Search results for 'Cognitions' (try it on Scholar)

168 found
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  1.  12
    Lisa Bortolotti & Ema Sullivan-Bissett (2015). Costs and Benefits of Imperfect Cognitions. Consciousness and Cognition 33:487-489.
    Introduction to a special issue of Consciousness and Cognition on the costs and benefits of imperfect cognitions.
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  2. Jaak Panksepp (2000). The Neuro-Evolutionary Cusp Between Emotions and Cognitions: Implications for Understanding Consciousness and the Emergence of a Unified Mind Science. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):15-54.
    The neurobiological systems that mediate the basic emotions are beginning to be understood. They appear to be constituted of genetically coded, but experientially refined executive circuits situated in subcortical areas of the brain which can coordinate the behavioral, physiological and psychological processes that need to be recruited to cope with a variety of primal survival needs (i.e., they signal evolutionary fitness issues). These birthrights allow newborn organisms to begin navigating the complexities of the world and to learn about the values (...)
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  3.  8
    Michael Berk, Lesley Berk, Seetal Dodd, Felice N. Jacka, Paul B. Fitzgerald, Anthony R. de Castella, Sacha Filia, Kate Filia, Jayashri Kulkarni, Henry J. Jackson & Lesley Stafford (2012). Psychometric Properties of a Scale to Measure Investment in the Sick Role: The Illness Cognitions Scale. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):360-364.
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  4.  72
    Dominik Perler (2005). Emotions and Cognitions. Fourteenth-Century Discussions on the Passions of the Soul. Vivarium 43 (2):250-274.
    Medieval philosophers clearly recognized that emotions are not simply "raw feelings" but complex mental states that include cognitive components. They analyzed these components both on the sensory and on the intellectual level, paying particular attention to the different types of cognition that are involved. This paper focuses on William Ockham and Adam Wodeham, two fourteenth-century authors who presented a detailed account of "sensory passions" and "volitional passions". It intends to show that these two philosophers provided both a structural and a (...)
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  5.  34
    Iris M. Yob (1997). The Cognitive Emotions and Emotional Cognitions. Studies in Philosophy and Education 16 (1/2):43-57.
    Israel Scheffler's "In Praise of the Cognitive Emotions" (1977, 1991) extends earlier analyses of the role of emotions in rational undertakings. It shows that some emotions – "rational passions," "perceptive feelings," "theoretical imagination" and "cognitive emotions" – are essentially cognitive in origin and may serve cognitive purposes. Though it analyszes the interplay of emotion and cognition, cognition is the focus and the emotions that are examined revolve about it. This prompts us to wonder about the effect of a "Copernican revolution." (...)
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  6. Amihud Gilead (1999). Human Affects as Properties of Cognitions in Spinoza's Philosophical Psychotherapy. In Yirmiyahu Yovel (ed.). Little Room Press 169--181.
    The Spinozistic essence is the factor of individuation of a particular or individual thing. Affects or emotions are properties of an essence, which, under the attribute of thought, is an idea, i.e., cognition. Such essence is the human mind, which is the idea of a particular actual body. Since our emotions are properties of our cognitions, whether adequate or not, concerning the state of our body, which reflects nature as a whole in a particular way, I entitle Spinoza’s theory (...)
     
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  7. Philip E. Tetlock (2003). Thinking the Unthinkable: Sacred Values and Taboo Cognitions. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (7):320-324.
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  8.  53
    Jules Holroyd (2015). Implicit Bias, Awareness and Imperfect Cognitions. Consciousness and Cognition 33:511-523.
  9. R. Lanier Anderson (2001). Synthesis, Cognitive Normativity, and the Meaning of Kant's Question, 'How Are Synthetic Cognitions a Priori Possible?'. European Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):275–305.
  10.  4
    Andrew K. MacLeod, Philip Tata, John Kentish & Hanne Jacobsen (1997). Retrospective and Prospective Cognitions in Anxiety and Depression. Cognition and Emotion 11 (4):467-479.
  11.  18
    Demian Whiting (2007). Why Treating Problems in Emotion May Not Require Altering Eliciting Cognitions. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (3):237-246.
  12.  21
    Joachim Stöber (2000). Prospective Cognitions in Anxiety and Depression: Replication and Methodological Extension. Cognition and Emotion 14 (5):725-729.
  13.  13
    Claudia Lorena García (2000). The Falsity of Non-Judgmental Cognitions in Descartes and Suárez. Modern Schoolman 77 (3):199-216.
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  14.  12
    Claudia Lorena García (2000). The Falsity of Non-Judgmental Cognitions in Descartes and Suárez. Modern Schoolman 77 (3):199-216.
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  15.  7
    Lyn Ellett & Paul Chadwick (2007). Paranoid Cognitions, Failure, and Focus of Attention in College Students. Cognition and Emotion 21 (3):558-576.
  16.  1
    Bethany A. Teachman & Jena Saporito (2009). I Am Going to Gag: Disgust Cognitions in Spider and Blood–Injury–Injection Fears. Cognition and Emotion 23 (2):399-414.
  17.  55
    Charles Mercier (1883). Mr. H. Spencer's Classification of Cognitions. Mind 8 (30):260-267.
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  18. J. Boyle (2001). Reasons for Action: Evaluative Cognitions That Underlie Motivations. American Journal of Jurisprudence 46 (1):177-197.
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  19.  3
    S. K. Wertz (2015). Leibniz and Culinary Cognitions: A Speculative Journey. Journal of Aesthetic Education 49 (3):83-95.
    We eat not only because it is necessary for us to, but also and much more because eating gives us pleasure.In this essay, I develop a case for G. W. Leibniz as our first modern food philosopher. It is in his theory of perception and in his culinary examples that I find the most convincing evidence, especially when I contrast them with Locke and Hume’s account of perception with reference to food. In the process, Leibniz expanded aesthetic perception to include (...)
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  20.  6
    Marvin D. Krank & Abby L. Goldstein (2006). Adolescent Changes in Implicit Cognitions and Prevention of Substance Abuse. In Reinout W. Wiers & Alan W. Stacy (eds.), Handbook of Implicit Cognition and Addiction. Sage Publications Ltd 439--453.
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  21.  5
    Daniel Greenleaf Thompson (1878). Presentative and Representative Cognitions. Mind 3 (10):270-276.
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  22.  24
    Benjamin Trémoulet (2011). The Structure of the Theoretical Power of Judgment. Kant and the Value of Our Empirical Cognitions. Kant-Studien 102 (1):46-68.
    This paper argues that the cognitive status and cognitive value of thoughts should be clarified through a description of the mechanics of the theoretical power of judgment. Three pairs of concepts essentially constitute its tools: 1. determinative and reflective judgments; 2. constitutive and regulative principles; and 3. transcendental and empirical applications. Against the general approach to dealing with these concepts, i.e., against the tendency to consider them as synonymous or as forming a parallel structure, this article sharpens the distinctions between (...)
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  23.  6
    Lumina S. Albert, Scott J. Reynolds & Bulent Turan (2015). Turning Inward or Focusing Out? Navigating Theories of Interpersonal and Ethical Cognitions to Understand Ethical Decision-Making. Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):467-484.
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  24.  6
    Gene W. Moser (forthcoming). A Theory of How the Human Memory Codes Information for Delayed Cognitions. Humanitas.
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  25.  2
    Alan H. Schoenfeld (1983). Beyond the Purely Cognitive: Belief Systems, Social Cognitions, and Metacognitions As Driving Forces in Intellectual Performance. Cognitive Science 7 (4):329-363.
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  26.  2
    Austin H. Riesen (1978). Responses Versus Cognitions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):594.
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  27.  5
    Elizabeth Karger (2001). Adam Wodeham on the Intentionality of Cognitions. In Dominik Perler (ed.), Ancient and Medieval Theories of Intentionality. Brill 76--283.
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  28.  17
    Brian M. Hughes (2006). Natural Selection and Religiosity: Validity Issues in the Empirical Examination of Afterlife Cognitions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):477-478.
    Bering's target article proposes that the tendency to believe in an afterlife emerged (in evolutionary history) in response to selective pressures unique to human societies. However, the empirical evidence presented fails to account for the broader social context that impinges upon researcher–participant interactions, and so fails to displace the more parsimonious explanation that it is childhood credulity that underlies the acquisition of afterlife beliefs through cultural exposure.
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  29.  4
    Christopher P. Fagundes (2011). Implicit Negative Evaluations About Ex-Partner Predicts Break-Up Adjustment: The Brighter Side of Dark Cognitions. Cognition and Emotion 25 (1):164-173.
  30.  6
    Claudia Lorena García (2000). The Falsity of Non-Judgmental Cognitions in Descartes and Suárez. Modern Schoolman 77 (3):199-216.
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  31.  3
    Rachel Karniol & Rachel Ben-Moshe' (1991). Drawing Inferences About Others' Cognitions and Affective Reactions: A Test of Two Models for Representing Affect. Cognition and Emotion 5 (4):241-253.
  32.  3
    Luc Ciompi & Iaak Panksepp (2005). Energetic Effects of Emotions on Cognitions Complementary Psychobiological. Consciousness and Emotion: Agency, Conscious Choice, and Selective Perception 1:23.
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  33.  3
    Iris M. Yob (forthcoming). Cognitive Emotions and Emotional Cognitions in the Arts. Journal of Aesthetic Education.
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  34.  3
    Jonathan Remue, Jan De Houwer, Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Marie-Anne Vanderhasselt & Rudi De Raedt (2013). Self-Esteem Revisited: Performance on the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure as a Measure of Self- Versus Ideal Self-Related Cognitions in Dysphoria. Cognition and Emotion 27 (8):1441-1449.
  35.  1
    M. Hughes Brian (2006). Natural Selection and Religiosity: Validity Issues in the Empirical Examination of Afterlife Cognitions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):478.
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  36.  1
    Iris M. Yob (1997). The Cognitive Emotions and Emotional Cognitions. Studies in Philosophy and Education 16 (1-2):43-57.
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  37. D. Andriopoulos (2006). Basic Concepts in Greek Sceptic Theories of Cognitions. Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 17 (1-2).
     
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  38. Paul Dunn, Jonathan Farrar & Cass Hausserman (forthcoming). The Influence of Guilt Cognitions on Taxpayers’ Voluntary Disclosures. Journal of Business Ethics.
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  39. R. Gomez & A. Gomez (2002). The Effects of Perceived Maternal Parenting Styles on the Disruptive Behaviors of Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder/Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Mediation by Hostile Biased Social Cognitions. In Serge P. Shohov (ed.), Advances in Psychology Research. Nova Science Publishers 37--55.
     
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  40. Stefan G. Hofmann, Kristen K. Ellard & Greg J. Siegle (2012). Neurobiological Correlates of Cognitions in Fear and Anxiety: A Cognitive–Neurobiological Information-Processing Model. Cognition and Emotion 26 (2):282-299.
  41. Patrick Haggard (2005). Conscious Intention and Motor Cognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (6):290-295.
  42.  42
    Wilfried Kunde, Andrea Kiesel & Joachim Hoffman (2003). Conscious Control Over the Content of Unconscious Cognition. Cognition 88 (2):223-242.
  43.  57
    Zoltán Dienes (2004). Assumptions of Subjective Measures of Unconscious Mental States: Higher Order Thoughts and Bias. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (9):25-45.
    This paper considers two subjective measures of the existence of unconscious mental states - the guessing criterion, and the zero correlation criterion - and considers the assumptions underlying their application in experimental paradigms. Using higher order thought theory the impact of different types of biases on the zero correlation and guessing criteria are considered. It is argued that subjective measures of consciousness can be biased in various specified ways, some of which involve the relation between first order states and second (...)
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  44. Elisabeth Pacherie, Melissa Green & Timothy J. Bayne (2006). Phenomenology and Delusions: Who Put the 'Alien' in Alien Control? Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):566-577.
    Current models of delusion converge in proposing that delusional beliefs are based on unusual experiences of various kinds. For example, it is argued that the Capgras delusion (the belief that a known person has been replaced by an impostor) is triggered by an abnormal affective experience in response to seeing a known person; loss of the affective response to a familiar person’s face may lead to the belief that the person has been replaced by an impostor (Ellis & Young, 1990). (...)
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  45.  19
    Wilfried Kunde, Andrea Kiesel & Joachim Hoffmann (2005). On the Masking and Disclosure of Unconscious Elaborate Processing. A Reply to Van Opstal, Reynvoet, and Verguts (2005). Cognition 97 (1):99-105.
  46.  85
    Vilayanur S. Ramachandran (2004). A Brief Tour of Human Consciousness: From Impostor Poodles to Purple Numbers. Pearson Professional.
  47.  13
    Filip Van Opstal, Bert Reynvoet & Tom Verguts (2005). Unconscious Semantic Categorization and Mask Interactions: An Elaborate Response to Kunde Et Al. (2005). Cognition 97 (1):107-113.
  48. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2013). “ ’Scientia Intuitiva’: Spinoza’s Third Kind of Cognition”. In Johannes Haag (ed.), Übergänge - diskursiv oder intuitiv? Essays zu Eckart Förster die 25 Jahre der Philosophie. Klostermann 99-116.
    I am not going to solve in this paper the plethora of problems and riddles surrounding Spinoza’s scientia intuitiva, but I do hope to break some new ground and help make this key doctrine more readily understandable. I will proceed in the following order (keep in mind the word ‘proceed’). I will first provide a close preliminary analysis of the content and development of Spinoza’s discussion of scientia intuitiva in the Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect and the Ethics. (...)
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  49.  64
    Benjamin W. Libet (2003). Timing of Conscious Experience: Reply to the 2002 Commentaries on Libet's Findings. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):321-331.
  50.  63
    Luc Steels (2003). Language Re-Entrance and the 'Inner Voice'. In Owen Holland (ed.), Journal of Consciousness Studies. Imprint Academic 174-185.
    As soon as we stop talking aloud, we seem to experience a kind of 'inner voice', a steady stream of verbal fragments expressing ongoing thoughts. What kind of information processing structures are required to explain such a phenomenon? Why would an 'inner voice' be useful? How could it have arisen? This paper explores these questions and reports briefly some computational experiments to help elucidate them.
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