Search results for 'Cognitive grammar' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  7
    Klaas Willems (2011). Meaning and Interpretation: The Semiotic Similarities and Differences Between Cognitive Grammar and European Structural Linguistics. Semiotica 2011 (185):1-50.
    The theoretical and methodological underpinnings of the cognitive paradigm have traditionally been discussed against the background of generative grammar, its immediate predecessor. A significantly less researched yet no less interesting relationship is the one between the cognitive and structuralist paradigm. This article focuses on the in part converging, in part diverging semiotic assumptions underlying European structural linguistics and Cognitive Grammar. A comparison of important concepts of both theories shows that, although Cognitive Grammar arrives (...)
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  2. John R. Taylor (2003). Cognitive Grammar. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Cognitive Grammar offers a radical alternative to mainstream linguistic theories. This book introduces the theory in clear, non-technical language, relates it to current debates about the nature of linguistic knowledge, and applies it to in-depth analyses of a range of topics in semantics, syntax, morphology, and phonology. Study questions and suggestions for further reading accompany each of the main chapters.
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  3. Ronald W. Langacker (2008). Cognitive Grammar: A Basic Introduction. Oxford University Press Usa.
    This book fills a longstanding need for a basic introduction to Cognitive Grammar that is current, authoritative, comprehensive, and approachable. It presents a synthesis that draws together and refines the descriptive and theoretical notions developed in this framework over the course of three decades. In a unified manner, it accommodates both the conceptual and the social-interactive basis of linguistic structure, as well as the need for both functional explanation and explicit structural description. Starting with the fundamentals, essential aspects (...)
     
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  4. Ronald W. Langacker (2008). Cognitive Grammar: A Basic Introduction. Oxford University Press Usa.
    This book fills a long standing need for a basic introduction to Cognitive Grammar that is current, authoritative, comprehensive, and approachable. It presents a synthesis that draws together and refines the descriptive and theoretical notions developed in this framework over the course of three decades. In a unified manner, it accommodates both the conceptual and the social-interactive basis of linguistic structure, as well as the need for both functional explanation and explicit structural description. Starting with the fundamentals, essential (...)
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  5.  4
    Mike Borkent (2015). Chloe Harrison, Louise Nuttall, Peter Stockwell and Wenjuan Yuan . Cognitive Grammar in Literature. Cognitive Linguistics 26 (3):571-582.
    Journal Name: Cognitive Linguistics Issue: Ahead of print.
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  6.  1
    Kasper I. Kok & Alan Cienki (2016). Cognitive Grammar and Gesture: Points of Convergence, Advances and Challenges. Cognitive Linguistics 27 (1):67-100.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Cognitive Linguistics Jahrgang: 27 Heft: 1 Seiten: 67-100.
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  7. Agata Kochańska (2015). Cognitive Grammar, Speech Acts, and Interpersonal Dynamics: A Study of Two Directive Constructions in Polish. Cognitive Linguistics 26 (1):61-94.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Cognitive Linguistics Jahrgang: 26 Heft: 1 Seiten: 61-94.
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  8.  6
    Ronald W. Langacker (1986). An Introduction to Cognitive Grammar. Cognitive Science 10 (1):1-40.
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  9. Jennifer Culbertson, Paul Smolensky & Colin Wilson (2013). Cognitive Biases, Linguistic Universals, and Constraint‐Based Grammar Learning. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (3):392-424.
    According to classical arguments, language learning is both facilitated and constrained by cognitive biases. These biases are reflected in linguistic typology—the distribution of linguistic patterns across the world's languages—and can be probed with artificial grammar experiments on child and adult learners. Beginning with a widely successful approach to typology (Optimality Theory), and adapting techniques from computational approaches to statistical learning, we develop a Bayesian model of cognitive biases and show that it accounts for the detailed (...)
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  10. A. B. Markman & E. Dietrich (2000). Box 1. Cognitive Grammar. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (12):470-475.
     
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  11.  6
    Jean Petitot (1995). Morphodynamics and Attractor Syntax: Constituency in Visual Perception and Cognitive Grammar. In Tim van Gelder & Robert Port (eds.), Mind as Motion: Explorations in the Dynamics of Cognition. MIT Press 227--83.
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  12.  13
    Frank Brisardi (2013). An Account of English Tense and Aspect in Cognitive Grammar. In Kasia M. Jaszczolt & Louis de Saussure (eds.), Time: Language, Cognition & Reality. OUP Oxford 1--210.
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  13.  18
    Bruce Bridgeman (2003). Grammar Originates in Action Planning, Not in Cognitive and Sensorimotor Visual Systems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):287-287.
    While the PREDICATE(x) structure requires close coordination of subject and predicate, both represented in consciousness, the cognitive (ventral), and sensorimotor (dorsal) pathways operate in parallel. Sensorimotor information is unconscious and can contradict cognitive spatial information. A more likely origin of linguistic grammar lies in the mammalian action planning process. Neurological machinery evolved for planning of action sequences becomes applied to planning communicatory sequences.
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  14.  4
    Remi van Trijp (2015). Cognitive Vs. Generative Construction Grammar: The Case of Coercion and Argument Structure. Cognitive Linguistics 26 (4):613-632.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Cognitive Linguistics Jahrgang: 26 Heft: 4 Seiten: 613-632.
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  15.  3
    D. Jurafski (forthcoming). {A Cognitive Model of Sentence Comprehension: The Construction Grammar Approach}. {Cognitive Science}.
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  16.  34
    Harald Maurer (2009). Paul Smolensky, Géraldine Legendre: The Harmonic Mind. From Neural Computation to Optimality-Theoretic Grammar. Vol. 1: Cognitive Architecture. Vol. 2: Linguistic and Philosophical Implications. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 40 (1):141-147.
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  17.  12
    William Ramsey (2009). The Harmonic Mind: From Neural Computation to Optimality-Theoretic Grammar-Volume 1: Cognitive Architecture and Volume 2: Linguistic and Philosophical Implications. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 50 (3):172-184.
  18. A. Herskovits (1996). Ronald W. Langacker, Concept, Image, and Symbol: The Cognitive Basis of Grammar. Minds and Machines 6:242-248.
     
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  19.  40
    Peer F. Bundgaard (2004). The Ideal Scaffolding of Language: Husser's Fourth Logical Investigation in the Light of Cognitive Linguistics. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (1):49-80.
    One of the central issues in linguistics is whether or not language should be considered a self-contained, autonomous formal system, essentially reducible to the syntactic algorithms of meaning construction (as Chomskyan grammar would have it), or a holistic-functional system serving the means of expressing pre-organized intentional contents and thus accessible with respect to features and structures pertaining to other cognitive subsystems or to human experience as such (as Cognitive Linguistics would have it). The latter claim depends critically (...)
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  20.  48
    Vyvyan Evans (2009). How Words Mean: Lexical Concepts, Cognitive Models, and Meaning Construction. Oxford University Press.
    These are central to the accounts of lexical representation and meaning construction developed, giving rise to the Theory of Lexical Concepts and Cognitive ...
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  21.  10
    Dylan Glynn & Kerstin Fischer (eds.) (2010). Quantitative Methods in Cognitive Semantics: Corpus-Driven Approaches. De Gruyter Mouton.
    Corpus-driven Cognitive Semantics Introduction to the field Dylan Glynn Is quantitative empirical research possible for the study of semantics?1 More ...
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  22.  55
    H. Cuyckens, René Dirven & John R. Taylor (eds.) (2003). Cognitive Approaches to Lexical Semantics. Mouton De Gruyter.
    "This book provides a representative survey of early and more recent concerns in cognitively inspired lexical semantics.
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  23. Małgorzata Fabiszak (ed.) (2007). Language and Meaning: Cognitive and Functional Perspectives. P. Lang.
  24.  38
    David Reitter, Frank Keller & Johanna D. Moore (2011). A Computational Cognitive Model of Syntactic Priming. Cognitive Science 35 (4):587-637.
    The psycholinguistic literature has identified two syntactic adaptation effects in language production: rapidly decaying short-term priming and long-lasting adaptation. To explain both effects, we present an ACT-R model of syntactic priming based on a wide-coverage, lexicalized syntactic theory that explains priming as facilitation of lexical access. In this model, two well-established ACT-R mechanisms, base-level learning and spreading activation, account for long-term adaptation and short-term priming, respectively. Our model simulates incremental language production and in a series of modeling studies, we show (...)
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  25.  16
    Doug Jones (2010). Human Kinship, From Conceptual Structure to Grammar. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (5):367.
    Research in anthropology has shown that kin terminologies have a complex combinatorial structure and vary systematically across cultures. This article argues that universals and variation in kin terminology result from the interaction of (1) an innate conceptual structure of kinship, homologous with conceptual structure in other domains, and (2) principles of optimal, communication active in language in general. Kin terms from two languages, English and Seneca, show how terminologies that look very different on the surface may result from variation in (...)
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  26.  22
    Richard J. Tunney & David R. Shanks (2003). Does Opposition Logic Provide Evidence for Conscious and Unconscious Processes in Artificial Grammar Learning? Consciousness and Cognition 12 (2):201-218.
    The question of whether studies of human learning provide evidence for distinct conscious and unconscious influences remains as controversial today as ever. Much of this controversy arises from the use of the logic of dissociation. The controversy has prompted the use of an alternative approach that places conscious and unconscious influences on memory retrieval in opposition. Here we ask whether evidence acquired via the logic of opposition requires a dual-process account or whether it can be accommodated within a single similarity-based (...)
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  27. Xabier Arrazola, Kepa Korta, Francis Jeffry Pelletier & International Colloquium on Cognitive Science (1998). Discourse, Interaction and Communication Proceedings of the Fourth International Colloquium on Cognitive Science.
     
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  28. Zoltán Dienes & Josef Perner (1999). A Theory of Implicit and Explicit Knowledge. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):735-808.
    The implicit-explicit distinction is applied to knowledge representations. Knowledge is taken to be an attitude towards a proposition which is true. The proposition itself predicates a property to some entity. A number of ways in which knowledge can be implicit or explicit emerge. If a higher aspect is known explicitly then each lower one must also be known explicitly. This partial hierarchy reduces the number of ways in which knowledge can be explicit. In the most important type of implicit knowledge, (...)
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  29.  39
    John M. Mikhail (2011). Elements of Moral Cognition: Rawls' Linguistic Analogy and the Cognitive Science of Moral and Legal Judgment. Cambridge University Press.
    Is the science of moral cognition usefully modeled on aspects of Universal Grammar? Are human beings born with an innate "moral grammar" that causes them to analyze human action in terms of its moral structure, with just as little awareness as they analyze human speech in terms of its grammatical structure? Questions like these have been at the forefront of moral psychology ever since John Mikhail revived them in his influential work on the linguistic analogy and its implications (...)
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  30. Ray Jackendoff (2002). Foundations of Language: Brain, Meaning, Grammar, Evolution. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Already hailed as a masterpiece, Foundations of Language offers a brilliant overhaul of the last thirty-five years of research in generative linguistics and related fields. "Few books really deserve the cliché 'this should be read by every researcher in the field'," writes Steven Pinker, author of The Language Instinct, "but Ray Jackendoff's Foundations of Language does." Foundations of Language offers a radically new understanding of how language, the brain, and perception intermesh. The book renews the promise of early generative linguistics: (...)
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  31.  14
    James Rogers & Geoffrey K. Pullum (2011). Aural Pattern Recognition Experiments and the Subregular Hierarchy. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 20 (3):329-342.
    We explore the formal foundations of recent studies comparing aural pattern recognition capabilities of populations of human and non-human animals. To date, these experiments have focused on the boundary between the Regular and Context-Free stringsets. We argue that experiments directed at distinguishing capabilities with respect to the Subregular Hierarchy, which subdivides the class of Regular stringsets, are likely to provide better evidence about the distinctions between the cognitive mechanisms of humans and those of other species. Moreover, the classes of (...)
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  32.  61
    Ray Jackendoff (2003). Précis of Foundations of Language: Brain, Meaning, Grammar, Evolution,. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):651-665.
    The goal of this study is to reintegrate the theory of generative grammar into the cognitive sciences. Generative grammar was right to focus on the child's acquisition of language as its central problem, leading to the hypothesis of an innate Universal Grammar. However, generative grammar was mistaken in assuming that the syntactic component is the sole course of combinatoriality, and that everything else is “interpretive.” The proper approach is a parallel architecture, in which phonology, syntax, (...)
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  33. Marina Rakova (2003). The Extent of the Literal: Metaphor, Polysemy and the Theories of Concepts. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The Extent of the Literal develops a strikingly new approach to metaphor and polysemy in their relation to the conceptual structure. In a straightforward narrative style, the author argues for a reconsideration of standard assumptions concerning the notion of literal meaning and its relation to conceptual structure. She draws on neurophysiological and psychological experimental data in support of a view in which polysemy belongs to the level of words but not to the level of concepts, and thus challenges some seminal (...)
     
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  34.  91
    Seana Coulson (2001). Semantic Leaps: Frame-Shifting and Conceptual Blending in Meaning Construction. Cambridge University Press.
    Semantic Leaps explores how people combine knowledge from different domains in order to understand and express new ideas. Concentrating on dynamic aspects of on-line meaning construction, Coulson identifies two related sets of processes: frame-shifting and conceptual blending. Frame-shifting is semantic reanalysis in which existing elements in the contextual representation are reorganized into a new frame. Conceptual blending is a set of cognitive operations for combining partial cognitive models. By addressing linguistic phenomena often ignored in traditional meaning research, Coulson (...)
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  35.  31
    Humphrey P. Polanen Van Petel (2006). Universal Grammar as a Theory of Notation. Axiomathes 16 (4):460-485.
    What is common to all languages is notation, so Universal Grammar can be understood as a system of notational types. Given that infants acquire language, it can be assumed to arise from some a priori mental structure. Viewing language as having the two layers of calculus and protocol, we can set aside the communicative habits of speakers. Accordingly, an analysis of notation results in the three types of Identifier, Modifier and Connective. Modifiers are further interpreted as Quantifiers and Qualifiers. (...)
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  36.  20
    John Kadvany (2010). Indistinguishable From Magic: Computation is Cognitive Technology. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 20 (1):119-143.
    This paper explains how mathematical computation can be constructed from weaker recursive patterns typical of natural languages. A thought experiment is used to describe the formalization of computational rules, or arithmetical axioms, using only orally-based natural language capabilities, and motivated by two accomplishments of ancient Indian mathematics and linguistics. One accomplishment is the expression of positional value using versified Sanskrit number words in addition to orthodox inscribed numerals. The second is Pāṇini’s invention, around the fifth century BCE, of a formal (...)
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  37.  57
    Gilles Fauconnier (1994). Mental Spaces: Aspects of Meaning Construction in Natural Language. Cambridge University Press.
    Mental Spaces is the classic introduction to the study of mental spaces and conceptual projection, as revealed through the structure and use of language. It examines in detail the dynamic construction of connected domains as discourse unfolds. The discovery of mental space organization has modified our conception of language and thought: powerful and uniform accounts of superficially disparate phenomena have become available in the areas of reference, presupposition projection, counterfactual and analogical reasoning, metaphor and metonymy, and time and aspect in (...)
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  38.  12
    Pablo Gamallo Otero (2003). Cognitive Characterisation of Basic Grammatical Structures. Pragmatics and Cognition 11 (2):209-239.
    We describe the role of morphosyntactic categories and syntactic dependencies in the process of semantically interpreting composite expressions. Special attention will be paid to the combinatorial properties conveyed by morphosyntactic categories such as nominals and verbs, as well as by syntactic dependencies like subject, direct object, or nominal modification. The semantic characterisation of these grammatical structures is based on cognitive abilities and abstract conceptualisations. This will provide us with theoretical arguments to review and extend some basic assumptions of (...) Grammar and related work. (shrink)
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  39. V. V. Bogdanov (2005). Lekt͡sii Po Lingvisticheskoĭ Semantike. Sankt-Peterburgskiĭ Gos. Universitet.
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  40. Geert Brône (2010). Bedeutungskonstitution in Verbalem Humor: Ein Kognitiv-Linguistischer Und Diskurssemantischer Ansatz. Peter Lang.
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  41.  30
    Dirk Geeraerts (1997). Diachronic Prototype Semantics: A Contribution to Historical Lexicology. Oxford University Press.
    Prototype theory makes a crucial distinction between central and peripheral sense of words. Geeraerts explores the implications of this model for a theory of semantic change, in the first full-scale treatment of the impact of the most recent developments in lexicological theory on the study of meaning change. He identifies structural features of the development of word meanings which follow from a prototype-theoretical model of semantic structure, and incorporates these diachronic prototypicality effects into a theory of meaning (...). (shrink)
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  42. Karol Janicki (1999). Against Essentialism: Toward Language Awareness. Lincom Europa.
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  43. A. A. Kamalova (ed.) (2006). Pragmatika I Semantika Slova I Teksta: Sbornik Nauchnykh Stateĭ. Pomorskiĭ Universitet.
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  44. Duška Klikovac (2004). Metafore U Mišljenju I Jeziku. Čigoja Štampa.
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  45.  17
    Barbara Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk (ed.) (1998). Lexical Semantics Cognition and Philosophy. Łódź University Press.
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  46. P. Pauwels (2000). Put, Set, Lay, and Place: A Cognitve Linguistic Approach to Verbal Meaning. Lincom Europa.
     
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  47.  71
    Nicholas Evans & Stephen C. Levinson (2009). The Myth of Language Universals: Language Diversity and its Importance for Cognitive Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):429-448.
    Talk of linguistic universals has given cognitive scientists the impression that languages are all built to a common pattern. In fact, there are vanishingly few universals of language in the direct sense that all languages exhibit them. Instead, diversity can be found at almost every level of linguistic organization. This fundamentally changes the object of enquiry from a cognitive science perspective. This target article summarizes decades of cross-linguistic work by typologists and descriptive linguists, showing just how few and (...)
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  48.  16
    Margaret Boden (2008). Mind as Machine: A History of Cognitive Science. OUP Oxford.
    The development of cognitive science is one of the most remarkable and fascinating intellectual achievements of the modern era. The quest to understand the mind is as old as recorded human thought; but the progress of modern science has offered new methods and techniques which have revolutionized this enquiry. Oxford University Press now presents a masterful history of cognitive science, told by one of its most eminent practitioners. -/- Cognitive science is the project of understanding the mind (...)
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  49. Wolfram Hinzen & Michelle Sheehan (2015). The Philosophy of Universal Grammar. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This interdisciplinary book considers the relationship between language and thought from a philosophical perspective, drawing both on the philosophical study of language and the purely formal study of grammar, and arguing that the two should align. The claim is that grammar provides homo sapiens with the ability to think in certain grammatical ways and that this in turn explains the vast cognitive powers of human beings. Evidence is considered from biology, the evolution of language, language disorders, and (...)
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  50. Margaret Boden (2006). Mind as Machine: A History of Cognitive Science. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Cognitive science is among the most fascinating intellectual achievements of the modern era. The quest to understand the mind is an ancient one. But modern science has offered new insights and techniques that have revolutionized this enquiry. Oxford University Press now presents a masterly history of the field, told by one of its most eminent practitioners. Psychology is the thematic heart of cognitive science, which aims to understand human minds. But its core theoretical ideas are drawn from cybernetics (...)
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