Search results for 'Cognitive impairment' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. M. W. Greenlee K. K. Alichniewicz, F. Brunner, H. H. Klünemann (2013). Neural Correlates of Saccadic Inhibition in Healthy Elderly and Patients with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 180.0
    Performance on tasks that require saccadic inhibition declines with age and altered inhibitory functioning has also been reported in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Although mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is assumed to be a high-risk factor for conversion to AD, little is known about changes in saccadic inhibition and its neural correlates in this condition. Our study determined whether the neural activation associated with saccadic inhibition is altered in persons with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Functional magnetic (...)
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  2. Dezso Nemeth, Karolina Janacsek, Katalin Király, Zsuzsa Londe, Kornél Németh, Kata Fazekas, Ilona Adam, Elemérné Király & Attila Csányi (2013). Probabilistic Sequence Learning in Mild Cognitive Impairment. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 180.0
    Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) causes slight but noticeable disruption in cognitive systems, primarily executive and memory functions. However, it is not clear if the development of sequence learning is affected by an impaired cognitive system and, if so, how. The goal of our study was to investigate the development of probabilistic sequence learning, from the initial acquisition to consolidation, in MCI and healthy elderly control groups. We used the Alternating Serial Reaction Time task (ASRT) to measure (...)
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  3. Janice E. Graham & Karen Ritchie (2006). Mild Cognitive Impairment: Ethical Considerations for Nosological Flexibility in Human Kinds. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):31-43.score: 150.0
  4. Michael Bavidge (2006). Under the Floorboards: Examining the Foundations of Mild Cognitive Impairment. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):75-77.score: 150.0
  5. John Bond & Lynne Corner (2006). Mild Cognitive Impairment: Where Does It Go From Here? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):29-30.score: 150.0
  6. Tim Thornton (2006). The Ambiguities of Mild Cognitive Impairment. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):21-27.score: 150.0
  7. Patrizia Turriziani, Daniela Smirni, Giuseppe Zappalà, Giuseppa R. Mangano, Massimiliano Oliveri & Lisa Cipolotti (2012). Enhancing Memory Performance with rTMS in Healthy Subjects and Individuals with Mild Cognitive Impairment: The Role of the Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 120.0
    A debated question in the literature is the degree of anatomical and functional lateralization of the executive control processes subserved by the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during recognition memory retrieval. We investigated if transient inhibition and excitation of the left and right DLPFC at retrieval by means of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) modulate recognition memory performance in 100 healthy controls (HCs) and in 8 patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Recognition memory tasks of faces, buildings and words (...)
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  8. Robert B. Malmo (1966). Cognitive Factors in Impairment: A Neuropsychological Study of Divided Set. Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (2):184.score: 120.0
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  9. Lisa Cipolotti Patrizia Turriziani, Daniela Smirni, Giuseppe Zappalà, Giuseppa R. Mangano, Massimiliano Oliveri (2012). Enhancing Memory Performance with rTMS in Healthy Subjects and Individuals with Mild Cognitive Impairment: The Role of the Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 120.0
    A debated question in the literature is the degree of anatomical and functional lateralization of the executive control processes subserved by the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during recognition memory retrieval. We investigated if transient inhibition and excitation of the left and right DLPFC at retrieval by means of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) modulate recognition memory performance in 100 healthy controls (HCs) and in 8 patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Recognition memory tasks of faces, buildings and words (...)
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  10. Olof Sandgren, Richard Andersson, Joost van de Weijer, Kristina Hansson & Birgitta Sahlén (2013). Impact of Cognitive and Linguistic Ability on Gaze Behavior in Children with Hearing Impairment. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 108.0
    In order to explore verbal-nonverbal integration, we investigated the influence of cognitive and linguistic ability on gaze behavior during spoken language conversation between children with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment (HI) and normal-hearing (NH) peers. Ten HI-NH and ten NH-NH dyads performed a referential communication task requiring description of faces. During task performance, eye movements and speech were tracked. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model associations between performance on cognitive and linguistic tasks and the probability of gaze (...)
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  11. Linda Barclay (2013). Cognitive Impairment and the Right to Vote: A Strategic Approach. Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):146-159.score: 104.0
    Most democratic countries either limit or deny altogether voting rights for people with cognitive impairments or mental health conditions. Against this weight of legal and practical exclusion, disability advocacy and developments in international human rights law increasingly push in the direction of full voting rights for people with cognitive impairments. Particularly influential has been the adoption by the UN of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in 2007. Article 29 declares that states must ‘ensure that (...)
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  12. Emma J. Thomas & Rebecca Elliott (2009). Brain Imaging Correlates of Cognitive Impairment in Depression. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 100.0
    This review briefly summarises recent research on the neural basis of cognition in depression. Two broad areas are covered: emotional and non-emotional processing. We consider how research findings support models of depression based on disrupted cortico-limbic circuitry, and how modern connectivity analysis techniques can be used to test such models explicitly. Finally we discuss clinical implications of cognitive imaging in depression, and specifically the possible role for these techniques in diagnosis and treatment planning.
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  13. Robert M. Bilder, Andrew Howe, Nic Novak, Fred W. Sabb & D. Stott Parker (2011). The Genetics of Cognitive Impairment in Schizophrenia: A Phenomic Perspective. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (9):428-435.score: 96.0
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  14. Guro Årdal Åsa Hammar (2009). Cognitive Functioning in Major Depression – A Summary. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 96.0
    The aim of the present paper is to summarize the research during the past decade regarding cognitive functioning in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Cognitive impairment in the acute phase of illness has been frequently reported. The findings are shown in different cognitive domains, such as executive functions (EF), attention, memory and psychomotor speed. Fewer reports have investigated cognitive functioning in MDD in longitudinal studies. Some longitudinal reports show that the impairment observed in the acute (...)
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  15. Atwood D. Gaines & Peter J. Whitehouse (2006). Building a Mystery: Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Beyond. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):61-74.score: 90.0
  16. Lynne Corner & John Bond (2006). The Impact of the Label of Mild Cognitive Impairment on the Individual's Sense of Self. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):3-12.score: 90.0
  17. Ronald C. Petersen (2006). Mild Cognitive Impairment Is Relevant. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):45-49.score: 90.0
  18. Steven R. Sabat (2006). Mild Cognitive Impairment: What's in a Name? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):13-20.score: 90.0
  19. Julian C. Hughes (2006). Introduction: The Heat of Mild Cognitive Impairment. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):1-2.score: 90.0
  20. Andy Hamilton (2006). Mild Cognitive Impairment: Which Kind Is It? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):51-52.score: 90.0
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  21. Janice E. Graham & Karen Ritchie (2006). Reifying Relevance in Mild Cognitive Impairment: An Appeal for Care and Caution. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):57-60.score: 90.0
  22. Stuart Butler (2009). Visual Mismatch Negativity in Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 90.0
  23. Peter J. Whitehouse (2006). Demystifying the Mystery of Alzheimer's as Late, No Longer Mild Cognitive Impairment. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):87-88.score: 90.0
  24. Dogra S. (2008). Protective Effect of Naringin, a Citrus Flavonoid, Against Cognitive Impairment and Oxidative Stress in an Animal Model of Sporadic Dementia of Alzheimer's Type. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 90.0
  25. Stephen Ticehurst (2006). Mild Cognitive Impairment: Kinds, Ethics, and Market Forces. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):53-55.score: 90.0
  26. Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Toto Sutarso (2013). Falling or Not Falling Into Temptation? Multiple Faces of Temptation, Monetary Intelligence, and Unethical Intentions Across Gender. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (3):529-552.score: 90.0
    We develop a theoretical model, explore the relationship between temptation (both reflective and formative) and unethical intentions by treating monetary intelligence (MI) as a mediator, and examine the direct (temptation to unethical intentions) and indirect (temptation to MI to unethical intentions) paths simultaneously based on multiple-wave panel data collected from 340 part-time employees and university (business) students. The positive indirect path suggested that yielding to temptation (e.g., high cognitive impairment and lack of self-control) led to poor MI (low (...)
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  27. Dong Catherine Yanhong & Slavin Melissa (2013). Improving Screening for Vascular Cognitive Impairment at 3–6 Months After Ischemic Stroke. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 90.0
  28. K. Giovanello, F. De Brigard, J. Ford, D. Kaufer, J. Browndyke & K. Welsh-Bohmer (2012). Event-Related Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Changes During Relational Retrieval in Normal Aging and Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society 18:886-897.score: 90.0
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  29. Gavin W. Hougham (2005). Waste Not, Want Not: Cognitive Impairment Should Not Preclude Research Participation. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):36 – 37.score: 90.0
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  30. Robert D. Orr, Joyce K. Johnston, S. Ashwal & L. L. Bailey (2000). Should Children with Severe Cognitive Impairment Receive Solid Organ Transplants? Journal of Clinical Ethics 11 (3):219.score: 90.0
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  31. T. Powell (2005). Voice: Cognitive Impairment and Medical Decision Making. Journal of Clinical Ethics 16 (4):303.score: 90.0
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  32. Giannakopoulos P. (2008). Top-Down Attentional Modulation of Electroencephalographic Responses in Normal Aging and Mild Cognitive Impairment. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 90.0
  33. Vandenberghe Rik (2012). Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Autoimmunity and Indolent Cognitive Impairment: A Consecutive Case Series From the University Hospitals Leuven Memory Clinic. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 90.0
  34. Madhyastha Sampath & Rai Ashwin (2013). Effect of Resveratrol on Stress Induced-Cognitive Impairment and the Possible Involvement of Brain Antioxidant Enzymes in Rats. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 90.0
  35. D. Gwyn Seymour, Anne E. Ball, Elizabeth M. Russell, William R. Primrose, Andrew M. Garratt & John R. Crawford (2001). Problems in Using Health Survey Questionnaires in Older Patients with Physical Disabilities. The Reliability and Validity of the SF‐36 and the Effect of Cognitive Impairment. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 7 (4):411-418.score: 90.0
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  36. Rumjanceva Sof'Ja, Silina Ekaterina, Stupin Victor, Orlova Alexandra, Silin Serjej, Men'Shova Natal'Ja, Shalygin Valerij & Bolevich Sergej (2013). Complex Energocorrection of Cognitive Functions in Vascular Cognitive Impairment. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 90.0
  37. Timothy Thornton (2006). The Ambiguities of Mild Cognitive Impairment. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):21-27.score: 90.0
  38. Venneri Annalena (2011). A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study of Semantic Deficits in Alzheimer?S Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 90.0
  39. Linden D. (2008). Effects of Working Memory Training on Oscillatory Activity in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Age-Matched Elderly Controls. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 90.0
  40. Rebecca Dresser (2003). Research Oversight and Adults with Cognitive Impairment. Hastings Center Report 33 (6):9-10.score: 90.0
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  41. K. Durkin, P. L. Mok & G. Conti-Ramsden (2012). Severity of Specific Language Impairment Predicts Delayed Development in Number Skills. Frontiers in Psychology 4 (September):581-581.score: 90.0
    The extent to which mathematical development is dependent upon language is controversial. This longitudinal study investigates the role of language ability in children's development of number skills. Participants were 229 children with specific language impairment (SLI) who were assessed initially at age 7 and again 1 year later. All participants completed measures of psycholinguistic development (expressive and receptive), performance IQ, and the Basic Number Skills subtest of the British Ability Scales. Number skills data for this sample were compared with (...)
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  42. T. Fernandez, J. Becerra, M. Roca, M. Espino, M. Y. Bahlke, T. Harmony, A. Fernandez-Bouza, H. Belmont & L. Diaz-Comas (forthcoming). Neurofeedback in Healthy Elderly Humans with Electroencephalographic Risk of Cognitive Impairment. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.score: 90.0
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  43. Díaz-Comas L. (2008). Neurofeedback in Healthy Elderly Humans with Electroencephalographic Risk of Cognitive Impairment. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 90.0
  44. Sinai M. (2008). The Influence of Working Memory and Other Cognitive Functions on Task Switching: Evidence From Healthy Aging and Mild Cognitive Impairment. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 90.0
  45. Kazanina Nina (2012). Visual Mismatch Negativity and Early Visual ERPs in Healthy Ageing, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 90.0
  46. T. B. L. Kirkwood (2006). Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and the Biology of Intrinsic Aging. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):79-82.score: 90.0
  47. Simo Vehmas (2010). The Who or What of Steve: Severe Cognitive Impairment and its Implications. In Matti Häyry (ed.), Arguments and Analysis in Bioethics. Rodopi.score: 90.0
     
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  48. Walter Glannon (2008). Moral Responsibility and the Psychopath. Neuroethics 1 (3):158-166.score: 84.0
    Psychopathy involves impaired capacity for prudential and moral reasoning due to impaired capacity for empathy, remorse, and sensitivity to fear-inducing stimuli. Brain abnormalities and genetic polymorphisms associated with these traits appear to justify the claim that psychopaths cannot be morally responsible for their behavior. Yet psychopaths are capable of instrumental reasoning in achieving their goals, which suggests that they have some capacity to respond to moral reasons against performing harmful acts and refrain from performing them. The cognitive and affective (...)
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  49. Adnan Qureshi & Amer Johri (2008). Issues Involving Informed Consent for Research Participants with Alzheimer's Disease. Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (3):197-203.score: 84.0
    Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia which is estimated to impact 350,000 people over 65 years of age in Canada. The lack of effective treatment and the growing number of people who are expected to be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in the near future are compelling reasons why continued research is in this area is necessary. With additional research, there needs to be greater recognition of the complexity of seeking ongoing informed consent from those with Alzheimer’s disease. (...)
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  50. James A. Cheyne, Jonathan S. A. Carriere & Daniel Smilek (2006). Absent-Mindedness: Lapses of Conscious Awareness and Everyday Cognitive Failures. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):578-592.score: 80.0
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