Search results for 'Cognitive Therapy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Donald Robertson (2010). The Philosophy of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (Cbt): Stoic Philosophy as Rational and Cognitive Psychotherapy. Karnac.score: 81.0
    Pt. I. Philosophy and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) -- Ch. 1. The "philosophical origins" of CBT -- Ch. 2. The beginning of modern cognitive therapy -- Ch. 3. A brief history of philosophical therapy -- Ch. 4. Stoic philosophy and psychology -- Ch. 5. Rational emotion in stoicism and CBT -- Ch. 6 Stoicism and Ellis's rational therapy (REBT) -- Pt. II. The stoic armamentarium -- Ch. 7. Contemplation of the ideal stage -- Ch. 8. (...)
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  2. Giuseppe Butera (2011). Thomas Aquinas and Cognitive Therapy: An Exploration of the Promise of the Thomistic Psychology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (4):347-366.score: 60.0
    In his classic introduction to the subject, Cognitive Therapy and the Emotional Disorders, Aaron Beck observes that “the philosophical underpinnings” of cognitive therapy’s (CT) approach to the emotional disorders “go back thousands of years, certainly to the time of the Stoics, who considered man’s conceptions (or misconceptions) of events rather than the events themselves as the key to his emotional upsets” (Beck 1976, 3). But beyond acknowledging that the stoics anticipated the central insight of CT, Beck (...)
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  3. Richard Gilpin (2008). The Use of Theravada Buddhist Practices and Perspectives in Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy. Contemporary Buddhism 9 (2):227-251.score: 60.0
    This study explores and assesses the nature and practice of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) from the perspective of Therav?da Buddhism. It is particularly concerned with how both models of training understand and apply ?mindfulness?. The approach here is, firstly, to examine how the Therav?da understands and employs mindfulness and, secondly, to explore, and more accurately contextualize, the work of MBCT. The evaluation of MBCT in terms of the Therav?da suggests the former has both a strong affinity with, as (...)
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  4. Melanie Fennell & Zindel Segal (2011). Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy: Culture Clash or Creative Fusion? Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):125--142.score: 60.0
    Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy creates an unlikely partnership, between the ancient tradition of mindfulness meditation rooted in Buddhist thought, and the much more recent and essentially western tradition of cognitive and clinical science. This article investigates points of congruence and difference between the two traditions and concludes that, despite first appearances, this is a fruitful partnership which may well endure.
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  5. Ahmed A. Moustafa (2013). Increased Hippocampal Volume and Gene Expression Following Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in PTSD. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 60.0
  6. Rodrigo Becerra (2004). “Atmosphere”, a Precursor of “Cognitive Schemas”: Tracing Tacit Phenomenological Influences on Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 4 (1).score: 48.0
    Whilst individuals deal with divergent sorts of stimuli from the environment, they also tend to display some regularity in the way they respond to related patterns. These consistent responses can be conceptualised as cognitive schemas. A paramount component of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) is the notion of cognitive schemas as they are a favoured point of therapeutic intervention. CBT as articulated by Beck in the 1960s owes intellectual acknowledgment to Merleau-Ponty and Heidegger and their notions of (...)
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  7. Thomas Cook, Adequate Understanding of Inadequate Ideas: Power and Paradox in Spinoza's Cognitive Therapy.score: 45.0
    Spinoza shared with his contemporaries the conviction that the passions are, on the whole, unruly and destructive. A life of virtue requires that the passions be controlled, if not entirely vanquished, and the preferred means of imposing this control over the passions is via the power of reason. But there was little agreement in the seventeenth century about just what gives reason its strength and how its power can be brought to bear upon the wayward passions.
     
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  8. Ginger A. Hoffman (2013). Treating Yourself as an Object: Self-Objectification and the Ethical Dimensions of Antidepressant Use. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 6 (1):165-178.score: 45.0
    In this paper, I offer one moral reason to eschew antidepressant medication in favor of cognitive therapy, all other things being equal: taking antidepressants can be a form of self-objectification. This means that, by taking antidepressants, one treats oneself, in some sense and some cases, like a mere object. I contend that, morally, this amounts to a specific form of devaluing oneself. I argue this as follows. First, I offer a detailed definition of “objectification” and argue for the (...)
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  9. Donald P. Moss (1992). Cognitive Therapy, Phenomenology, and the Struggle for Meaning. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 23 (1):87-102.score: 45.0
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  10. William Irwin & Gregory Bassham (2003). Depression, Informal Fallacies, and Cognitive Therapy. Inquiry 21 (3):15-21.score: 45.0
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  11. William J. Lyddon (forthcoming). Information-Processing and Constructivist Models of Cognitive Therapy: A Philosophical Divergence. Journal of Mind and Behavior.score: 45.0
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  12. Marieke Karlijn van Vugt, Peter Hitchcock, Ben Shahar & Willoughby Britton (2012). The Effects of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy on Affective Memory Recall Dynamics in Depression: A Mechanistic Model of Rumination. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 45.0
    Objectives: Converging research suggests that mindfulness training exerts its therapeutic effects on depression by reducing rumination. Theoretically, rumination is a multifaceted construct that aggregates multiple neurocognitive aspects of depression, including poor executive control, negative and overgeneral memory bias, and persistence or stickiness of negative mind states. Current measures of rumination, most often self-reports, do not capture these different aspects of ruminative tendencies, and therefore are limited in providing detailed information about the mechanisms of mindfulness. Methods: We developed new insights into (...)
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  13. Christopher Megone (2010). Thomas Aquinas and Cognitive Therapy. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (4):373-376.score: 45.0
  14. Eugen Fischer (2004). A Cognitive Self-Therapy : Pi 138-97. In Erich Ammereller & Eugen Fisher (eds.), Wittgenstein at Work: Method in the Philosophical Investigations. Routledge. 86--126.score: 42.0
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  15. Edward G. Hughes (2010). Art Therapy as a Healing Tool for Sub-Fertile Women. Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (1):27-36.score: 42.0
    Although fertility is fundamental to spiritual health, it is often taken for granted. When a desired pregnancy fails to occur, stress and grief frequently follow. Visual expression of feelings through “art therapy” has proved a powerful healing tool for women brave enough to give it a try at the McMaster University Fertility Clinic. The objective and subjective findings of this ongoing project suggest that through simple visual self-expression, stress, anxiety and hopelessness may be reduced. This form of art (...) also provides a joyful social experience of sharing with other women, who are dealing with these issues. (shrink)
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  16. Christine Tappolet & Bruce Maxwell (2012). Rethinking Cognitive Mediation: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and the Perceptual Theory of Emotion. Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology 19 (1):1-12.score: 39.0
    Empirical assessments of Cognitive Behavioral Theory and theoretical considerations raise questions about the fundamental theoretical tenet that psychological disturbances are mediated by consciously accessible cognitive structures. This paper considers this situation in light of emotion theory in philosophy. We argue that the “perceptual theory” of emotions, which underlines the parallels between emotions and sensory perceptions, suggests a conception of cognitive mediation that can accommodate the observed empirical anomalies and one that is consistent with the dual-processing models dominant (...)
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  17. Niklas Bornhauser & Rudi Wagner (2012). Problems and perspectives concerning the human conjectural conceptions in cognitive - behavioral therapy. Cinta de Moebio 44 (44):106-121.score: 39.0
    Nowadays psychology as a scientific discourse and a positive practice finds itself in an epistemologically critical situation. The analysis of the actual state of the academic discussion in cognitive-behavioural psychology, the most representative and widespread theoretical-practical trend in European nations, reveals that it frequently is misunderstood as a exclusively technical proceeding, an amount of deficiently articulated operatory interventions, alienated from its underlying anthropological assumptions. This paper proposes to exam how far the gap between theoretical reflection and effective practice, a (...)
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  18. David A. Clark & Aaron T. Beck (2010). Cognitive Theory and Therapy of Anxiety and Depression: Convergence with Neurobiological Findings. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (9):418-424.score: 39.0
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  19. Zindel V. Segal & Michael Gemar (1997). Changes in Cognitive Organisation for Negative Self-Referent Material Following Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Depression: A Primed Stroop Study. Cognition and Emotion 11 (5-6):501-516.score: 37.0
  20. Rom Harré (2008). Grammatical Therapy and the Third Wittgenstein. Metaphilosophy 39 (4-5):484-491.score: 36.0
    Abstract: The argument for interpreting Wittgenstein's project as primarily therapeutic can be extended from the domain of intellectual pathologies that form the core of the Philosophical Investigations to the topics in On Certainty , carrying further Hutchinson's recent argument for the priority of therapy in Wittgenstein's project. In this article I discuss whether the line Hutchinson takes is extendable to the work of the Third Wittgenstein. For example, how does Wittgenstein's discussion of Moore's "refutation of idealism" in On Certainty (...)
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  21. William Ferraiolo (2011). Donald Robertson, The Philosophy of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT): Stoic Philosophy as Rational and Cognitive Psychotherapy. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 45 (2):239-243.score: 36.0
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  22. Rita Pezzati, Valentina Molteni, Marco Bani, Carmen Settanta, Maria Grazia Di Maggio, Ivan Villa, Barbara Poletti & Rita B. Ardito (2014). Can Doll Therapy Preserve or Promote Attachment in People with Cognitive, Behavioral, and Emotional Problems? A Pilot Study in Institutionalized Patients with Dementia. Frontiers in Psychology 5.score: 36.0
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  23. Linda L. Spier (forthcoming). Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy. Semiotics:700-707.score: 36.0
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  24. Philippe De Timary, Susann Heenen-Wolff & Pierre Philippot (2011). The Question of “Representation” in the Psychoanalytical and Cognitive-Behavioral Approaches. Some Theoretical Aspects and Therapy Considerations. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 36.0
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  25. Edward Erwin (2007). Cognitive-Behavioral: Cognitive-Behavior Therapy. In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oup Usa.score: 36.0
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  26. Tharina Guse (2010). Owen's Intentionality Model in Integrative Psychotherapy Talk, Action, Belief: How the Intentionality Model Combines Attachment-Oriented Psychodynamic Therapy and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Ian Rory Owen: Book Review. [REVIEW] Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 10 (1):1-3.score: 36.0
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  27. Michael McEachrane (2009). Capturing Emotional Thoughts: The Philosophy of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy. In Ylva Gustafsson, Camilla Kronqvist & Michael McEachrane (eds.), Emotions and Understanding: Wittgensteinian Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 36.0
  28. Reginald D. V. Nixon, Richard A. Bryant & Michelle L. Moulds (2006). Cognitive-Behavioural Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Following Awareness Under Anaesthesia: A Case Study. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy 34 (1):113-118.score: 36.0
     
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  29. B. O. Rothbaum & E. B. Foa (1996). Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. In van der Kolk BA, McFarlane AC, Weisaeth L (Eds): Traumatic Stress: The Effects of Overwhelming Experience on Mind. Body and Society. New York, Guilford Press 491.score: 36.0
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  30. Michael Osterheider Steffen Landgraf (2013). “To See or Not to See: That is the Question.” The “Protection-Against-Schizophrenia” (PaSZ) Model: Evidence From Congenital Blindness and Visuo-Cognitive Aberrations. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 36.0
    The causes of schizophrenia are still unknown. For the last one hundred years, though, both “absent” and “perfect” vision have been associated with a lower risk for schizophrenia. Hence, vision itself and aberrations in visual functioning may be fundamental to the development and etiological explanations of the disorder. In this paper, we present the “Protection-Against-Schizophrenia” (PaSZ) model, which grades the risk for developing schizophrenia as a function of an individual’s visual capacity. We review two vision perspectives: (1) “Absent” vision or (...)
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  31. Jennifer Mundale (2004). That Way Madness Lies: At the Intersection of Philosophy and Clinical Psychology. Metaphilosophy 35 (5):661-674.score: 30.0
  32. Richard A. Shweder (2012). Anthropology's Disenchantment With the Cognitive Revolution1. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (3):354-361.score: 30.0
    Beller, Bender, and Medin should be congratulated for their generous attempt at expressive academic therapy for troubled interdisciplinary relationships. In this essay, I suggest that a negative answer to the central question (“Should anthropology be part of cognitive science?”) is not necessarily distressing, that in retrospect the breakup seems fairly predictable, and that disenchantment with the cognitive revolution is nothing new.
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  33. Cema Cardona Gomes, Thiago Osório Comis & Rosa Maria Martins de Almeida (2010). Transtorno obsessivo-compulsivo nas diferentes faixas etárias. Aletheia 33:138-150.score: 30.0
    O transtorno obsessivo-compulsivo submete o portador a um ciclo de pensamentos e comportamentos em busca de uma satisfação momentânea. Os sintomas são semelhantes, independente da faixa etária, e as repercussões se dão nos principais setores da vida dos acometidos por transtorno. Por isso, o tratame..
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  34. Robyn J. Cohen & John E. Calamari (2004). Thought-Focused Attention and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms: An Evaluation of Cognitive Self-Consciousness in a Nonclinical Sample. Cognitive Therapy and Research 28 (4):457-471.score: 30.0
     
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  35. J. Bossaer, J. A. Gray, S. E. Miller, V. C. Gaddipati, R. E. Enck & G. G. Enck (2013). The Use (and Misuse) of 'Cognitive Enhancers' by Students at an Academic Health Sciences Center. Academic Medicine (7):967-971.score: 27.0
    Purpose Prescription stimulant use as “cognitive enhancers” has been described among undergraduate college students. However, the use of prescription stimulants among future health care professionals is not well characterized. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of prescription stimulant misuse among students at an academic health sciences center. -/- Method Electronic surveys were e-mailed to 621 medical, pharmacy, and respiratory therapy students at East Tennessee State University for four consecutive weeks in fall 2011. Completing the survey was (...)
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  36. Eugen Fischer (2011). How to Practise Philosophy as Therapy: Philosophical Therapy and Therapeutic Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 42 (1-2):49-82.score: 27.0
    Abstract: The notion that philosophy can be practised as a kind of therapy has become a focus of debate. This article explores how philosophy can be practised literally as a kind of therapy, in two very different ways: as philosophical therapy that addresses “real-life problems” (e.g., Sextus Empiricus) and as therapeutic philosophy that meets a need for therapy which arises in and from philosophical reflection (e.g., Wittgenstein). With the help of concepts adapted from cognitive and (...)
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  37. Eugen Fischer (2011). Diseases of the Understanding and the Need for Philosophical Therapy. Philosophical Investigations 34 (1):22-54.score: 27.0
    The paper develops and addresses a major challenge for therapeutic conceptions of philosophy of the sort increasingly attributed to Wittgenstein. To be substantive and relevant, such conceptions have to identify “diseases of the understanding” from which philosophers suffer, and to explain why these “diseases” need to be cured in order to resolve or overcome important philosophical problems. The paper addresses this challenge in three steps: With the help of findings and concepts from cognitive linguistics and cognitive psychology, it (...)
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  38. James Giles (2002). Electroconvulsive Therapy and the Fear of Deviance. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 32 (1):61–87.score: 27.0
    After reaching the verge of obsolescence, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is once again on the increase. There remains, however, no sound theoretical basis for its use. By 1948 at least 50 different theories had been proposed to account for the workings of ECT. Today there are numerous more. Further, there is no good evidence for its therapeutic effectiveness. Although some studies show what are claimed to be positive results, others show significant amount of relapse, even with severe depression (the disorder (...)
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  39. S. G. Simpson, E. Morrow, M. Vreeswijk & C. Reid (2009). Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Pilot Study. Frontiers in Psychology 1:182-182.score: 27.0
    This paper describes the use of Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders (ST-E-g) in a case-series of eight participants with chronic eating disorders and high levels of co-morbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, experiential and interpersonal strategies, with an emphasis on behavioural change. Specific schema-based strategies focused on bodily felt-sense and body-image, as well as emotional regulation skills. Six attended until end of treatment, two dropped-out at mid-treatment. Eating disorder severity, global schema severity, shame (...)
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  40. Eugen Fischer (2008). Wittgenstein's 'Non-Cognitivism' – Explained and Vindicated. Synthese 162 (1):53 - 84.score: 24.0
    The later Wittgenstein advanced a revolutionary but puzzling conception of how philosophy ought to be practised: Philosophical problems are not to be coped with by establishing substantive claims or devising explanations or theories. Instead, philosophical questions ought to be treated ‘like an illness’. Even though this ‘non-cognitivism’ about philosophy has become a focus of debate, the specifically ‘therapeutic’ aims and ‘non-theoretical’ methods constitutive of it remain ill understood. They are motivated by Wittgenstein’s view that the problems he addresses result from (...)
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  41. Paul Franceschi, Complement to a Theory of the Cognitive Distortions.score: 24.0
    The purpose of this study is to describe a conceptual framework for cognitive distortions, which notably allows to specify more accurately their intrinsic relationships. This conceptual framework aims at inserting itself within the apparatus of cognitive therapy and of critical thinking. The present analysis is based on the following fundamental concepts: the reference class, the duality and the system of taxa. With the help of these three notions, each cognitive distortion can be defined. A distinction is (...)
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  42. C. R. Blease (2013). Electroconvulsive Therapy, the Placebo Effect and Informed Consent. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):166-170.score: 24.0
    Major depressive disorder is not only the most widespread mental disorder in the world, it is a disorder on the rise. In cases of particularly severe forms of depression, when all other treatment options have failed, the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a recommended treatment option for patients. ECT has been in use in psychiatric practice for over 70 years and is now undergoing something of a restricted renaissance following a sharp decline in its use in the 1970s. (...)
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  43. Wing K. Ng, Risa N. Thompson, Stuart A. Yablon & Mark Sherer (2001). Conceptual Dilemmas in Evaluating Individuals with Severely Impaired Consciousness. Brain Injury 15 (7):639-643.score: 24.0
  44. David Fewtrell (1995). Clinical Phenomenology and Cognitive Psychology. Routledge.score: 22.0
    Cognitive therapies are often biased in their assessment of clinical problems by their emphasis on the role of verbally-mediated thought in shaping our emotions, and in stressing the influence of thought upon feeling. Alternatively, a more phenomenological appraisal of psychological dysfunction suggests that emotion and thinking are complementary processes which influence each other. Cognitive psychology developed out of information-processing models, whereas phenomenological psychology is rooted in a philosophical perspective which avoids the assumptions of positivist methodology. But, despite their (...)
     
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  45. Mog Stapleton (2013). Steps to a "Properly Embodied" Cognitive Science. Cognitive Systems Research 22 (June):1-11.score: 21.0
    Cognitive systems research has predominantly been guided by the historical distinction between emotion and cognition, and has focused its efforts on modelling the “cognitive” aspects of behaviour. While this initially meant modelling only the control system of cognitive creatures, with the advent of “embodied” cognitive science this expanded to also modelling the interactions between the control system and the external environment. What did not seem to change with this embodiment revolution, however, was the attitude towards affect (...)
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  46. Uriah Kriegel (2011). Cognitive Phenomenology as the Basis of Unconscious Content. In T. Bayne & M. Montague (eds.), Cognitive Phenomenology. Oxford University Press. 79--102.score: 21.0
    Since the seventies, it has been customary to assume that intentionality is independent of consciousness. Recently, a number of philosophers have rejected this assumption, claiming intentionality is closely tied to consciousness, inasmuch as non- conscious intentionality in some sense depends upon conscious intentionality. Within this alternative framework, the question arises of how to account for unconscious intentionality, and different authors have offered different accounts. In this paper, I compare and contrast four possible accounts of unconscious intentionality, which I call potentialism, (...)
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  47. Carrie Figdor (2011). Semantics and Metaphysics in Informatics: Toward an Ontology of Tasks (a Reply to Lenartowicz Et Al. 2010, Towards an Ontology of Cognitive Control). Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):222-226.score: 21.0
    This article clarifies three principles that should guide the development of any cognitive ontology. First, that an adequate cognitive ontology depends essentially on an adequate task ontology; second, that the goal of developing a cognitive ontology is independent of the goal of finding neural implementations of the processes referred to in the ontology; and third, that cognitive ontologies are neutral regarding the metaphysical relationship between cognitive and neural processes.
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  48. P. Sven Arvidson (2003). A Lexicon of Attention: From Cognitive Science to Phenomenology. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (2):99-132.score: 21.0
    This article tries to create a bridge of understanding between cognitive scientists and phenomenologists who work on attention. In light of a phenomenology of attention and current psychological and neuropsychological literature on attention, I translate and interpret into phenomenological terms 20 key cognitive science concepts as examined in the laboratory and used in leading journals. As a preface to the lexicon, I outline a phenomenology of attention, especially as a dynamic three-part structure, which I have freely amended from (...)
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  49. Mark Collier (2005). Hume and Cognitive Science: The Current Status of the Controversy Over Abstract Ideas. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):197-207.score: 21.0
    In Book I, Part I, Section VII of the Treatise, Hume sets out to settle, once and for all, the early modern controversy over abstract ideas. In order to do so, he tries to accomplish two tasks: (1) he attempts to defend an exemplar-based theory of general language and thought, and (2) he sets out to refute the rival abstraction-based account. This paper examines the successes and failures of these two projects. I argue that Hume manages to articulate a plausible (...)
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