Search results for 'Cognitive Significance' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Vojislav Bozickovic (2008). Cognitive Significance and Reflexive Content. Linguistics and Philosophy 31 (5):545-554.score: 240.0
    John Perry has urged that a semantic theory for natural languages ought to be concerned with the issue of cognitive significance—of how true identity statements containing different (utterances of) indexicals and proper names can be informative, held to be unaccountable by the referentialist view. The informativeness that he has in mind—one that has puzzled Frege, Kaplan and Wettstein—concerns knowledge about the world. In trying to solve this puzzle on referentialist terms, he comes up with the notion of (...) significance as a special kind of a second-order content which should account for cognitive significance in the former sense. Focusing on his treatment of perceptual demonstratives, I argue that he fails to do so both on the level of second-order contents containing demonstrative utterances and on the level of second-order contents containing perceptual buffers as new notions associated with the perceptions and used to temporarily store ideas we gain from the perceptions, which he holds to be causally connected to each other. (shrink)
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  2. Pieranna Garavaso (2001). Why the New Theorist May Still Need to Explain Cognitive Significance but Not Mind Doing It. Philosophia 28 (1-4):455-465.score: 240.0
    In "Has Semantics Rested on a Mistake?", Howard Wettstein denies that semantics must account for cognitive significance. He thus rejects Frege's condition of adequacy for semantics and rids the new theorists from seemingly intractable puzzles. In a more recent article, Wettstein claims that not only reference but even cognitive significance is not a matter of how the referent is presented to the mind of the speaker. In this paper, I submit that the crucial element in the (...)
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  3. Michael Joseph Fletcher (2011). The Cognitive Significance of Kant's Third Critique. Dissertation, University of California, Santa Barbarascore: 192.0
    This dissertation aims at forging an archetectonic link between Kant's first and third Critiques within a cognitive-semantic framework. My aim is to show how the major conceptual innovations of Kant’s third Critique can be plausibly understood in terms of the theoretical aims of the first, (Critique of Pure Reason). However, unlike other cognition-oriented approaches to Kant's third Critique, which take the point of contact between the first and third Critique's to be the first Critique's Transcendental Analytic, I link these (...)
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  4. Ted Poston (2014). Direct Phenomenal Beliefs, Cognitive Significance, and the Specious Present. Philosophical Studies 168 (2):483-489.score: 160.0
    Chalmers (The character of consciousness, 2010) argues for an acquaintance theory of the justification of direct phenomenal beliefs. A central part of this defense is the claim that direct phenomenal beliefs are cognitively significant. I argue against this. Direct phenomenal beliefs are justified within the specious present, and yet the resources available with the present ‘now’ are so impoverished that it barely constrains the content of a direct phenomenal belief. I argue that Chalmers’s account does not have the resources for (...)
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  5. Eric Arnau, Anna Estany, Rafael González del Solar & Thomas Sturm (2014). The Extended Cognition Thesis: Its Significance for the Philosophy of (Cognitive) Science. Philosophical Psychology 27 (1):1-18.score: 156.0
    While the extended cognition (EC) thesis has gained more followers in cognitive science and in the philosophy of mind and knowledge, our main goal is to discuss a different area of significance of the EC thesis: its relation to philosophy of science. In this introduction, we outline two major areas: (I) The role of the thesis for issues in the philosophy of cognitive science, such as: How do notions of EC figure in theories or research programs in (...)
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  6. David LaBerge & Ray Kasevich (2013). The Cognitive Significance of Resonating Neurons in the Cerebral Cortex. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1523-1550.score: 152.0
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  7. David S. Miall (2005). Beyond Interpretation: The Cognitive Significance of Reading. In Harri Veivo, Bo Pettersson & Merja Polvinen (eds.), Cognition and Literary Interpretation in Practice. Yliopistopaino.score: 152.0
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  8. David M. Braun (2002). Cognitive Significance, Attitude Ascriptions, and Ways of Believing Propositions. Philosophical Studies 108 (1-2):65-81.score: 150.0
    We use names to talk about objects. We use predicates to talk about properties and relations. We use sentences to attribute properties and relations to objects. We say things when we utter sentences, often things we believe.
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  9. Ronald Loeffler (2001). Demonstrative Reference and Cognitive Significance. Synthese 128 (3):229 - 244.score: 150.0
  10. Eros Corazza & Jérôme Dokic (1992). On the Cognitive Significance of Indexicals. Philosophical Studies 66 (2):183 - 196.score: 150.0
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  11. William W. Taschek (1987). Content, Character, and Cognitive Significance. Philosophical Studies 52 (2):161--189.score: 150.0
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  12. Howard Wettstein (1988). Cognitive Significance Without Cognitive Content. Mind 97 (385):1-28.score: 150.0
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  13. John Perry (1988). Symposium Papers, Comments, and an Abstract: Cognitive Significance and New Theories of Reference. Noûs 22 (1):1-18.score: 150.0
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  14. Kenneth A. Taylor (1995). Meaning, Reference and Cognitive Significance. Mind and Language 10 (1-2):129-180.score: 150.0
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  15. Gustav Bergmann (1951). Comments on Professor Hempel's "the Concept of Cognitive Significance". Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 80:78--86.score: 150.0
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  16. Gerald W. Casenave (1979). Taking Metaphor Seriously: The Implications of the Cognitive Significance of Metaphor for Theories of Language. Southern Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):19-25.score: 150.0
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  17. Theodore M. Greene (1938). Beauty and the Cognitive Significance of Art. Journal of Philosophy 35 (14):365-381.score: 150.0
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  18. Thomas Uebel (2011). Beyond the Formalist Criterion of Cognitive Significance: Philipp Frank's Later Antimetaphysics. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (1):47-72.score: 150.0
  19. María José Alcaraz León (2011). Contrary Feelings and the Cognitive Significance of Art. Estetika:63-80.score: 150.0
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  20. William H. Hay (1952). Review: Hans Reichenbach, The Verifiability Theory of Meaning; Carl G. Hempel, The Concept of Cognitive Significance: A Reconsideration; Gustav Bergmann, Comments on Professor Hempel's "The Concept of Cognitive Significance.". [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 17 (2):134-136.score: 150.0
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  21. J. Justus (2006). Cognitive Significance. In J. Pfeifer & Sahotra Sarkar (eds.), The Philosophy of Science: An Encyclopedia. Psychology Press. 1--131.score: 150.0
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  22. Andrew Whiteley Magrath (2013). Carnap Ponders Canberra: Creating a Theory of Meaning Based on Carnap's Criteria of Cognitive Significance and the Canberra Plan. Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (3):429-433.score: 150.0
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  23. R. C. Majhi (1997). John Perry on Cognitive Significance. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 24:225-236.score: 150.0
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  24. John Perry (1988). Cognitive Significance and New Theories of Reference. Noûs 22 (1):1-18.score: 150.0
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  25. Raphael van Riel (2011). Cognitive Significance and Epistemic Intensions. Logique Et Analyse 54 (216).score: 150.0
  26. Howard Wettstein, Home About Us Contact Cognitive Significance Without Cognitive Content People Courses Colloquia Conference News/Events.score: 150.0
    Imagine how it must appear to the Martian making his first visit to earth. Let us suppose that he too is an intel­ligent being whose intelligence has, however, evolved without the mediation of language, but rather, say, through the develop­ment of ESP. So he is some­thing like the angels who, according to St. Thomas, can see things directly in their essences and communi­cate thought without language. What is the first thing he notices about earthlings? That they are forever making mouthy (...)
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  27. Beverly Kracher & Robert P. Marble (2008). The Significance of Gender in Predicting the Cognitive Moral Development of Business Practitioners Using the Sociomoral Reflection Objective Measure. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (4):503 - 526.score: 144.0
    This study constitutes a contribution to the discussion about moral reasoning in business. Kohlberg’s (1971, in Cognitive Development and Epistemology (Academic Press, New York), 1976, in Moral Development and Behavior: Theory and Research and Social Issues (Holt, Rienhart and Winston, New York)) cognitive moral development (CMD) theory is one explanation of moral reasoning. One unresolved debate on the topic of CMD is the charge that Kohlbergian-type CMD theory is gender biased. This research puts forth the proposal that the (...)
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  28. Declan Smithies (2013). The Significance of Cognitive Phenomenology. Philosophy Compass 8 (8):731-743.score: 138.0
    This is the second in a series of two articles that serve as an introduction to recent debates about cognitive phenomenology. Cognitive phenomenology can be defined as the experience that is associated with cognitive activities, such as thinking, reasoning, and understanding. What is at issue in contemporary debates is not the existence of cognitive phenomenology, so defined, but rather its nature and theoretical role. The first article examines questions about the nature of cognitive phenomenology, while (...)
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  29. M. Bernstein & J. Bickle (2000). Fusing Significance Coding with the Stream of Cognitive and Conscious Sequences: Generalizing From a Neurocomputational Model of Motivated Saccadic Eye Movements. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S74 - S75.score: 122.0
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  30. Douglas B. Rasmussen (1994). The Significance for Cognitive Realism of the Thought of John Poinsot. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 68 (3):409-424.score: 120.0
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  31. Eric Arnau, Anna Estany, Rafael González del Solar & Thomas Sturm (2013). The Extended Cognition Thesis: Its Significance for the Philosophy of (Cognitive) Science. Philosophical Psychology 27 (1):1-18.score: 120.0
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  32. [deleted]Baker Travis (2011). Functional Significance of Human Prefrontal Theta Oscillations During Cognitive Control and Learning. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 120.0
  33. Sanford Goldberg (2008). Must Differences in Cognitive Value Be Transparent? Erkenntnis 69 (2):165 - 187.score: 114.0
    Frege’s ‘differential dubitability’ test is a test for differences in cognitive value: if one can rationally believe that p while simultaneously doubting that q, then the contents p and q amount to different ‘cognitive values’. If subject S is rational, does her simultaneous adoption of different attitudes towards p and q require that the difference between p and q (as cognitive values) be transparent to her? It is natural to think so. But I argue that, if attitude (...)
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  34. Sebastian Lutz, Criteria of Empirical Significance: A Success Story.score: 96.0
    The sheer multitude of criteria of empirical significance has been taken as evidence that the pre-analytic notion being explicated is too vague to be useful. I show instead that a significant number of these criteria—by Ayer, Popper, Przełęcki, Suppes, and David Lewis, among others—not only form a coherent whole, but also connect directly to the theory of definition, the notion of empirical content as explicated by Ramsey sentences, and the theory of measurement; two criteria by Carnap and Sober are (...)
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  35. Albert Atkin (2008). Peirce, Perry and the Lost History of Critical Referentialism. Philosophia 36 (3):313-326.score: 90.0
    This paper traces a lost genealogical connection between Charles S. Peirce’s later theory of signs and contemporary work in the philosophy of language by John Perry. As is shown, despite some differences, both accounts offer what might be termed a multi-level account of meaning. Moreover, it is claimed that by adopting a ‘Peircian turn’ in his theory, Perry might overcome alleged shortcomings in his account of cognitive significance.
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  36. Alberto Voltolini (1998). Cognitively Contentless Significance as Semantic Content. Lingua E Stile 33:413-426.score: 90.0
    Some years ago, Howard Wettstein provided an original defense of the New Theory of Reference (NTR), the doctrine that singular terms such as names and indexicals are directly referential terms (DRTs), contributing only their reference to the truth-conditions of the tokened sentence they occur in. Wettstein maintained that in order to be semantically adequate, NTR does not have to account for what he calls Frege’s data on cognitive significance, those puzzling facts about language that prompt one to think (...)
     
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  37. Jeffrey S. Poland & Barbara Von Eckardt (2004). Mechanism and Explanation in Cognitive Neuroscience. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):972-984.score: 66.0
    The aim of this paper is to examine the usefulness of the Machamer, Darden, and Craver (2000) mechanism approach to gaining an understanding of explanation in cognitive neuroscience. We argue that although the mechanism approach can capture many aspects of explanation in cognitive neuroscience, it cannot capture everything. In particular, it cannot completely capture all aspects of the content and significance of mental representations or the evaluative features constitutive of psychopathology.
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  38. Martin J. Pickering & Nick Chater (1995). Why Cognitive Science is Not Formalized Folk Psychology. Minds and Machines 5 (3):309-337.score: 66.0
    It is often assumed that cognitive science is built upon folk psychology, and that challenges to folk psychology are therefore challenges to cognitive science itself. We argue that, in practice, cognitive science and folk psychology treat entirely non-overlapping domains: cognitive science considers aspects of mental life which do not depend on general knowledge, whereas folk psychology considers aspects of mental life which do depend on general knowledge. We back up our argument on theoretical grounds, and also (...)
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  39. Zailin Zhang (2009). Theories of Family in Ancient Chinese Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (3):343-359.score: 66.0
    Unlike traditional Western philosophy, which places no special emphasis on the importance of family structure, traditional Chinese philosophy represented by Confucianism is a set of theories that give family a primary position. With family as the foundation, a complete framework of “human body → two genders → family and clan” is formed. Therefore, family in Chinese philosophy is existent, gender-interactive and diachronic. It should also be noted that family also plays a fundamental role in Chinese theories on cosmology, religion, and (...)
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  40. Kent Johnson (2004). Gold's Theorem and Cognitive Science. Philosophy of Science 70 (4):571-592.score: 66.0
    A variety of inaccurate claims about Gold's Theorem have appeared in the cognitive science literature. I begin by characterizing the logic of this theorem and its proof. I then examine several claims about Gold's Theorem, and I show why they are false. Finally, I assess the significance of Gold's Theorem for cognitive science.
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  41. James A. Van Slyke (ed.) (2012). Theology and the Science of Moral Action: Virtue Ethics, Exemplarity, and Cognitive Neuroscience. Routledge.score: 66.0
    More particularly, the book evaluates the concept of moral exemplarity and its significance in philosophical and theological ethics as well as for ongoing research programs in the cognitive sciences.
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  42. Michael Caie (2012). Belief and Indeterminacy. Philosophical Review 121 (1):1-54.score: 60.0
    An attractive approach to the semantic paradoxes holds that cases of semantic pathology give rise to indeterminacy. What attitude should a rational agent have toward a proposition that it takes to be indeterminate in this sense? Orthodoxy holds that rationality requires that an agent disbelieve such a proposition. I argue that a rational agent should be such that it is indeterminate whether it believes the proposition in question. For rational agents, indeterminacy in the objects of their attitudes will filter up (...)
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  43. Heimir Geirsson (1996). Partial Propositions and Cognitive Content. Journal of Philosophical Research 21:117-128.score: 60.0
    Recently there has been a surge of new Fregeans who claim that the direct designation theory, as understood by contemporary Russellians, does not, and cannot, account for the different cognitive significance of statements containing different but codesignative names or indexicals. Instead, they say we must use a fine grained notion of propositions; one which builds a mode of presentation into proposition in addition to including in them the object referred to by the name or indexical in the sentence (...)
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  44. Mark Wilson (2006). Wandering Significance: An Essay on Conceptual Behavior. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 58.0
    Mark Wilson presents a highly original and broad-ranging investigation of the way we get to grips with the world conceptually, and the way that philosophical problems commonly arise from this. He combines traditional philosophical concerns about human conceptual thinking with illuminating data derived from a large variety of fields including physics and applied mathematics, cognitive psychology, and linguistics. Wandering Significance offers abundant new insights and perspectives for philosophers of language, mind, and science, and will also reward the interest (...)
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  45. [deleted]Annette Sterr Philip J. A. Dean (2013). Long-Term Effects of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury on Cognitive Performance. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 58.0
    Although a proportion of individuals report chronic cognitive difficulties after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), results from behavioural testing have been inconsistent. In fact, the variability inherent to the mTBI population may be masking subtle cognitive deficits. We hypothesised that this variability could be reduced by accounting for post-concussion syndrome (PCS) in the sample. 36 participants with mTBI (>1 year post-injury) and 36 non-head injured controls performed information processing speed (Paced Visual Serial Addition Task, PVSAT) and working memory (...)
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  46. Wayne C. Drevets Kymberly D. Young, Kristine Erickson (2012). Differential Effects of Emotionally Versus Neutrally Cued Autobiographical Memories on Performance of a Subsequent Cognitive Task: Effects of Task Difficulty. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 58.0
    Attention is a limited resource, and in order to improve processing of the attended information, competing processes must be suppressed. Although it is well established that an experimentally induced change in mood state comprises one type of competing process that can impair performance on a subsequent task, no study has investigated whether an emotionally valenced autobiographical memory (AM) also can alter performance on a subsequent task. We therefore examined the effects of AM recall on cognitive performance. Healthy participants (n=20 (...)
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  47. Johan de Smedt & Helen de Cruz (2011). A Cognitive Approach to the Earliest Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (4):379-389.score: 54.0
    This paper takes a cognitive perspective to assess the significance of some Late Palaeolithic artefacts (sculptures and engraved objects) for philosophicalconcepts of art. We examine cognitive capacities that are necessary to produceand recognize objects that are denoted as art. These include the ability toattribute and infer design (design stance), the ability to distinguish between themateriality of an object and its meaning (symbol-mindedness), and an aesthetic sensitivity to some perceptual stimuli. We investigate to what extent thesecognitive processes played (...)
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  48. David Enoch (2010). Cognitive Biases and Moral Luck. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (3):372-386.score: 54.0
    Some of the recent philosophical literature on moral luck attempts to make headway in the moral-luck debate by employing the resources of empirical psychology, in effect arguing that some of the intuitive judgments relevant to the moral-luck debate are best explained - and so presumably explained away - as the output of well-documented cognitive biases. We argue that such attempts are empirically problematic, and furthermore that even if they were not, it is still not at all clear what philosophical (...)
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  49. Gregory R. Peterson (2010). Are Evolutionary/Cognitive Theories of Religion Relevant for Philosophy of Religion? Zygon 45 (3):545-557.score: 54.0
    Biological theories of religious belief are sometimes understood to undermine the very beliefs they are describing, proposing an alternative explanation for the causes of belief different from that given by religious believers themselves. This article surveys three categories of biological theorizing derived from evolutionary biology, cognitive science of religion, and neuroscience. Although each field raises important issues and in some cases potential challenges to the legitimacy of religious belief, in most cases the significance of these theories for the (...)
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  50. Gila Sher & Cory D. Wright (2007). Truth as a Normative Modality of Cognitive Acts. In Geo Siegwart & Dirk Griemann (eds.), Truth and Speech Acts: Studies in the Philosophy of Language. Routledge. 5--280.score: 54.0
    Attention to the conversational role of alethic terms seems to dominate, and even sometimes exhaust, many contemporary analyses of the nature of truth. Yet, because truth plays a role in judgment and assertion regardless of whether alethic terms are expressly used, such analyses cannot be comprehensive or fully adequate. A more general analysis of the nature of truth is therefore required – one which continues to explain the significance of truth independently of the role alethic terms play in discourse. (...)
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