Search results for 'Cognitive Therapy' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Kim Diaz & Edward Murguia (2015). The Philosophical Foundations of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Stoicism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Existentialism. Journal of Evidence-Based Psychotherapies 15 (1):39-52.
    In this study, we examine the philosophical bases of one of the leading clinical psychological methods of therapy for anxiety, anger, and depression, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). We trace this method back to its philosophical roots in the Stoic, Buddhist, Taoist, and Existentialist philosophical traditions. We start by discussing the tenets of CBT, and then we expand on the philosophical traditions that ground this approach. Given that CBT has had a clinically measured positive effect on the psychological (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  35
    Donald Robertson (2010). The Philosophy of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (Cbt): Stoic Philosophy as Rational and Cognitive Psychotherapy. Karnac.
    Pt. I. Philosophy and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) -- Ch. 1. The "philosophical origins" of CBT -- Ch. 2. The beginning of modern cognitive therapy -- Ch. 3. A brief history of philosophical therapy -- Ch. 4. Stoic philosophy and psychology -- Ch. 5. Rational emotion in stoicism and CBT -- Ch. 6 Stoicism and Ellis's rational therapy (REBT) -- Pt. II. The stoic armamentarium -- Ch. 7. Contemplation of the ideal stage -- Ch. 8. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3.  17
    Michael McEachrane (2009). Capturing Emotional Thoughts: The Philosophy of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy. In Ylva Gustafsson, Camilla Kronqvist & Michael McEachrane (eds.), Emotions and Understanding: Wittgensteinian Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan
    This chapter examines two premises of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) - that emotions are caused by beliefs and that those beliefs are represented in the mind as words or images. Being a philosophical examination, the chapter also seeks to demonstrate that these two premises essentially are philosophical premises. The chapter begins with a brief methodological suggestion of how to properly evaluate the theory of CBT. From there it works it way from examining the therapeutic practice of capturing the mental (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  7
    Ron Morstyn (2015). Merleau-Ponty’s “Nightmare” and the Rise of Cognitive Behavior Therapy as a Turning Away From the Truth of Traumatic Adversity. Chiasmi International 17:177-186.
    Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), is a therapy based on cognitive manipulation which denies the existence of ontological truth. Merleau-Ponty warned of such a development which he labelled a “decadent psychoanalysis.” Merleau-Ponty believed in the existence of ontological truth, not as a matter of cognitive representation nor as something that can be designated by positive indices such as those of psychometric measures or statistical analysis, but as an ontological dimension of the pre-cognitive world. Openness to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Giuseppe Butera (2011). Thomas Aquinas and Cognitive Therapy: An Exploration of the Promise of the Thomistic Psychology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (4):347-366.
    In his classic introduction to the subject, Cognitive Therapy and the Emotional Disorders, Aaron Beck observes that “the philosophical underpinnings” of cognitive therapy’s (CT) approach to the emotional disorders “go back thousands of years, certainly to the time of the Stoics, who considered man’s conceptions (or misconceptions) of events rather than the events themselves as the key to his emotional upsets” (Beck 1976, 3). But beyond acknowledging that the stoics anticipated the central insight of CT, Beck (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  6.  46
    Richard Gilpin (2008). The Use of Theravada Buddhist Practices and Perspectives in Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy. Contemporary Buddhism 9 (2):227-251.
    This study explores and assesses the nature and practice of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) from the perspective of Therav?da Buddhism. It is particularly concerned with how both models of training understand and apply ?mindfulness?. The approach here is, firstly, to examine how the Therav?da understands and employs mindfulness and, secondly, to explore, and more accurately contextualize, the work of MBCT. The evaluation of MBCT in terms of the Therav?da suggests the former has both a strong affinity with, as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  7.  9
    Melanie Fennell & Zindel Segal (2011). Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy: Culture Clash or Creative Fusion? Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):125--142.
    Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy creates an unlikely partnership, between the ancient tradition of mindfulness meditation rooted in Buddhist thought, and the much more recent and essentially western tradition of cognitive and clinical science. This article investigates points of congruence and difference between the two traditions and concludes that, despite first appearances, this is a fruitful partnership which may well endure.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8. Ann Hackmann, James Bennett-Levy & Emily A. Holmes (eds.) (2011). Oxford Guide to Imagery in Cognitive Therapy. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Imagery is one of the new, exciting frontiers in cognitive therapy. From the outset of cognitive therapy, its founder Dr. Aaron T. Beck recognised the importance of imagery in the understanding and treatment of patient's problems. However, despite Beck's prescience, clinical research on imagery, and the integration of imagery interventions into clinical practice, developed slowly. It is only in the past 10 years that most writing and research on imagery in cognitive therapy has been (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9. James Bennett-Levy, Gillian Butler, Melanie Fennell, Ann Hackmann, Martina Mueller & David Westbrook (eds.) (2004). Oxford Guide to Behavioural Experiments in Cognitive Therapy. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Behavioural experiments are one of the central and most powerful methods of intervention in cognitive therapy. Yet until now, there has been no volume specifically dedicated to guiding physicians who wish to design and implement behavioural experiments across a wide range of clinical problems.The Oxford Guide to Behavioural Experiments in Cognitive Therapy fills this gap. It is written by clinicians for clinicians. It is a practical, easy to read handbook, which is relevant for practising clinicians at (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  6
    Donald P. Moss (1992). Cognitive Therapy, Phenomenology, and the Struggle for Meaning. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 23 (1):87-102.
    This article critiques the inadequate attention given to the question of meaning in mainstream clinical psychiatry and psychology. The author reviews the history of phenomenological and existential psychiatry, especially the work of Erwin Straus, and highlights the emphasis on the personal world of experience and on such existential dimensions as time and ethical experience. Aaron Beck's school of cognitive therapy appropriates many themes and concepts from phenomenology, including the central concept of meaning, and turns them into a systematic (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  15
    Laura Y. Cabrera, Nicholas S. Fitz & Peter B. Reiner (2015). Empirical Support for the Moral Salience of the Therapy-Enhancement Distinction in the Debate Over Cognitive, Affective and Social Enhancement. Neuroethics 8 (3):243-256.
    The ambiguity regarding whether a given intervention is perceived as enhancement or as therapy might contribute to the angst that the public expresses with respect to endorsement of enhancement. We set out to develop empirical data that explored this. We used Amazon Mechanical Turk to recruit participants from Canada and the United States. Each individual was randomly assigned to read one vignette describing the use of a pill to enhance one of 12 cognitive, affective or social domains. The (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12. Adele M. Hayes & Carly Yasinski (2015). Pattern Destabilization and Emotional Processing in Cognitive Therapy for Personality Disorders. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13.  27
    Peter E. Langdon, Glynis H. Murphy, Lee Shepstone, Edward C. F. Wilson, David Fowler, David Heavens, Aida Malovic, Alexandra Russell, Alice Rose & Louise Mullineaux, The People with Asperger Syndrome and Anxiety Disorders Trial: A Pilot Multi-Centre Single Blind Randomised Trial of Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy.
    Background: There is a growing interest in using cognitive behavioural therapy with people who have Asperger Syndrome and comorbid mental health problems. Aims: To examine whether modified group CBT for clinically significant anxiety in an AS population is feasible and likely to be efficacious. Method: Using a randomised assessor-blind trial, 52 individuals with AS were randomised into a treatment arm or a waiting-list control arm. After 24 weeks, those in the waiting-list control arm received treatment, while those initially (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  28
    Garson Leder (forthcoming). Know Thyself? Questioning the Theoretical Foundations of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-20.
    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy has become the dominant form of psychotherapy in North America. The CBT model is theoretically based on the idea that all external and internal stimuli are filtered through meaning-making, consciously accessible cognitive schemas. The goal of CBT is to identify dysfunctional or maladaptive thoughts and beliefs, and replace them with more adaptive cognitive interpretations. While CBT is clearly effective as a treatment, there is good reason to be skeptical that its efficacy is due (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Thomas Cook, Adequate Understanding of Inadequate Ideas: Power and Paradox in Spinoza's Cognitive Therapy.
    Spinoza shared with his contemporaries the conviction that the passions are, on the whole, unruly and destructive. A life of virtue requires that the passions be controlled, if not entirely vanquished, and the preferred means of imposing this control over the passions is via the power of reason. But there was little agreement in the seventeenth century about just what gives reason its strength and how its power can be brought to bear upon the wayward passions.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  11
    William J. Lyddon (forthcoming). Information-Processing and Constructivist Models of Cognitive Therapy: A Philosophical Divergence. Journal of Mind and Behavior.
  17.  15
    William Irwin & Gregory Bassham (2003). Depression, Informal Fallacies, and Cognitive Therapy. Inquiry 21 (3):15-21.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  5
    Christopher Megone (2010). Thomas Aquinas and Cognitive Therapy. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (4):373-376.
  19.  2
    Rodrigo Becerra (2004). “Atmosphere”, a Precursor of “Cognitive Schemas”: Tracing Tacit Phenomenological Influences on Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 4 (1):1-13.
    Whilst individuals deal with divergent sorts of stimuli from the environment, they also tend to display some regularity in the way they respond to related patterns. These consistent responses can be conceptualised as cognitive schemas. A paramount component of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) is the notion of cognitive schemas as they are a favoured point of therapeutic intervention. CBT as articulated by Beck in the 1960s owes intellectual acknowledgment to Merleau-Ponty and Heidegger and their notions of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20. Jack D. Edinger & Colleen E. Carney (2008). Overcoming Insomnia: A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Approach, Therapist Guide. Oxford University Press Usa.
    It is estimated that one in ten U.S. adults suffers from chronic insomnia. If left untreated, chronic insomnia reduces quality of life and increases risk for psychiatric and medical disease, especially depression and anxiety. There are two forms of insomnia: secondary insomnia, in which it is comorbid with another condition such as psychiatric disorders, chronic pain conditions, or cardiopulmonary disorders, and primary insomnia, which does not coexist with any other disorder. This treatment program uses cognitive-behavioral therapy methods to (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Debra A. Hope, Richard G. Heimberg & Cynthia L. Turk (2010). Managing Social Anxiety: A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Approach Therapist Guide. Oxford University Press Usa.
    This revised workbook is designed for patients' use as they work, either with a qualified mental health professional or on their own, to manage social anxiety. Based on the principles of cognitive-behavioral therapy, the treatment program described is evidence-based and proven effective. Complete with user-friendly forms and worksheets, as well as relatable case examples and chapter review questions, this workbook contains all the tools necessary to help patients manage their anxiety and improve their quality of life.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  74
    Eugen Fischer (2004). A Cognitive Self-Therapy : Pi 138-97. In Erich Ammereller & Eugen Fisher (eds.), Wittgenstein at Work: Method in the Philosophical Investigations. Routledge 86--126.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Christine Tappolet & Bruce Maxwell (2012). Rethinking Cognitive Mediation: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and the Perceptual Theory of Emotion. Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology 19 (1):1-12.
    Empirical assessments of Cognitive Behavioral Theory and theoretical considerations raise questions about the fundamental theoretical tenet that psychological disturbances are mediated by consciously accessible cognitive structures. This paper considers this situation in light of emotion theory in philosophy. We argue that the “perceptual theory” of emotions, which underlines the parallels between emotions and sensory perceptions, suggests a conception of cognitive mediation that can accommodate the observed empirical anomalies and one that is consistent with the dual-processing models dominant (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  15
    David A. Clark & Aaron T. Beck (2010). Cognitive Theory and Therapy of Anxiety and Depression: Convergence with Neurobiological Findings. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (9):418-424.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  25.  9
    Niklas Bornhauser & Rudi Wagner (2012). Problems and perspectives concerning the human conjectural conceptions in cognitive - behavioral therapy. Cinta de Moebio 44 (44):106-121.
    Nowadays psychology as a scientific discourse and a positive practice finds itself in an epistemologically critical situation. The analysis of the actual state of the academic discussion in cognitive-behavioural psychology, the most representative and widespread theoretical-practical trend in European nations, reveals that it frequently is misunderstood as a exclusively technical proceeding, an amount of deficiently articulated operatory interventions, alienated from its underlying anthropological assumptions. This paper proposes to exam how far the gap between theoretical reflection and effective practice, a (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Cristina Giner-Bartolomé, Ana B. Fagundo, Isabel Sánchez, Susana Jiménez-Murcia, Juan J. Santamaría, Robert Ladouceur, José M. Menchón & Fernando Fernández-Aranda (2015). Can an Intervention Based on a Serious Videogame Prior to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Be Helpful in Bulimia Nervosa? A Clinical Case Study. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27. Stephanie Mehl, Dirk Werner & Tania M. Lincoln (2015). Does Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Psychosis Show a Sustainable Effect on Delusions? A Meta-Analysis. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28. Neil Thomas (2015). What's Really Wrong with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Psychosis? Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  1
    Keith R. Laws (2016). Commentary: Does Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Psychosis Show a Sustainable Effect on Delusions? A Meta-Analysis. Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  30
    William Ferraiolo (2011). Donald Robertson, The Philosophy of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT): Stoic Philosophy as Rational and Cognitive Psychotherapy. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 45 (2):239-243.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  7
    Zindel V. Segal & Michael Gemar (1997). Changes in Cognitive Organisation for Negative Self-Referent Material Following Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Depression: A Primed Stroop Study. Cognition and Emotion 11 (5-6):501-516.
  32.  15
    Linda L. Spier (2008). Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy. Semiotics:700-707.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  3
    Angelica Staniloiu & Ari E. Zaretsky (2015). Deconstructing the Process of Change in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: An Alternative Approach Focusing on the Episodic Retrieval Mode. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  1
    Tharina Guse (2010). Owen's Intentionality Model in Integrative Psychotherapy Talk, Action, Belief: How the Intentionality Model Combines Attachment-Oriented Psychodynamic Therapy and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Ian Rory Owen: Book Review. [REVIEW] Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 10 (1):1-3.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Michèle D. Birtel & Richard J. Crisp (2015). Psychotherapy and Social Change: Utilizing Principles of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Help Develop New Prejudice-Reduction Interventions. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. C. R. Blease (2015). Talking More About Talking Cures: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Informed Consent. Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (9):750-755.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Edward Erwin (2007). Cognitive-Behavioral: Cognitive-Behavior Therapy. In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. OUP Usa
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Dawn L. Merrett, Isabelle Peretz & Sarah J. Wilson (2014). Neurobiological, Cognitive, and Emotional Mechanisms in Melodic Intonation Therapy. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Emmanuelle Peters, Tessa Crombie, Deborah Agbedjro, Louise C. Johns, Daniel Stahl, Kathryn Greenwood, Nadine Keen, Juliana Onwumere, Elaine Hunter, Laura Smith & Elizabeth Kuipers (2015). The Long-Term Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Psychosis Within a Routine Psychological Therapies Service. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. B. O. Rothbaum & E. B. Foa (1996). Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. In van der Kolk BA, McFarlane AC, Weisaeth L (Eds): Traumatic Stress: The Effects of Overwhelming Experience on Mind. Body and Society. New York, Guilford Press 491.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. David Smailes, Ben Alderson-Day, Charles Fernyhough, Simon McCarthy-Jones & Guy Dodgson (2015). Tailoring Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Subtypes of Voice-Hearing. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  3
    Edward G. Hughes (2010). Art Therapy as a Healing Tool for Sub-Fertile Women. Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (1):27-36.
    Although fertility is fundamental to spiritual health, it is often taken for granted. When a desired pregnancy fails to occur, stress and grief frequently follow. Visual expression of feelings through “art therapy” has proved a powerful healing tool for women brave enough to give it a try at the McMaster University Fertility Clinic. The objective and subjective findings of this ongoing project suggest that through simple visual self-expression, stress, anxiety and hopelessness may be reduced. This form of art (...) also provides a joyful social experience of sharing with other women, who are dealing with these issues. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  19
    Ginger A. Hoffman (2013). Treating Yourself as an Object: Self-Objectification and the Ethical Dimensions of Antidepressant Use. Neuroethics 6 (1):165-178.
    In this paper, I offer one moral reason to eschew antidepressant medication in favor of cognitive therapy, all other things being equal: taking antidepressants can be a form of self-objectification. This means that, by taking antidepressants, one treats oneself, in some sense and some cases, like a mere object. I contend that, morally, this amounts to a specific form of devaluing oneself. I argue this as follows. First, I offer a detailed definition of “objectification” and argue for the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  17
    Sarah C. Byers (2003). Augustine and the Cognitive Cause of Stoic Preliminary Passions ( Propatheiai ). Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (4):433-448.
  45.  81
    Rom Harré (2008). Grammatical Therapy and the Third Wittgenstein. Metaphilosophy 39 (4-5):484-491.
    Abstract: The argument for interpreting Wittgenstein's project as primarily therapeutic can be extended from the domain of intellectual pathologies that form the core of the Philosophical Investigations to the topics in On Certainty , carrying further Hutchinson's recent argument for the priority of therapy in Wittgenstein's project. In this article I discuss whether the line Hutchinson takes is extendable to the work of the Third Wittgenstein. For example, how does Wittgenstein's discussion of Moore's "refutation of idealism" in On Certainty (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  46. Reginald D. V. Nixon, Richard A. Bryant & Michelle L. Moulds (2006). Cognitive-Behavioural Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Following Awareness Under Anaesthesia: A Case Study. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy 34 (1):113-118.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  3
    Clémence Isaac & Dominique Januel (2016). Neural Correlates of Cognitive Improvements Following Cognitive Remediation in Schizophrenia: A Systematic Review of Randomized Trials. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  27
    Richard A. Shweder (2012). Anthropology's Disenchantment With the Cognitive Revolution1. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (3):354-361.
    Beller, Bender, and Medin should be congratulated for their generous attempt at expressive academic therapy for troubled interdisciplinary relationships. In this essay, I suggest that a negative answer to the central question (“Should anthropology be part of cognitive science?”) is not necessarily distressing, that in retrospect the breakup seems fairly predictable, and that disenchantment with the cognitive revolution is nothing new.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49. Robyn J. Cohen & John E. Calamari (2004). Thought-Focused Attention and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms: An Evaluation of Cognitive Self-Consciousness in a Nonclinical Sample. Cognitive Therapy and Research 28 (4):457-471.
  50. J. Bossaer, J. A. Gray, S. E. Miller, V. C. Gaddipati, R. E. Enck & G. G. Enck (2013). The Use (and Misuse) of 'Cognitive Enhancers' by Students at an Academic Health Sciences Center. Academic Medicine (7):967-971.
    Purpose Prescription stimulant use as “cognitive enhancers” has been described among undergraduate college students. However, the use of prescription stimulants among future health care professionals is not well characterized. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of prescription stimulant misuse among students at an academic health sciences center. -/- Method Electronic surveys were e-mailed to 621 medical, pharmacy, and respiratory therapy students at East Tennessee State University for four consecutive weeks in fall 2011. Completing the survey was (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000