Search results for 'Cognitions' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jaak Panksepp (2000). The Neuro-Evolutionary Cusp Between Emotions and Cognitions: Implications for Understanding Consciousness and the Emergence of a Unified Mind Science. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):15-54.score: 14.0
    The neurobiological systems that mediate the basic emotions are beginning to be understood. They appear to be constituted of genetically coded, but experientially refined executive circuits situated in subcortical areas of the brain which can coordinate the behavioral, physiological and psychological processes that need to be recruited to cope with a variety of primal survival needs (i.e., they signal evolutionary fitness issues). These birthrights allow newborn organisms to begin navigating the complexities of the world and to learn about the values (...)
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  2. Michael Berk, Lesley Berk, Seetal Dodd, Felice N. Jacka, Paul B. Fitzgerald, Anthony R. de Castella, Sacha Filia, Kate Filia, Jayashri Kulkarni, Henry J. Jackson & Lesley Stafford (2012). Psychometric Properties of a Scale to Measure Investment in the Sick Role: The Illness Cognitions Scale. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):360-364.score: 14.0
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  3. Patrick Haggard (2005). Conscious Intention and Motor Cognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (6):290-295.score: 12.0
  4. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2013). “ ’Scientia Intuitiva’: Spinoza’s Third Kind of Cognition”. In Johannes Haag (ed.), Übergänge - diskursiv oder intuitiv? Essays zu Eckart Förster die 25 Jahre der Philosophie. Klostermann. 99-116.score: 12.0
    I am not going to solve in this paper the plethora of problems and riddles surrounding Spinoza’s scientia intuitiva, but I do hope to break some new ground and help make this key doctrine more readily understandable. I will proceed in the following order (keep in mind the word ‘proceed’). I will first provide a close preliminary analysis of the content and development of Spinoza’s discussion of scientia intuitiva in the Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect and the Ethics. (...)
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  5. Dominik Perler (2005). Emotions and Cognitions. Fourteenth-Century Discussions on the Passions of the Soul. Vivarium 43 (2):250-274.score: 12.0
    Medieval philosophers clearly recognized that emotions are not simply "raw feelings" but complex mental states that include cognitive components. They analyzed these components both on the sensory and on the intellectual level, paying particular attention to the different types of cognition that are involved. This paper focuses on William Ockham and Adam Wodeham, two fourteenth-century authors who presented a detailed account of "sensory passions" and "volitional passions". It intends to show that these two philosophers provided both a structural and a (...)
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  6. Wilfried Kunde, Andrea Kiesel & Joachim Hoffman (2003). Conscious Control Over the Content of Unconscious Cognition. Cognition 88 (2):223-242.score: 12.0
  7. Iris M. Yob (1997). The Cognitive Emotions and Emotional Cognitions. Studies in Philosophy and Education 16 (1/2):43-57.score: 12.0
    Israel Scheffler's "In Praise of the Cognitive Emotions" (1977, 1991) extends earlier analyses of the role of emotions in rational undertakings. It shows that some emotions – "rational passions," "perceptive feelings," "theoretical imagination" and "cognitive emotions" – are essentially cognitive in origin and may serve cognitive purposes. Though it analyszes the interplay of emotion and cognition, cognition is the focus and the emotions that are examined revolve about it. This prompts us to wonder about the effect of a "Copernican revolution." (...)
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  8. Amihud Gilead (1999). Human Affects as Properties of Cognitions in Spinoza's Philosophical Psychotherapy. In Yirmiyahu Yovel (ed.). Little Room Press. 169--181.score: 12.0
    The Spinozistic essence is the factor of individuation of a particular or individual thing. Affects or emotions are properties of an essence, which, under the attribute of thought, is an idea, i.e., cognition. Such essence is the human mind, which is the idea of a particular actual body. Since our emotions are properties of our cognitions, whether adequate or not, concerning the state of our body, which reflects nature as a whole in a particular way, I entitle Spinoza’s theory (...)
     
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  9. K. Ramakrishna Rao (2005). Perception, Cognition, and Consciousness in Classical Hindu Psychology. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (3):3-30.score: 10.0
    Perception is sensory awareness. Cognition is reflective awareness. Consciousness is awareness-as-such. In Indian psychology, as represented by Samkhya-Yoga and Advaita Vedanta systems, consciousness and mind are fundamentally different. Reality is the composite of being (sat), knowing (cit) and feeling (ananda). Consciousness is the knowledge side of the universe. It is the ground condition of all awareness. Consciousness is not a part or aspect of the mind. Mind is physical and consciousness is not. Consciousness does not interact with the mind, the (...)
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  10. R. Lanier Anderson (2001). Synthesis, Cognitive Normativity, and the Meaning of Kant's Question, 'How Are Synthetic Cognitions a Priori Possible?'. European Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):275–305.score: 10.0
  11. Michael Joseph Fletcher (2011). The Cognitive Significance of Kant's Third Critique. Dissertation, University of California, Santa Barbarascore: 10.0
    This dissertation aims at forging an archetectonic link between Kant's first and third Critiques within a cognitive-semantic framework. My aim is to show how the major conceptual innovations of Kant’s third Critique can be plausibly understood in terms of the theoretical aims of the first, (Critique of Pure Reason). However, unlike other cognition-oriented approaches to Kant's third Critique, which take the point of contact between the first and third Critique's to be the first Critique's Transcendental Analytic, I link these two (...)
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  12. Deborah K. W. Modrak (2012). Meaning and Cognition in Plato's Cratylus and Theaetetus. Topoi 31 (2):167-174.score: 10.0
    For Plato, the crucial function of human cognition is to grasp truths. Explaining how we are able to do this is fundamental to understanding our cognitive powers. Plato addresses this topic from several different angles. In the Cratylus and Theaetetus, he attempts to identify the elemental cognitions that are the foundations of language and knowledge. He considers several candidates for this role, most notably, perception and simple meaning-bearing concepts. In the first section, we will look at Plato’s worries about (...)
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  13. Elisa Freschi (2010). Facing the Boundaries of Epistemology: Kumārila on Error and Negative Cognition. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (1):39-48.score: 10.0
    Kumārila’s commitment to the explanation of cognitive experiences not confined to valid cognition alone, allows a detailed discussion of border-line cases (such as doubt and error) and the admittance of absent entities as separate instances of cognitive objects. Are such absent entities only the negative side of positive entities? Are they, hence, fully relative (since a cow could be said to be the absent side of a horse and vice versa)? Through the analysis of a debated passage of the Ślokavārttika (...)
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  14. Benjamin Trémoulet (2011). The Structure of the Theoretical Power of Judgment. Kant and the Value of Our Empirical Cognitions. Kant-Studien 102 (1):46-68.score: 10.0
    This paper argues that the cognitive status and cognitive value of thoughts should be clarified through a description of the mechanics of the theoretical power of judgment. Three pairs of concepts essentially constitute its tools: 1. determinative and reflective judgments; 2. constitutive and regulative principles; and 3. transcendental and empirical applications. Against the general approach to dealing with these concepts, i.e., against the tendency to consider them as synonymous or as forming a parallel structure, this article sharpens the distinctions between (...)
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  15. Nicki Marquardt & Rainer Hoeger (2009). The Effect of Implicit Moral Attitudes on Managerial Decision-Making: An Implicit Social Cognition Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):157 - 171.score: 10.0
    This article concerns itself with the relationship between implicit moral cognitions and decisions in the realm of business ethics. Traditionally, business ethics research emphasized the effects of overt or explicit attitudes on ethical decision-making and neglected intuitive or implicit attitudes. Therefore, based on an implicit social cognition approach it is important to know whether implicit moral attitudes may have a substantial impact on managerial ethical decision-making processes. To test this thesis, a study with 50 participants was conducted. In this (...)
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  16. Brian M. Hughes (2006). Natural Selection and Religiosity: Validity Issues in the Empirical Examination of Afterlife Cognitions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):477-478.score: 10.0
    Bering's target article proposes that the tendency to believe in an afterlife emerged (in evolutionary history) in response to selective pressures unique to human societies. However, the empirical evidence presented fails to account for the broader social context that impinges upon researcher–participant interactions, and so fails to displace the more parsimonious explanation that it is childhood credulity that underlies the acquisition of afterlife beliefs through cultural exposure.
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  17. Demian Whiting (2007). Why Treating Problems in Emotion May Not Require Altering Eliciting Cognitions. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (3):237-246.score: 10.0
  18. Lyn Ellett & Paul Chadwick (2007). Paranoid Cognitions, Failure, and Focus of Attention in College Students. Cognition and Emotion 21 (3):558-576.score: 10.0
  19. Claudia Lorena García (2000). The Falsity of Non-Judgmental Cognitions in Descartes and Suárez. The Modern Schoolman 77 (3):199-216.score: 10.0
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  20. Elizabeth Karger (2001). Adam Wodeham on the Intentionality of Cognitions. In Dominik Perler (ed.), Ancient and Medieval Theories of Intentionality. Brill. 76--283.score: 10.0
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  21. Gene W. Moser (forthcoming). A Theory of How the Human Memory Codes Information for Delayed Cognitions. Humanitas.score: 10.0
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  22. Jonathan Remue, Jan De Houwer, Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Marie-Anne Vanderhasselt & Rudi De Raedt (2013). Self-Esteem Revisited: Performance on the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure as a Measure of Self- Versus Ideal Self-Related Cognitions in Dysphoria. Cognition and Emotion 27 (8):1441-1449.score: 10.0
  23. Philip E. Tetlock (2003). Thinking the Unthinkable: Sacred Values and Taboo Cognitions. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (7):320-324.score: 10.0
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  24. Iris M. Yob (forthcoming). Cognitive Emotions and Emotional Cognitions in the Arts. Journal of Aesthetic Education.score: 10.0
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  25. Luc Ciompi & Iaak Panksepp (2005). Energetic Effects of Emotions on Cognitions Complementary Psychobiological. Consciousness and Emotion: Agency, Conscious Choice, and Selective Perception 1:23.score: 10.0
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  26. Christopher P. Fagundes (2011). Implicit Negative Evaluations About Ex-Partner Predicts Break-Up Adjustment: The Brighter Side of Dark Cognitions. Cognition and Emotion 25 (1):164-173.score: 10.0
  27. Rachel Karniol & Rachel Ben-Moshe' (1991). Drawing Inferences About Others' Cognitions and Affective Reactions: A Test of Two Models for Representing Affect. Cognition and Emotion 5 (4):241-253.score: 10.0
  28. Andrew K. MacLeod, Philip Tata, John Kentish & Hanne Jacobsen (1997). Retrospective and Prospective Cognitions in Anxiety and Depression. Cognition and Emotion 11 (4):467-479.score: 10.0
  29. Charles Mercier (1883). Mr. H. Spencer's Classification of Cognitions. Mind 8 (30):260-267.score: 10.0
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  30. Alan H. Schoenfeld (1983). Beyond the Purely Cognitive: Belief Systems, Social Cognitions, and Metacognitions As Driving Forces in Intellectual Performance. Cognitive Science 7 (4):329-363.score: 10.0
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  31. Joachim Stöber (2000). Prospective Cognitions in Anxiety and Depression: Replication and Methodological Extension. Cognition and Emotion 14 (5):725-729.score: 10.0
  32. Bethany A. Teachman & Jena Saporito (2009). I Am Going to Gag: Disgust Cognitions in Spider and Blood–Injury–Injection Fears. Cognition and Emotion 23 (2):399-414.score: 10.0
  33. Iris M. Yob (1997). The Cognitive Emotions and Emotional Cognitions. Studies in Philosophy and Education 16 (1-2):43-57.score: 10.0
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  34. Lumina S. Albert, Scott J. Reynolds & Bulent Turan (forthcoming). Turning Inward or Focusing Out? Navigating Theories of Interpersonal and Ethical Cognitions to Understand Ethical Decision-Making. Journal of Business Ethics.score: 10.0
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  35. J. Boyle (2001). Reasons for Action: Evaluative Cognitions That Underlie Motivations. American Journal of Jurisprudence 46 (1):177-197.score: 10.0
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  36. M. Hughes Brian (2006). Natural Selection and Religiosity: Validity Issues in the Empirical Examination of Afterlife Cognitions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):478.score: 10.0
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  37. R. Gomez & A. Gomez (2002). The Effects of Perceived Maternal Parenting Styles on the Disruptive Behaviors of Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder/Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Mediation by Hostile Biased Social Cognitions. In Serge P. Shohov (ed.), Advances in Psychology Research. Nova Science Publishers. 37--55.score: 10.0
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  38. Stefan G. Hofmann, Kristen K. Ellard & Greg J. Siegle (2012). Neurobiological Correlates of Cognitions in Fear and Anxiety: A Cognitive–Neurobiological Information-Processing Model. Cognition and Emotion 26 (2):282-299.score: 10.0
  39. Marvin D. Krank & Abby L. Goldstein (2006). Adolescent Changes in Implicit Cognitions and Prevention of Substance Abuse. In Reinout W. Wiers & Alan W. Stacy (eds.), Handbook of Implicit Cognition and Addiction. Sage Publications Ltd. 439--453.score: 10.0
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  40. Austin H. Riesen (1978). Responses Versus Cognitions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):594.score: 10.0
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  41. Daniel Greenleaf Thompson (1878). Presentative and Representative Cognitions. Mind 3 (10):270-276.score: 10.0
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  42. Fred Adams (2010). Embodied Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):619-628.score: 9.0
    Embodied cognition is sweeping the planet. On a non-embodied approach, the sensory system informs the cognitive system and the motor system does the cognitive system’s bidding. There are causal relations between the systems but the sensory and motor systems are not constitutive of cognition. For embodied views, the relation to the sensori-motor system to cognition is constitutive, not just causal. This paper examines some recent empirical evidence used to support the view that cognition is embodied and raises questions about some (...)
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  43. John Sutton, Celia B. Harris, Paul G. Keil & Amanda J. Barnier (2010). The Psychology of Memory, Extended Cognition, and Socially Distributed Remembering. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):521-560.score: 9.0
    This paper introduces a new, expanded range of relevant cognitive psychological research on collaborative recall and social memory to the philosophical debate on extended and distributed cognition. We start by examining the case for extended cognition based on the complementarity of inner and outer resources, by which neural, bodily, social, and environmental resources with disparate but complementary properties are integrated into hybrid cognitive systems, transforming or augmenting the nature of remembering or decision-making. Adams and Aizawa, noting this distinctive complementarity argument, (...)
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  44. Mog Stapleton (2013). Steps to a "Properly Embodied" Cognitive Science. Cognitive Systems Research 22 (June):1-11.score: 9.0
    Cognitive systems research has predominantly been guided by the historical distinction between emotion and cognition, and has focused its efforts on modelling the “cognitive” aspects of behaviour. While this initially meant modelling only the control system of cognitive creatures, with the advent of “embodied” cognitive science this expanded to also modelling the interactions between the control system and the external environment. What did not seem to change with this embodiment revolution, however, was the attitude towards affect and emotion in cognitive (...)
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  45. Uriah Kriegel (2011). Cognitive Phenomenology as the Basis of Unconscious Content. In T. Bayne & M. Montague (eds.), Cognitive Phenomenology. Oxford University Press. 79--102.score: 9.0
    Since the seventies, it has been customary to assume that intentionality is independent of consciousness. Recently, a number of philosophers have rejected this assumption, claiming intentionality is closely tied to consciousness, inasmuch as non- conscious intentionality in some sense depends upon conscious intentionality. Within this alternative framework, the question arises of how to account for unconscious intentionality, and different authors have offered different accounts. In this paper, I compare and contrast four possible accounts of unconscious intentionality, which I call potentialism, (...)
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  46. Carrie Figdor (2011). Semantics and Metaphysics in Informatics: Toward an Ontology of Tasks (a Reply to Lenartowicz Et Al. 2010, Towards an Ontology of Cognitive Control). Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):222-226.score: 9.0
    This article clarifies three principles that should guide the development of any cognitive ontology. First, that an adequate cognitive ontology depends essentially on an adequate task ontology; second, that the goal of developing a cognitive ontology is independent of the goal of finding neural implementations of the processes referred to in the ontology; and third, that cognitive ontologies are neutral regarding the metaphysical relationship between cognitive and neural processes.
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  47. Leon De Bruin & Sanneke De Haan (2012). Enactivism and Social Cognition: In Search for the Whole Story. Journal of Cognitive Semiotics (1):225-250.score: 9.0
    Although the enactive approach has been very successful in explaining many basic social interactions in terms of embodied practices, there is still much work to be done when it comes to higher forms of social cognition. In this article, we discuss and evaluate two recent proposals by Shaun Gallagher and Daniel Hutto that try to bridge this ‘cognitive gap’ by appealing to the notion of narrative practice. Although we are enthusiastic about these proposals, we argue that (i) it is difficult (...)
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  48. Shannon Spaulding (forthcoming). Embodied Cognition and Theory of Mind. In Lawrence Shapiro (ed.), Handbook of Embodied Cognition. Routledge.score: 9.0
    According to embodied cognition, the philosophical and empirical literature on theory of mind is misguided. Embodied cognition rejects the idea that social cognition requires theory of mind. It regards the intramural debate between the Theory Theory and the Simulation Theory as irrelevant, and it dismisses the empirical studies on theory of mind as ill conceived and misleading. Embodied cognition provides a novel deflationary account of social cognition that does not depend on theory of mind. In this chapter, l describe embodied (...)
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  49. Claudia Lorena García (2007). Cognitive Modularity, Biological Modularity and Evolvability. Biological Theory: Integrating Development, Evolution and Cognition (KLI) 2 (1):62-73.score: 9.0
    There is an argument that has recently been deployed in favor of thinking that the mind is mostly (or even exclusively) composed of cognitive modules; an argument that draws from some ideas and concepts of evolutionary and of developmental biology. In a nutshell, the argument concludes that a mind that is massively composed of cognitive mechanisms that are cognitively modular (henceforth, c-modular) is more evolvable than a mind that is not c-modular (or that is scarcely c-modular), since a cognitive mechanism (...)
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  50. Russell Epstein (2000). The Neural-Cognitive Basis of the Jamesian Stream of Thought. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (4):550-575.score: 9.0
    William James described the stream of thought as having two components: (1) a nucleus of highly conscious, often perceptual material; and (2) a fringe of dimly felt contextual information that controls the entry of information into the nucleus and guides the progression of internally directed thought. Here I examine the neural and cognitive correlates of this phenomenology. A survey of the cognitive neuroscience literature suggests that the nucleus corresponds to a dynamic global buffer formed by interactions between different regions of (...)
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