Search results for 'Cognitive Processes' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Frank van der Velde & Marc de Kamps (2002). Synchrony in the Eye of the Beholder: An Analysis of the Role of Neural Synchronization in Cognitive Processes. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (3):291-312.score: 240.0
    We discuss the role of synchrony of activationin higher-level cognitive processes. Inparticular, we analyze the question of whethersynchrony of activation provides a mechanismfor compositional representation in neuralsystems. We will argue that synchrony ofactivation does not provide a mechanism forcompositional representation in neural systems.At face value, one can identify a level ofcompositional representation in the models thatintroduce synchrony of activation for thispurpose. But behavior in these models isalways produced by means conjunctiverepresentations in the form of coincidencedetectors. Therefore, models that (...)
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  2. Robert W. Kentridge & Charles A. Heywood (2001). Attention and Alerting: Cognitive Processes Spared in Blindsight. In Beatrice De Gelder, Edward H. F. De Haan & Charles A. Heywood (eds.), Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes. Oxford University Press. 163-181.score: 216.0
  3. Joseph M. Notterman (2000). Note on Reductionism in Cognitive Psychology: Reification of Cognitive Processes Into Mind, Mind-Brain Equivalence, and Brain-Computer Analogy. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 20 (2):116-121.score: 210.0
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  4. John J. Furedy & Karl Schiffman (1973). Concurrent Measurement of Autonomic and Cognitive Processes in a Test of the Traditional Discriminative Control Procedure for Pavlovian Electrodermal Conditioning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (1):210.score: 210.0
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  5. Luis Emilio Bruni (2008). Hierarchical Categorical Perception in Sensing and Cognitive Processes. Biosemiotics 1 (1):113-130.score: 186.0
    This article considers categorical perception (CP) as a crucial process involved in all sort of communication throughout the biological hierarchy, i.e. in all of biosemiosis. Until now, there has been consideration of CP exclusively within the functional cycle of perception–cognition–action and it has not been considered the possibility to extend this kind of phenomena to the mere physiological level. To generalise the notion of CP in this sense, I have proposed to distinguish between categorical perception (CP) and categorical sensing (CS) (...)
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  6. Tobias Egner & Amir Raz (2007). Cognitive Control Processes and Hypnosis. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 29-50.score: 186.0
  7. Mark Rowlands (1999). The Body in Mind: Understanding Cognitive Processes. Cambridge University Press.score: 184.0
    In this book, Mark Rowlands challenges the Cartesian view of the mind as a self-contained monadic entity, and offers in its place a radical externalist or environmentalist model of cognitive processes. Drawing on both evolutionary theory and a detailed examination of the processes involved in perception, memory, thought and language use, Rowlands argues that cognition is, in part, a process whereby creatures manipulate and exploit relevant objects in their environment. This innovative book provides a foundation for an (...)
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  8. James Virtel & Gualtiero Piccinini (2010). Are Prototypes and Exemplars Used in Distinct Cognitive Processes? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):226 - 227.score: 180.0
    We argue that Machery provides no convincing evidence that prototypes and exemplars are typically used in distinct cognitive processes. This partially undermines the fourth tenet of the Heterogeneity Hypothesis and thus casts doubts on Machery’s way of splitting concepts into different kinds. Although Machery may be right that concepts split into different kinds, such kinds may be different from those countenanced by the Heterogeneity Hypothesis.
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  9. Graeme S. Halford, William H. Wilson & Steven Phillips (1998). Relational Complexity Metric is Effective When Assessments Are Based on Actual Cognitive Processes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):848-860.score: 180.0
    The core issue of our target article concerns how relational complexity should be assessed. We propose that assessments must be based on actual cognitive processes used in performing each step of a task. Complexity comparisons are important for the orderly interpretation of research findings. The links between relational complexity theory and several other formulations, as well as its implications for neural functioning, connectionist models, the roles of knowledge, and individual and developmental differences, are considered.
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  10. Ulrich Hoffrage (2000). Why the Analyses of Cognitive Processes Matter. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (5):679-680.score: 180.0
    Stanovich & West analyze individual differences with respect to response output (e.g., participants' numerical estimates). They do not analyze the underlying cognitive processes that led to the outputs; they thereby probably misclassify some non-normative responses as normative. Using base rate neglect and overconfidence as examples, I demonstrate the advantages of analyzing cognitive processes further.
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  11. Ralph L. Holloway (2012). Language and Tool Making Are Similar Cognitive Processes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):226-226.score: 180.0
    Design features for language and stone toolmaking (not tool use) involve similar if not homologous cognitive processes. Both are arbitrary transformations of internal symbolization, whereas non-human tool using is mostly an iconic transformation. The major discontinuity between humans and non-humans (chimpanzees) is language. The presence of stone tools made to standardized patterns suggests communicative and social control skills that involved language.
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  12. Luca Pezzullo (2002). Cheating Neuropsychologists: A Study of Cognitive Processes Involved in Scientific Anomalies Resolution. Mind and Society 3 (1):43-50.score: 180.0
    This research was carried out to explore some of the cognitive processes involved in scientific anomalies resolution. 40 subjects with a good neuropsychology expertise were asked to explain two (invented) anomalous neuropsychological cases. The subjects' efforts to give a meaningful structure to the data were recorded, and the resulting reasoning blocks were analysed to extract and compute the inferential (deductive, inductive and abductive) and analogical processes used. The processes were intercorrelated to experimentally verify the co-occurrence of (...)
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  13. Lin Xiao, Gilly Koritzky, C. Anderson Johnson & Antoine Bechara (2013). The Cognitive Processes Underlying Affective Decision-Making Predicting Adolescent Smoking Behaviors in a Longitudinal Study. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 180.0
    This study investigates the relationship between three different cognitive processes underlying the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and adolescent smoking behaviors in a longitudinal study. We conducted a longitudinal study of 181 Chinese adolescents in Chengdu City, China. The participants were followed from 10th grade to 11th grade. When they were in the 10th grade (Time 1), we tested these adolescents’ decision-making using the Iowa Gambling Task and working memory capacity using the Self-ordered Pointing Test (SOPT). Self-report questionnaires were (...)
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  14. Daniel Strüber Christoph S. Herrmann, Stefan Rach, Toralf Neuling (2013). Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation: A Review of the Underlying Mechanisms and Modulation of Cognitive Processes. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 180.0
    Brain oscillations of different frequencies have been associated with a variety of cognitive functions. Convincing evidence supporting those associations has been provided by studies using intracranial stimulation, pharmacological interventions and lesion studies. The emergence of novel non-invasive brain stimulation techniques like repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) now allows to modulate brain oscillations directly. Particularly, tACS offers the unique opportunity to causally link brain oscillations of a specific frequency range to cognitive processes, (...)
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  15. Peter Fazekas, Tagging the World : Descrying Consciousness in Cognitive Processes.score: 174.0
    Although having conscious experiences is a fundamental feature of our everyday life, our understanding of what consciousness is is very limited. According to one of the main conclusions of contemporary philosophy of mind, the qualitative aspect of consciousness seems to resist functionalisation, i.e. it cannot be adequately defined solely in terms of functional or causal roles, which leads to an epistemic gap between phenomenal and scientific knowledge. Phenomenal qualities, then, seem to be, in principle, unexplainable in scientific terms. As a (...)
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  16. Andrea Pozzali (2007). Can Tacit Knowledge Fit Into a Computer Model of Scientific Cognitive Processes? The Case of Biotechnology. Mind and Society 6 (2):211-224.score: 168.0
    This paper tries to express a critical point of view on the computational turn in philosophy by looking at a specific field of study: philosophy of science. The paper starts by briefly discussing the main contributions that information and communication technologies have given to the rising of computational philosophy of science, and in particular to the cognitive modelling approach. The main question then arises, concerning how computational models can cope with the presence of tacit knowledge in science. Would it (...)
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  17. E. A. Haggard (1943). Experimental Studies in Affective Processes: I. Some Effects of Cognitive Structure and Active Participation on Certain Autonomic Reactions During and Following Experimentally Induced Stress. Journal of Experimental Psychology 33 (4):257.score: 168.0
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  18. Georges Vignaux (1992). From Negation to ?Notion?: Cognitive Processes and Argumentative Strategies. [REVIEW] Argumentation 6 (1):29-39.score: 168.0
    This article deals with the role of negation as a language and cognitive operation. Such a topic is treated here within the framework of the argumentative strategies which consist in making certain cognitive landmarks of the discourse ‘flip over’ with the intent of imposing the necessity to choose between two types of ‘notions’, aiming at the transformation of this choice into an ‘implication’. The reference here to the Aristotelian logic of Prior Analytics appears to be more efficient than (...)
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  19. Rosanna K. Olsen, Sandra N. Moses, Lily Riggs & Jennifer D. Ryan (2012). The Hippocampus Supports Multiple Cognitive Processes Through Relational Binding and Comparison. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 162.0
    It has been well established that the hippocampus plays a pivotal role in explicit long-term recognition memory. However, findings from amnesia, lesion and recording studies with non-human animals, eye-movement recording studies, and functional neuroimaging have recently converged upon a similar message: the functional reach of the hippocampus extends far beyond explicit recognition memory. Damage to the hippocampus affects performance on a number of cognitive tasks including recognition memory after short and long delays and visual discrimination. Additionally, with the advent (...)
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  20. Russell A. Poldrack (2006). Can Cognitive Processes Be Inferred From Neuroimaging Data? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):59-63.score: 160.0
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  21. James P. Crutchfield (1998). Dynamical Embodiments of Computation in Cognitive Processes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):635-635.score: 158.0
    Dynamics is not enough for cognition, nor it is a substitute for information-processing aspects of brain behavior. Moreover, dynamics and computation are not at odds, but are quite compatible. They can be synthesized so that any dynamical system can be analyzed in terms of its intrinsic computational components.
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  22. Leo R. Ward (2003). Synchronous Neural Oscillations and Cognitive Processes. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7:553-559.score: 156.0
  23. John A. Smith (2006). Qualitative Complexity: Ecology, Cognitive Processes and the Re-Emergence of Structures in Post-Humanist Social Theory. Routledge.score: 156.0
    Qualitative Complexity offers a critique of the humanist paradigm in contemporary social theory. Drawing from sources in sociology, philosophy, complexity theory, 'fuzzy logic', systems theory, cognitive science and evolutionary biology, the authors present a new series of interdisciplinary perspectives on the sociology of complex, self-organizing structures.
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  24. Victoria F. Shaw (1996). The Cognitive Processes in Informal Reasoning. Thinking and Reasoning 2 (1):51 – 80.score: 156.0
    Two experiments investigated the factors that people consider when evaluating informal arguments in newspaper and magazine editorials. Experiment 1 showed that subjects were more likely to object to the truth of the premises and the conclusions of an argument than to the strength of the link between them. Experiment 1 also revealed two manipulations that helped subjects object to the link between premises and conclusions: rating how well the premises support the conclusions and rating the believability of the premises and (...)
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  25. Tiago V. Maia Guillermo Horga (2012). Conscious and Unconscious Processes in Cognitive Control: A Theoretical Perspective and a Novel Empirical Approach. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 156.0
    Controlled processing is often referred to as “voluntary” or “willful” and therefore assumed to depend entirely on conscious processes. Recent studies using subliminal-priming paradigms, however, have started to question this assumption. Specifically, these studies have shown that subliminally presented stimuli can induce adjustments in control. Such findings are not immediately reconcilable with the view that conscious and unconscious processes are separate, with each having its own neural substrates and modus operandi. We propose a different theoretical perspective that suggests (...)
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  26. John A. Bargh, Kay L. Schwader, Sarah E. Hailey, Rebecca L. Dyer & Erica J. Boothby (2012). Automaticity in Social-Cognitive Processes. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (12):593-605.score: 156.0
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  27. Terry E. Goldberg & Daniel R. Weinberger (2004). Genes and the Parsing of Cognitive Processes. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (7):325-335.score: 156.0
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  28. Lawrence M. Ward (2003). Synchronous Neural Oscillations and Cognitive Processes. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (12):553-559.score: 156.0
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  29. Gordon M. Burghardt (2002). Genetics, Plasticity, and the Evolution of Cognitive Processes. In Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.), The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. Mit Press. 115--122.score: 156.0
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  30. Frini Karayanidis, Lisa Rebecca Whitson, Andrew Heathcote & Patricia T. Michie (2011). Variability in Proactive and Reactive Cognitive Control Processes Across the Adult Lifespan. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 156.0
    Task-switching paradigms produce a highly consistent age-related increase in mixing cost (longer RT on repeat trials in mixed-task than single task blocks) but a less consistent age effect on switch cost (longer RT on switch than repeat trials in mixed-task blocks). We use two approaches to examine the adult lifespan trajectory of control processes contributing to mixing cost and switch cost: latent variables derived from an evidence accumulation model of choice, and event-related potentials (ERP) that temporally differentiate proactive (cue-driven) (...)
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  31. Ken Manktelow (2001). Representing High-Level Cognitive Processes. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (9):405.score: 156.0
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  32. J. Fossella & M. I. Posner (2004). Genes and the Development of Neural Networks Underlying Cognitive Processes. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. Mit Press. 1255--66.score: 156.0
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  33. Wolfgang Klimesch (1999). Books Etcetera-Brain Function and Oscillations II: Integrative Brain Function. Neurophysiology and Cognitive Processes. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (6):207-215.score: 156.0
     
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  34. Wolfgang Klimesch (1999). Brain Function and Oscillations, Vol. II: Integrative Brain Function. Neurophysiology and Cognitive Processes, Edited by Erol Basar. [REVIEW] Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (6):244-244.score: 156.0
     
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  35. S. P. Liversedge & J. M. Findlay (2000). Eye Movements Reflect Cognitive Processes. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4:6-14.score: 156.0
     
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  36. Stephen P. Turner (1989). Tacit Knowledg and the Problem of Computer Modelling Cognitive Processes in Science. In Steve Fuller (ed.), The Cognitive Turn: Sociological and Psychological Perspectives on Science. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 156.0
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  37. William R. Uttal (2001). The New Phrenology: The Limits of Localizing Cognitive Processes in the Brain. MIT Press.score: 154.0
  38. Markus Lappe Roman Liepelt, Anna Stenzel (2012). Specifying Social Cognitive Processes with a Social Dual-Task Paradigm. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 154.0
    Automatic imitation tasks measuring motor priming effects showed that we directly map observed actions of other agents onto our own motor repertoire (direct matching). A recent joint-action study using a social dual-task paradigm provided evidence for task monitoring. In the present study, we aimed to test a) if automatic imitation is disturbed during joint action and b) if task monitoring is content or time dependent. We used a social dual task that was made of an automatic imitation task (Person 1: (...)
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  39. G. Caldwell & L. Riby (2007). The Effects of Music Exposure and Own Genre Preference on Conscious and Unconscious Cognitive Processes: A Pilot ERP Study. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):992-996.score: 152.0
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  40. Donna Bryce & Daniel Bratzke (2014). Introspective Reports of Reaction Times in Dual-Tasks Reflect Experienced Difficulty Rather Than Timing of Cognitive Processes. Consciousness and Cognition 27:254-267.score: 152.0
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  41. Robert Kozma (2001). Fragmented Attractor Boundaries in the KIII Model of Sensory Information Processing: A Potential Evidence of Cantor Encoding in Cognitive Processes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):820-821.score: 152.0
    Spatio-temporal neuro-dynamics is a quickly developing field of brain research and Tsuda's work is a significant contribution toward establishing theoretical foundations in this area. It is conceivable that the fragmented attractor landscapes and dynamical memory patterns identified earlier in various K-sets are biologically plausible manifestations of attractor ruins, chaotic itinerancy, and Cantor encoding as applied to sensory information processing.
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  42. Claire Petitmengin, Anne Remillieux, Béatrice Cahour & Shirley Carter-Thomas (2013). A Gap in Nisbett and Wilson's Findings? A First-Person Access to Our Cognitive Processes. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):654-669.score: 152.0
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  43. Jutta Joormann & Catherine D'Avanzato (2010). Emotion Regulation in Depression: Examining the Role of Cognitive Processes: Cognition & Emotion Lecture at the 2009 ISRE Meeting. Cognition and Emotion 24 (6):913-939.score: 152.0
  44. Richard E. Petty, Joseph R. Priester & Duane T. Wegener (1994). Cognitive Processes in Attitude Change. In R. Wyer & T. Srull (eds.), Handbook of Social Cognition. Lawrence Erlbaum. 2--69.score: 152.0
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  45. Geneviève Caelen-Haumont (1993). Cognitive Processes and Prosodic Encoding. Speaker's Adaptation to Discourse Conditions. Communication and Cognition-Artificial Intelligence 10 (4).score: 152.0
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  46. Wayne C. Drevets & Marcus E. Raichle (1998). Reciprocal Suppression of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow During Emotional Versus Higher Cognitive Processes: Implications for Interactions Between Emotion and Cognition. Cognition and Emotion 12 (3):353-385.score: 152.0
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  47. Alice F. Healy (1981). Cognitive Processes in Reading Text. Cognition 10 (1-3):119-126.score: 152.0
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  48. R. E. Petty, J. R. Priester & D. T. Wegener (1994). Cognitive Processes in Persuasion. In R. Wyer & T. Srull (eds.), Handbook of Social Cognition. Lawrence Erlbaum. 63--149.score: 152.0
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  49. Reinout W. Wiers, Katrijn Houben, Fren Ty Smulders, Patricia J. Conrod & Barry T. Jones (2006). To Drink or Not to Drink: The Role of Automatic and Controlled Cognitive Processes in the Etiology of Alcohol-Related Problems. In Reinout W. Wiers & Alan W. Stacy (eds.), Handbook of Implicit Cognition and Addiction. Sage Publications Ltd.score: 152.0
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  50. William R. Uttal (2002). Précis of the New Phrenology: The Limits of Localizing Cognitive Processes in the Brain. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (2):221-228.score: 150.0
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