quantum Theory to Build Models of Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (4):672-688.
    Quantum cognition research applies abstract, mathematical principles of quantum theory to inquiries in cognitive science. It differs fundamentally from alternative speculations about quantum brain processes. This topic presents new developments within this research program. In the introduction to this topic, we try to answer three questions: Why apply quantum concepts to human cognition? How is quantum cognitive modeling different from traditional cognitive modeling? What cognitive processes have been modeled using a quantum account? In addition, a brief introduction to quantum probability (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  20. R. Lanier Anderson (2001). Synthesis, Cognitive Normativity, and the Meaning of Kant's Question, 'How Are Synthetic Cognitions a Priori Possible?'. European Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):275–305.
  21.  64
    Raymond W. Gibbs (2006). Embodiment and Cognitive Science. New York ;Cambridge University Press.
    This book explores how people's subjective, felt experiences of their bodies in action provide part of the fundamental grounding for human cognition and language. Cognition is what occurs when the body engages the physical and cultural world and must be studied in terms of the dynamical interactions between people and the environment. Human language and thought emerge from recurring patterns of embodied activity that constrain ongoing intelligent behavior. We must not assume cognition to be purely internal, symbolic, computational, and disembodied, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   37 citations  
  22.  7
    Demian Whiting (2007). Why Treating Problems in Emotion May Not Require Altering Eliciting Cognitions. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (3):237-246.
  23.  27
    Nicki Marquardt & Rainer Hoeger (2009). The Effect of Implicit Moral Attitudes on Managerial Decision-Making: An Implicit Social Cognition Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):157 - 171.
    This article concerns itself with the relationship between implicit moral cognitions and decisions in the realm of business ethics. Traditionally, business ethics research emphasized the effects of overt or explicit attitudes on ethical decision-making and neglected intuitive or implicit attitudes. Therefore, based on an implicit social cognition approach it is important to know whether implicit moral attitudes may have a substantial impact on managerial ethical decision-making processes. To test this thesis, a study with 50 participants was conducted. In this (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  24. K. Ramakrishna Rao (2005). Perception, Cognition, and Consciousness in Classical Hindu Psychology. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (3):3-30.
    Perception is sensory awareness. Cognition is reflective awareness. Consciousness is awareness-as-such. In Indian psychology, as represented by Samkhya-Yoga and Advaita Vedanta systems, consciousness and mind are fundamentally different. Reality is the composite of being (sat), knowing (cit) and feeling (ananda). Consciousness is the knowledge side of the universe. It is the ground condition of all awareness. Consciousness is not a part or aspect of the mind. Mind is physical and consciousness is not. Consciousness does not interact with the mind, the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25.  2
    Andrew K. MacLeod, Philip Tata, John Kentish & Hanne Jacobsen (1997). Retrospective and Prospective Cognitions in Anxiety and Depression. Cognition and Emotion 11 (4):467-479.
  26.  16
    Joachim Stöber (2000). Prospective Cognitions in Anxiety and Depression: Replication and Methodological Extension. Cognition and Emotion 14 (5):725-729.
  27.  6
    Lisa Bortolotti & Ema Sullivan-Bissett (2015). Costs and Benefits of Imperfect Cognitions. Consciousness and Cognition 33:487-489.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  4
    Daniel Greenleaf Thompson (1878). Presentative and Representative Cognitions. Mind 3 (10):270-276.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  1
    Bethany A. Teachman & Jena Saporito (2009). I Am Going to Gag: Disgust Cognitions in Spider and Blood–Injury–Injection Fears. Cognition and Emotion 23 (2):399-414.
  30.  4
    Lyn Ellett & Paul Chadwick (2007). Paranoid Cognitions, Failure, and Focus of Attention in College Students. Cognition and Emotion 21 (3):558-576.
  31.  4
    Marvin D. Krank & Abby L. Goldstein (2006). Adolescent Changes in Implicit Cognitions and Prevention of Substance Abuse. In Reinout W. Wiers & Alan W. Stacy (eds.), Handbook of Implicit Cognition and Addiction. Sage Publications Ltd 439--453.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  0
    J. Boyle (2001). Reasons for Action: Evaluative Cognitions That Underlie Motivations. American Journal of Jurisprudence 46 (1):177-197.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  33.  44
    Deborah K. W. Modrak (2012). Meaning and Cognition in Plato's Cratylus and Theaetetus. Topoi 31 (2):167-174.
    For Plato, the crucial function of human cognition is to grasp truths. Explaining how we are able to do this is fundamental to understanding our cognitive powers. Plato addresses this topic from several different angles. In the Cratylus and Theaetetus, he attempts to identify the elemental cognitions that are the foundations of language and knowledge. He considers several candidates for this role, most notably, perception and simple meaning-bearing concepts. In the first section, we will look at Plato’s worries about (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  51
    Charles Mercier (1883). Mr. H. Spencer's Classification of Cognitions. Mind 8 (30):260-267.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  24
    Benjamin Trémoulet (2011). The Structure of the Theoretical Power of Judgment. Kant and the Value of Our Empirical Cognitions. Kant-Studien 102 (1):46-68.
    This paper argues that the cognitive status and cognitive value of thoughts should be clarified through a description of the mechanics of the theoretical power of judgment. Three pairs of concepts essentially constitute its tools: 1. determinative and reflective judgments; 2. constitutive and regulative principles; and 3. transcendental and empirical applications. Against the general approach to dealing with these concepts, i.e., against the tendency to consider them as synonymous or as forming a parallel structure, this article sharpens the distinctions between (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  4
    Lumina S. Albert, Scott J. Reynolds & Bulent Turan (2015). Turning Inward or Focusing Out? Navigating Theories of Interpersonal and Ethical Cognitions to Understand Ethical Decision-Making. Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):467-484.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  5
    Gene W. Moser (forthcoming). A Theory of How the Human Memory Codes Information for Delayed Cognitions. Humanitas.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  2
    Alan H. Schoenfeld (1983). Beyond the Purely Cognitive: Belief Systems, Social Cognitions, and Metacognitions As Driving Forces in Intellectual Performance. Cognitive Science 7 (4):329-363.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  28
    Elisa Freschi (2010). Facing the Boundaries of Epistemology: Kumārila on Error and Negative Cognition. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (1):39-48.
    Kumārila’s commitment to the explanation of cognitive experiences not confined to valid cognition alone, allows a detailed discussion of border-line cases (such as doubt and error) and the admittance of absent entities as separate instances of cognitive objects. Are such absent entities only the negative side of positive entities? Are they, hence, fully relative (since a cow could be said to be the absent side of a horse and vice versa)? Through the analysis of a debated passage of the Ślokavārttika (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  4
    Elizabeth Karger (2001). Adam Wodeham on the Intentionality of Cognitions. In Dominik Perler (ed.), Ancient and Medieval Theories of Intentionality. Brill 76--283.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  3
    Jonathan Remue, Jan De Houwer, Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Marie-Anne Vanderhasselt & Rudi De Raedt (2013). Self-Esteem Revisited: Performance on the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure as a Measure of Self- Versus Ideal Self-Related Cognitions in Dysphoria. Cognition and Emotion 27 (8):1441-1449.
  42.  3
    Luc Ciompi & Iaak Panksepp (2005). Energetic Effects of Emotions on Cognitions Complementary Psychobiological. Consciousness and Emotion: Agency, Conscious Choice, and Selective Perception 1:23.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  2
    Iris M. Yob (forthcoming). Cognitive Emotions and Emotional Cognitions in the Arts. Journal of Aesthetic Education.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  6
    Claudia Lorena García (2000). The Falsity of Non-Judgmental Cognitions in Descartes and Suárez. Modern Schoolman 77 (3):199-216.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  10
    Brian M. Hughes (2006). Natural Selection and Religiosity: Validity Issues in the Empirical Examination of Afterlife Cognitions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):477-478.
    Bering's target article proposes that the tendency to believe in an afterlife emerged (in evolutionary history) in response to selective pressures unique to human societies. However, the empirical evidence presented fails to account for the broader social context that impinges upon researcher–participant interactions, and so fails to displace the more parsimonious explanation that it is childhood credulity that underlies the acquisition of afterlife beliefs through cultural exposure.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  2
    Christopher P. Fagundes (2011). Implicit Negative Evaluations About Ex-Partner Predicts Break-Up Adjustment: The Brighter Side of Dark Cognitions. Cognition and Emotion 25 (1):164-173.
  47.  1
    Rachel Karniol & Rachel Ben-Moshe' (1991). Drawing Inferences About Others' Cognitions and Affective Reactions: A Test of Two Models for Representing Affect. Cognition and Emotion 5 (4):241-253.
  48.  1
    Iris M. Yob (1997). The Cognitive Emotions and Emotional Cognitions. Studies in Philosophy and Education 16 (1-2):43-57.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. D. Andriopoulos (2006). Basic Concepts in Greek Sceptic Theories of Cognitions. Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 17 (1-2).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  0
    M. Hughes Brian (2006). Natural Selection and Religiosity: Validity Issues in the Empirical Examination of Afterlife Cognitions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):478.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000