Search results for 'Cognitive impairment' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  51
    Janice E. Graham & Karen Ritchie (2006). Mild Cognitive Impairment: Ethical Considerations for Nosological Flexibility in Human Kinds. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):31-43.
  2.  48
    Michael Bavidge (2006). Under the Floorboards: Examining the Foundations of Mild Cognitive Impairment. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):75-77.
  3.  31
    John Bond & Lynne Corner (2006). Mild Cognitive Impairment: Where Does It Go From Here? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):29-30.
  4.  15
    Tim Thornton (2006). The Ambiguities of Mild Cognitive Impairment. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):21-27.
  5.  3
    Robert B. Malmo (1966). Cognitive Factors in Impairment: A Neuropsychological Study of Divided Set. Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (2):184.
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  6.  19
    Linda Barclay (2013). Cognitive Impairment and the Right to Vote: A Strategic Approach. Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):146-159.
    Most democratic countries either limit or deny altogether voting rights for people with cognitive impairments or mental health conditions. Against this weight of legal and practical exclusion, disability advocacy and developments in international human rights law increasingly push in the direction of full voting rights for people with cognitive impairments. Particularly influential has been the adoption by the UN of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in 2007. Article 29 declares that states must ‘ensure that (...)
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  7.  1
    Robert M. Bilder, Andrew Howe, Nic Novak, Fred W. Sabb & D. Stott Parker (2011). The Genetics of Cognitive Impairment in Schizophrenia: A Phenomic Perspective. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (9):428-435.
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  8.  1
    Gavin W. Hougham (2005). Waste Not, Want Not: Cognitive Impairment Should Not Preclude Research Participation. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):36 – 37.
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  9.  28
    Atwood D. Gaines & Peter J. Whitehouse (2006). Building a Mystery: Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Beyond. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):61-74.
  10.  8
    D. Gwyn Seymour, Anne E. Ball, Elizabeth M. Russell, William R. Primrose, Andrew M. Garratt & John R. Crawford (2001). Problems in Using Health Survey Questionnaires in Older Patients with Physical Disabilities. The Reliability and Validity of the SF‐36 and the Effect of Cognitive Impairment. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 7 (4):411-418.
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  11.  7
    K. Giovanello, F. De Brigard, J. Ford, D. Kaufer, J. Browndyke & K. Welsh-Bohmer (2012). Event-Related Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Changes During Relational Retrieval in Normal Aging and Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society 18:886-897.
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  12.  11
    Lynne Corner & John Bond (2006). The Impact of the Label of Mild Cognitive Impairment on the Individual's Sense of Self. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):3-12.
  13.  11
    Janice E. Graham & Karen Ritchie (2006). Reifying Relevance in Mild Cognitive Impairment: An Appeal for Care and Caution. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):57-60.
  14.  3
    T. B. L. Kirkwood (2006). Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and the Biology of Intrinsic Aging. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):79-82.
  15.  7
    Ronald C. Petersen (2006). Mild Cognitive Impairment Is Relevant. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):45-49.
  16.  6
    Steven R. Sabat (2006). Mild Cognitive Impairment: What's in a Name? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):13-20.
  17.  5
    Julian C. Hughes (2006). Introduction: The Heat of Mild Cognitive Impairment. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):1-2.
  18.  4
    Stephen Ticehurst (2006). Mild Cognitive Impairment: Kinds, Ethics, and Market Forces. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):53-55.
  19.  3
    Andy Hamilton (2006). Mild Cognitive Impairment: Which Kind Is It? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):51-52.
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  20.  3
    Peter J. Whitehouse (2006). Demystifying the Mystery of Alzheimer's as Late, No Longer Mild Cognitive Impairment. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):87-88.
  21.  1
    Robert D. Orr, Joyce K. Johnston, S. Ashwal & L. L. Bailey (2000). Should Children with Severe Cognitive Impairment Receive Solid Organ Transplants? Journal of Clinical Ethics 11 (3):219.
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  22.  1
    T. Powell (2005). Voice: Cognitive Impairment and Medical Decision Making. Journal of Clinical Ethics 16 (4):303.
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  23.  2
    Timothy Thornton (2006). The Ambiguities of Mild Cognitive Impairment. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):21-27.
  24. Rebecca Dresser (2003). Research Oversight and Adults with Cognitive Impairment. Hastings Center Report 33 (6):9-10.
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  25. Carole Rushton (forthcoming). Problematising the Problem: A Critical Interpretive Review of the Literature Pertaining to Older People with Cognitive Impairment Who Fall While Hospitalised. Nursing Inquiry:n/a-n/a.
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  26. Simo Vehmas (2010). The Who or What of Steve: Severe Cognitive Impairment and its Implications. In Matti Häyry (ed.), Arguments and Analysis in Bioethics. Rodopi
     
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  27. Jill D. Waring, Ashley N. Seiger, Paul R. Solomon, Andrew E. Budson & Elizabeth A. Kensinger (2014). Memory for the 2008 Presidential Election in Healthy Ageing and Mild Cognitive Impairment. Cognition and Emotion 28 (8):1407-1421.
  28.  8
    Heather K. J. Van der Lely, Stuart Rosen & Alan Adlard (2004). Grammatical Language Impairment and the Specificity of Cognitive Domains: Relations Between Auditory and Language Abilities. Cognition 94 (2):167-183.
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  29. H. Vanderlely, S. RoSen & A. AdlArd (2004). Grammatical Language Impairment and the Specificity of Cognitive Domains: Relations Between Auditory and Language Abilities. Cognition 94 (2):167-183.
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  30.  6
    Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Toto Sutarso (2013). Falling or Not Falling Into Temptation? Multiple Faces of Temptation, Monetary Intelligence, and Unethical Intentions Across Gender. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (3):529-552.
    We develop a theoretical model, explore the relationship between temptation (both reflective and formative) and unethical intentions by treating monetary intelligence (MI) as a mediator, and examine the direct (temptation to unethical intentions) and indirect (temptation to MI to unethical intentions) paths simultaneously based on multiple-wave panel data collected from 340 part-time employees and university (business) students. The positive indirect path suggested that yielding to temptation (e.g., high cognitive impairment and lack of self-control) led to poor MI (low (...)
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  31.  49
    James A. Cheyne, Jonathan S. A. Carriere & Daniel Smilek (2006). Absent-Mindedness: Lapses of Conscious Awareness and Everyday Cognitive Failures. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):578-592.
    A brief self-report scale was developed to assess everyday performance failures arising directly or primarily from brief failures of sustained attention . The ARCES was found to be associated with a more direct measure of propensity to attention lapses and to errors on an existing behavioral measure of sustained attention . Although the ARCES and MAAS were highly correlated, structural modelling revealed the ARCES was more directly related to SART errors and the MAAS to SART RTs, which have been hypothesized (...)
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  32.  46
    Licia Carlson & Eva Feder Kittay (2009). Introduction: Rethinking Philosophical Presumptions in Light of Cognitive Disability. Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):307-330.
  33. Walter Glannon (2008). Moral Responsibility and the Psychopath. Neuroethics 1 (3):158-166.
    Psychopathy involves impaired capacity for prudential and moral reasoning due to impaired capacity for empathy, remorse, and sensitivity to fear-inducing stimuli. Brain abnormalities and genetic polymorphisms associated with these traits appear to justify the claim that psychopaths cannot be morally responsible for their behavior. Yet psychopaths are capable of instrumental reasoning in achieving their goals, which suggests that they have some capacity to respond to moral reasons against performing harmful acts and refrain from performing them. The cognitive and affective (...)
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  34.  20
    Adnan Qureshi & Amer Johri (2008). Issues Involving Informed Consent for Research Participants with Alzheimer's Disease. Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (3):197-203.
    Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia which is estimated to impact 350,000 people over 65 years of age in Canada. The lack of effective treatment and the growing number of people who are expected to be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in the near future are compelling reasons why continued research is in this area is necessary. With additional research, there needs to be greater recognition of the complexity of seeking ongoing informed consent from those with Alzheimer’s disease. (...)
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  35. Yuliya Zaytseva, Raymond C. K. Chan, Ernst Pöppel & Andreas Heinz (2015). Luria Revisited: Cognitive Research in Schizophrenia, Past Implications and Future Challenges. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10 (1):4.
    Contemporary psychiatry is becoming more biologically oriented in the attempt to elicit a biological rationale of mental diseases. Although mental disorders comprise mostly functional abnormalities, there is a substantial overlap between neurology and psychiatry in addressing cognitive disturbances. In schizophrenia, the presence of cognitive impairment prior to the onset of psychosis and early after its manifestation suggests that some neurocognitive abnormalities precede the onset of psychosis and may represent a trait marker. These cognitive alterations may arise (...)
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  36.  13
    Frederic Gilbert, Andrej Vranic & Samia Hurst (2013). Involuntary & Voluntary Invasive Brain Surgery: Ethical Issues Related to Acquired Aggressiveness. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 6 (1):115-128.
    Clinical cases of frontal lobe lesions have been significantly associated with acquired aggressive behaviour. Restoring neuronal and cognitive faculties of aggressive individuals through invasive brain intervention raises ethical questions in general. However, more questions have to be addressed in cases where individuals refuse surgical treatment. The ethical desirability and permissibility of using intrusive surgical brain interventions for involuntary or voluntary treatment of acquired aggressiveness is highly questionable. This article engages with the description of acquired aggressiveness in general, and presents (...)
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  37.  18
    William A. Phillips & Steven M. Silverstein (2003). Convergence of Biological and Psychological Perspectives on Cognitive Coordination in Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):65-82.
    The concept of locally specialized functions dominates research on higher brain function and its disorders. Locally specialized functions must be complemented by processes that coordinate those functions, however, and impairment of coordinating processes may be central to some psychotic conditions. Evidence for processes that coordinate activity is provided by neurobiological and psychological studies of contextual disambiguation and dynamic grouping. Mechanisms by which this important class of cognitive functions could be achieved include those long-range connections within and between cortical (...)
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  38. Gary R. Turner & Brian Levine (2004). Disorders of Executive Functioning and Self-Awareness. In Jennie Ponsford (ed.), Cognitive and Behavioral Rehabilitation: From Neurobiology to Clinical Practice. Guilford Press 224-268.
     
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  39.  10
    Jingqiu Chen, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Ningyu Tang (2013). Temptation, Monetary Intelligence (Love of Money), and Environmental Context on Unethical Intentions and Cheating. Journal of Business Ethics 123 (2):1-23.
    In Study 1, we test a theoretical model involving temptation, monetary intelligence (MI), a mediator, and unethical intentions and investigate the direct and indirect paths simultaneously based on multiple-wave panel data collected in open classrooms from 492 American and 256 Chinese students. For the whole sample, temptation is related to low unethical intentions indirectly. Multi-group analyses reveal that temptation predicts unethical intentions both indirectly and directly for male American students only; but not for female American students. For Chinese students, both (...)
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  40.  33
    Joseph T. Giacino & Childs N. Ashwal S. (2002). The Minimally Conscious State: Definition and Diagnostic Criteria. Neurology 58 (3):349-353.
  41.  12
    Stephanie R. Solomon (2013). Protecting and Respecting the Vulnerable: Existing Regulations or Further Protections? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (1):17-28.
    Scholars and policymakers continue to struggle over the meaning of the word “vulnerable” in the context of research ethics. One major reason for the stymied discussions regarding vulnerable populations is that there is no clear distinction between accounts of research vulnerabilities that exist for certain populations and discussions of research vulnerabilities that require special regulations in the context of research ethics policies. I suggest an analytic process by which to ascertain whether particular vulnerable populations should be contenders for additional regulatory (...)
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  42.  33
    Paolo Bartolomeo (2006). A Parietofrontal Network for Spatial Awareness in the Right Hemisphere of the Human Brain. Archives of Neurology 63 (9):1238-1241.
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  43.  51
    James L. Bernat (2002). Questions Remaining About the Minimally Conscious State. Neurology 58 (3):337-338.
  44.  3
    Frederic Gilbert & Andrej Vranič (2015). Paedophilia, Invasive Brain Surgery, and Punishment. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (3):521-526.
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  45.  18
    Jami L. Anderson, Comprehending the Distinctively Sexual Nature of the Conduct. Sex, Drugs and Rock and Roll.
    Since the 1970s, sexual assault laws have evolved to include prohibitions of sexual acts with cognitively impaired individuals. The argument justifying this prohibition is typically as follows: A sex act that is forced (without the legally valid consent of) someone is sexual assault. Cognitively impaired individuals, because they lack certain intellectual abilities, cannot give legally valid consent. Therefore, cognitively impaired individuals cannot consent to sex. Therefore, sex acts with cognitively impaired individuals is sexual assault. The prohibition of sex with such (...)
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  46.  33
    Peter W. Halligan (2006). Awareness and Knowing: Implications for Rehabilitation. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):456-473.
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  47.  24
    Edward Slingerland (2011). “Of What Use Are the Odes? ” Cognitive Science, Virtue Ethics, and Early Confucian Ethics. Philosophy East and West 61 (1):80-109.
    In his well-known 1994 work Descartes’ Error, the neuroscientist Antonio Damasio describes his work with patients suffering from damage to the prefrontal cortex, a center of emotion processing in the brain. The accidents or strokes that had caused this damage had spared these patients’ “higher” cognitive faculties: their short- and long-term memories, abstract reasoning skills, mathematical aptitude, and performance on standard IQ tests were completely unimpaired. They were also perfectly healthy physically, with no apparent motor or sensory disabilities. Nonetheless, (...)
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  48.  24
    Tessa Hart, John Whyte, Junghoon Kim & Monica Vaccaro (2005). Executive Function and Self-Awareness of "Real-World" Behavior and Attention Deficits Following Traumatic Brain Injury. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. Special Issue 20 (4):333-347.
  49.  20
    Siow Ann Chong, Richard Huxtable & Alastair Campbell (2011). Authorizing Psychiatric Research: Principles, Practices and Problems. Bioethics 25 (1):27-36.
    Psychiatric research is advancing rapidly, with studies revealing new investigative tools and technologies that are aimed at improving the treatment and care of patients with psychiatric disorders. However, the ethical framework in which such research is conducted is not as well developed as we might expect. In this paper we argue that more thought needs to be given to the principles that underpin research in psychiatry and to the problems associated with putting those principles into practice. In particular, we comment (...)
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  50.  62
    Jonathan Tallant (2013). Pretense, Mathematics, and Cognitive Neuroscience. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (4):axs013.
    A pretense theory of a given discourse is a theory that claims that we do not believe or assert the propositions expressed by the sentences we token (speak, write, and so on) when taking part in that discourse. Instead, according to pretense theory, we are speaking from within a pretense. According to pretense theories of mathematics, we engage with mathematics as we do a pretense. We do not use mathematical language to make claims that express propositions and, thus, we do (...)
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