Search results for 'Coincidence' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Judith Crane (2012). Biological-Mereological Coincidence. Philosophical Studies 161 (2):309-325.score: 24.0
    This paper presents and defends an account of the coincidence of biological organisms with mereological sums of their material components. That is, an organism and the sum of its material components are distinct material objects existing in the same place at the same time. Instead of relying on historical or modal differences to show how such coincident entities are distinct, this paper argues that there is a class of physiological properties of biological organisms that their coincident mereological sums do (...)
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  2. Mark Steen (2011). More Problems for MaxCon: Contingent Particularity and Stuff-Thing Coincidence. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 26 (2):135-154.score: 24.0
    Ned Markosian argues (Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76:213-228, 1998a; Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82:332-340, 2004a, The Monist 87:405-428, 2004b) that simples are ‘maximally continuous’ entities. This leads him to conclude that there could be non-particular ‘stuff’ in addition to things. I first show how an ensuing debate on this issue McDaniel (Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81(2):265-275, 2003); Markosian (Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82:332-340, 2004a) ended in deadlock. I attempt to break the deadlock. Markosian’s view entails stuff-thing coincidence, which I (...)
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  3. Pablo Rychter (2011). How Coincidence Bears on Persistence. Philosophia 39 (4):759-770.score: 24.0
    The ‘paradoxes of coincidence’ are generally taken as an important factor for deciding between rival views on persistence through time. In particular, the ability to deal with apparent cases of temporary coincidence is usually regarded as a good reason for favouring perdurantism (or ‘four-dimensionalism’) over endurantism (or ‘three-dimensionalism’). However, the recent work of Gilmore ( 2007 ) and McGrath ( 2007 ) challenges this standard view. For different reasons, both Gilmore and McGrath conclude that perdurantism does not really (...)
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  4. Wayne D. Riggs (2014). Luck, Knowledge, and “Mere” Coincidence. Metaphilosophy 45 (4-5):627-639.score: 24.0
    There are good reasons for pursuing a theory of knowledge by way of understanding the connection between knowledge and luck. Not surprisingly, then, there has been a burgeoning of interest in “luck theories” of knowledge as well as in theories of luck in general. Unfortunately, “luck” proves to be as recalcitrant an analysandum as “knows.” While it is well worth pursuing a general theory of luck despite these difficulties, our theory of knowledge might be made more manageable if we could (...)
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  5. John Martineau (1995/2002). A Little Book of Coincidence. Walker & Company.score: 24.0
    A most unusual guide to the solar system, A Little Book of Coincidence suggests that there may be fundamental relationships between space, time, and life that have not yet been fully understood. From the observations of Ptolemy and Kepler to the Harmony of the Spheres and the hidden structure of the solar system, John Martineau reveals the exquisite orbital patterns of the planets and the mathematical relationships that govern them. A table shows the relative measurements of each planet in (...)
     
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  6. E. J. Lowe (2002). Material Coincidence and the Cinematographic Fallacy: A Response to Olson. Philosophical Quarterly 52 (208):369-372.score: 22.0
    Eric T. Olson has argued that those who hold that two material objects can exactly coincide at a moment of time, with one of these objects constituting the other, face an insuperable difficulty in accounting for the alleged differences between the objects, such as their being of different kinds and possessing different persistence-conditions. The differences, he suggests, are inexplicable, given that the objects in question are composed of the same particles related in precisely the same way. In response, I show (...)
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  7. Sydney Shoemaker (2003). Realization, Micro-Realization, and Coincidence. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (1):1-23.score: 22.0
    Let thin properties be properties shared by coincident entities, e.g., a person and her body, and thick properties ones that are not shared. Thick properties entail sortal properties, e.g., being a person, and the associated persistence conditions. On the first account of realization defined here, the realized property and its realizers will belong to the same individual. This restricts the physical realizers of mental properties, which are thick, to thick physical properties. We also need a sense in which mental properties (...)
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  8. Matthew S. Bedke (2009). Intuitive Non-Naturalism Meets Cosmic Coincidence. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (2):188-209.score: 18.0
    Having no recourse to ways of knowing about the natural world, ethical non-naturalists are in need of an epistemology that might apply to a normative breed of facts or properties, and intuitionism seems well suited to fill that bill. Here I argue that the metaphysical inspiration for ethical intuitionism undermines that very epistemology, for this pair of views generates what I call the defeater from cosmic coincidence. Unfortunately, we face not a happy union, but a difficult choice: either ethical (...)
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  9. M. Eddon (2010). Why Four-Dimensionalism Explains Coincidence. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):721-728.score: 18.0
    In ?Does Four-Dimensionalism Explain Coincidence?? Mark Moyer argues that there is no reason to prefer the four-dimensionalist (or perdurantist) explanation of coincidence to the three-dimensionalist (or endurantist) explanation. I argue that Moyer's formulations of perdurantism and endurantism lead him to overlook the perdurantist's advantage. A more satisfactory formulation of these views reveals a puzzle of coincidence that Moyer does not consider, and the perdurantist's treatment of this puzzle is clearly preferable.
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  10. Paul Audi (2013). Causation, Coincidence, and Commensuration. Philosophical Studies 162 (2):447-464.score: 18.0
    What does it take to solve the exclusion problem? An ingenious strategy is Stephen Yablo’s idea that causes must be commensurate with their effects. Commensuration is a relation between events. Roughly, events are commensurate with one another when one contains all that is required for the occurrence of the other, and as little as possible that is not required. According to Yablo, one event is a cause of another only if they are commensurate. I raise three reasons to doubt that (...)
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  11. Mark Moyer, Defending Coincidence: An Explanation of a Sort.score: 18.0
    Can different material objects have the same parts at all times at which they exist? This paper defends the possibility of such coincidence against the main argument to the contrary, the ‘Indiscernibility Argument’. According to this argument, the modal supervenes on the nonmodal, since, after all, the non-modal is what grounds the modal; hence, it would be utterly mysterious if two objects sharing all parts had different essential properties. The weakness of the argument becomes apparent once we understand how (...)
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  12. Sydney Shoemaker (1999). Self, Body, and Coincidence. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 73 (73):287-306.score: 18.0
    A major objection to the view that the relation of persons to human animals is coincidence rather than identity is that on this view the human animal will share the coincident person's physical properties, and so should (contrary to the view) share its mental properties. But while the same physical predicates are true of the person and the human animal, the difference in the persistence conditions of these entities implies that there will be a difference in the properties ascribed (...)
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  13. Mark Moyer (2009). Does Four-Dimensionalism Explain Coincidence?∗. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (3):479-488.score: 18.0
    For those who think the statue and the piece of copper that compose it are distinct objects that coincide, there is a burden of explanation. After all, common sense says that different ordinary objects cannot occupy the same space at the same time. A common argument in favour of four-dimensionalism (or ?perdurantism? or ?temporal parts theory?) is that it provides the resources for a superior explanation of this coincidence. This, however, is mistaken. Any explanatory work done by the four-dimensionalist (...)
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  14. Thomas Sattig (2010). Compatibilism About Coincidence. Philosophical Review 119 (3):273-313.score: 18.0
    It seems to be a platitude of common sense that distinct ordinary objects cannot coincide, that they cannot fit into the same place or be composed of the same parts at the same time. The paradoxes of coincidence are instances of a breakdown of this platitude in light of counterexamples that are licensed by innocuous assumptions about particular kinds of ordinary object. Since both the anticoincidence principle and the assumptions driving the counterexamples flow from the folk conception of ordinary (...)
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  15. Mark Moyer (2006). Statues and Lumps: A Strange Coincidence? Synthese 148 (2):401 - 423.score: 18.0
    Puzzles about persistence and change through time, i.e., about identity across time, have foundered on confusion about what it is for ‘two things’ to be have ‘the same thing’ at a time. This is most directly seen in the dispute over whether material objects can occupy exactly the same place at the same time. This paper defends the possibility of such coincidence against several arguments to the contrary. Distinguishing a temporally relative from an absolute sense of ‘the same’, we (...)
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  16. Jonathan Knowles (1999). Physicalism, Teleology and the Miraculous Coincidence Problem. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (195):164-81.score: 18.0
    I focus on Fodor’s model of the relationship between special sciences and basic physics, and on a criticism of this model, that it implies that the causal stability of, e.g., the mental in its production of behaviour is nothing short of a miraculous coincidence. David Papineau and Graham Macdonaldendorse this criticism. But it is far less clear than they assume that Fodor’s picture indeed involves coincidences, which in any case their injection of a teleological supplement cannot explain. Papineau’s and (...)
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  17. Wayne E. Tefft (1973). The Relevance of Time-Delayed Coincidence Mössbauer Experiments for the Interpretation of the Uncertainty Principle. Foundations of Physics 3 (2):255-263.score: 18.0
    Time-delayed coincidence Mössbauer experiments, in which the spread in energy may be either greater or less than the natural linewidth, are discussed. This discussion leads to the conclusion that in the uncertainty relation ΔE Δt ≥ $\begin{array}{*{20}c} / \\ h \\ \end{array} /2$ , Δt should be interpreted as the duration time of the measurement and not as the lifetime of the state. Further analysis shows that confinement of photons to the region of space between emitter and absorber should (...)
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  18. Nicholas Buxton (2006). The CROW and the Coconut: Accident, Coincidence, and Causation in The. Philosophy East and West 56 (3).score: 18.0
    : This article explores the way in which the Yogavāsistha's account of causation as coincidence relates to its soteriological agenda and the view that the 'existence' of the world—deemed to be an illusion anyway—is a mere accident. Comparison is made to similar ideas about causality articulated by David Hume, who nonetheless stops short of drawing quite such radical metaphysical conclusions, in spite of his epistemological skepticism concerning the existence of external objects.
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  19. Péter Varga (1989). On the Possible Linear Term in Light Coincidence Experiments. Foundations of Physics 19 (12):1515-1523.score: 18.0
    An attempt is made to clarify the confusion about the interpretation of an early experiment aiming to demonstrate the dual nature of light. While interferometer experiments show that photons interact with both mirrors of a Michelson interferometer, it was verified that a photon interacts with one of the detectors put in place of the mirrors. Any deviation from the effect predicted by QED would lead to a term in the coincidence rate linearly proportional to the number of photons; the (...)
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  20. Nicholas Buxton (2006). The Crow and the Coconut: Accident, Coincidence, and Causation in the "Yogavāsiṣṭha". Philosophy East and West 56 (3):392 - 408.score: 18.0
    This article explores the way in which the Yogavāsiṣṭha's account of causation as coincidence relates to its soteriological agenda and the view that the 'existence' of the world-deemed to be an illusion anyway-is a mere accident. Comparison is made to similar ideas about causality articulated by David Hume, who nonetheless stops short of drawing quite such radical metaphysical conclusions, in spite of his epistemological skepticism concerning the existence of external objects.
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  21. J. C. A. Gaskin (1975). Miracles and the Religiously Significant Coincidence. Ratio 17:72 - 81.score: 18.0
    THERE ARE TWO CONCEPTS OF MIRACLE: AS (A) THE VIOLATION OF A NATURAL LAW, AND AS (B) A STRIKING COINCIDENCE WITHIN NATURAL LAW. DIFFICULTIES IN (A) HAVE BEEN WIDELY DISCUSSED, E.G., BY R SWINBURNE. THOSE IN (B) HAVE NOT. I ARGUE THAT IF DIFFICULTIES IN (A) FORCE A RETREAT TO (B), THEN A PLACE MUST BE FOUND FOR A GOD TO ACT TO PRODUCE (B). SEVERAL POSSIBILITIES ARE CONSIDERED; NONE ARE FOUND SATISFACTORY EXCEPT POSSIBLY THE GOD INFLUENCING UNNOTICED AN (...)
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  22. Raul Saucedo, Persistence and Coincidence.score: 18.0
    Four-dimensionalists claim that their take on the temporal versions of the puzzles of coincidence favors their view over three-dimensionalism. In this paper I argue otherwise. In particular, I argue that the four-dimensionalist’s treatment of such puzzles doesn’t give her an edge over so-called `standard theorists’, i.e. three-dimensionalists according to whom there are distinct material objects that coincide at some time. I look at two ways in which the dispute between four-dimensionalists and standard theorists might be construed. First, as an (...)
     
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  23. Kit Fine (2008). Coincidence and Form. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 82 (1):101-118.score: 16.0
    How can a statue and a piece of alloy be coincident at any time at which they exist and yet differ in their modal properties? I argue that this question demands an answer and that the only plausible answer is one that posits a difference in the form of the two objects.
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  24. L. A. Paul (2006). Coincidence as Overlap. Noûs 40 (4):623–659.score: 16.0
    I discuss puzzles involving coinciding material objects (such as statues and their constitutive lumps of clay) and propose solutions.
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  25. Giuseppe Spolaore (2012). Not Just a Coincidence. Conditional Counter-Examples to Locke's Thesis. Thought 1 (2):108-115.score: 16.0
    So-called Locke's thesis is the view that no two things of the same kind may coincide, that is, may be completely in the same place at the same time. A number of counter-examples to this view have been proposed. In this paper, some new and arguably more convincing counter-examples to Locke's thesis are presented. In these counter-examples, a particular entity (a string, a rope, a net, or similar) is interwoven to obtain what appears to be a distinct, thicker entity of (...)
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  26. Rada Iveković (2000). Coincidence of Comparison. Hypatia 15 (4):224 - 235.score: 16.0
    Rada Iveković reflects on the significance of modernity in contemporary Indian philosophy. Where the orient has been figured as the other for western philosophers, she asks how Indian philosophy depicts the west, how philosophers such as Kant have been interpreted, and how thematics such as pluralism, tolerance, relativity, innovation, and curiosity about the foreign have been figured in both ancient and contemporary Indian philosophy. While working on the western side with such authors as Lyotard, Deleuze, Serres, or Irigaray, Iveković doesn't (...)
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  27. Matthew H. Slater (2003). Minimalism and Coincidence: Comments on Varzi. Dialectica 57 (3):323–329.score: 16.0
    Achille Varzi [2000] has suggested a nice response to the familiar argument purporting to establish the existence of perfectly coinciding objects – objects which, if they existed, would trouble mereological extensionality and the “Minimalist View” of ontology. The trick is to defend Minimalism without tarnishing its status as a meta-principle: that is, without making any firstorder ontological claims. Varzi’s response, though seeming to allow for a comfortable indifference about metaphysical matters peripheral to Minimalism, is not general enough to stave off (...)
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  28. Ikuro Suzuki (2008). Coincidence and the Semantic Solution. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 15:237-242.score: 16.0
    Many philosophers deny that two different material objects can “coincide”, i.e. share their spatial location and microscopic parts. But, there seems to be a difficulty in identifying these coinciding objects, since we have many kinds of predicates that appear to show differences between them. One prominent strategy to avoid such a difficulty is to argue that such “problematic” predicates merely indicate our ways of describing objects, and thus that any difference between coinciding objects is only apparent. I call this move (...)
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  29. Thomas Sattig, Coincidence and Cardinality.score: 16.0
    Coincidentalism is the view that distinct material things can be composed of the same microphysical simples at the same time. The existence of distinct coincidents is incompatible with any microphysical criterion of identity over time of material composites. This incompatibility constitutes a problem for the coincidentalist only if the coincidentalist needs a microphysical criterion of identity over time. What does the coincidentalist need such a criterion for? I will show that the coincidentalist needs such a criterion for an explanation of (...)
     
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  30. Karen Bennett (2004). Spatio-Temporal Coincidence and the Grounding Problem. Philosophical Studies 118 (3):339-371.score: 15.0
    A lot of people believe that distinct objectscan occupy precisely the same place for theentire time during which they exist. Suchpeople have to provide an answer to the`grounding problem' – they have to explain howsuch things, alike in so many ways, nonethelessmanage to fall under different sortals, or havedifferent modal properties. I argue in detailthat they cannot say that there is anything invirtue of which spatio-temporally coincidentthings have those properties. However, I alsoargue that this may not be as bad as (...)
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  31. John Divers (2008). Coincidence and Form. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 82 (1):119-137.score: 15.0
    I compare a Lewisian defence of monism with Kit Fine's defence of pluralism. I argue that the Lewisian defence is, at present, the clearer in its explanatory intent and ontological commitments. I challenge Fine to explain more fully the nature of the entities that he postulates and the relationship between continuous material objects and the parts of those rigid embodiments in terms of which he proposes to explain crucial, modal and sortal, features of those objects.
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  32. Eric T. Olson (1996). Composition and Coincidence. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 77 (4):374-403.score: 15.0
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  33. Christopher Hughes (1997). Same-Kind Coincidence and the Ship of Theseus. Mind 106 (421):53-67.score: 15.0
    Locke thought that it was impossible for there to be two things of the same kind in the same place at the same time. I offer (what looks to me like) a counterexample to that principle, involving two ships in the same place at the same time. I then consider two ways of explaining away, and one way of denying, the apparent counterexample of Locke's principle, and I argue that none is successful. I conclude that, although the case under discussion (...)
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  34. Jamie Dreier (2012). Quasi-Realism and the Problem of Unexplained Coincidence. Analytic Philosophy 53 (3):269-287.score: 15.0
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  35. Peter Dews (1999). The Eclipse of Coincidence: Lacan, Merleau-Ponty and Schelling. Angelaki 4 (3):15 – 23.score: 15.0
  36. Penelope Mackie (2008). Coincidence and Identity. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 83 (62):151-176.score: 15.0
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  37. Eric T. Olson (2001). Material Coincidence and the Indiscernibility Problem. Philosophical Quarterly 51 (204):337-355.score: 15.0
    It is often said that the same particles can simultaneously make up two or more material objects that differ in kind and in their mental, biological, and other qualitative properties. Others wonder how objects made of the same parts in the same arrangement and surroundings could differ in these ways. I clarify this worry and show that attempts to dismiss or solve it miss its point. At most one can argue that it is a problem we can live with.
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  38. E. J. Lowe (2003). Substantial Change and Spatiotemporal Coincidence. Ratio 16 (2):140–160.score: 15.0
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  39. Christopher Hughes (1997). An Incredible Coincidence? Mind 106 (424):769-772.score: 15.0
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  40. Penelope Mackie (2007). Coincidence and Modal Predicates. Analysis 67 (1):21–31.score: 15.0
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  41. Herbert Spiegelberg (1956). Husserl's and Peirce's Phenomenologies: Coincidence or Interaction. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 17 (2):164-185.score: 15.0
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  42. David S. Oderberg (1996). Coincidence Under a Sortal. Philosophical Review 105 (2):145-171.score: 15.0
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  43. Samuel Levey (1997). Coincidence and Principles of Composition. Analysis 57 (1):1–10.score: 15.0
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  44. Hector-Neri Castañeda (1974). Leibniz's Concepts and Their Coincidence Salva Veritate. Noûs 8 (4):381-398.score: 15.0
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  45. Christopher Hughes (2011). Conspecific Coincidence and Mutual Incorporation. Philosophical Perspectives 25 (1):241-252.score: 15.0
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  46. Nathan Hanna (2010). Cosmic Coincidence and Intuitive Non-Naturalism. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy.score: 15.0
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  47. Peter M. Simons (1985). Coincidence of Things of a Kind. Mind 94 (373):70-75.score: 15.0
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  48. N. T. Gridgeman (1975). The Roots of Coincidence: An Excursion Into Parapsychology, Arthur Koestler. World Futures 14 (3):307-312.score: 15.0
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  49. Antonio Calcagno (1998). Giordano Bruno and the Logic of Coincidence: Unity and Multiplicity in the Philosophical Thought of Giordano Bruno. Peter Lang.score: 15.0
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  50. Susan Sterrett, Historical Context and Philosophy of Science: Reply to Peter Simons' 'Coincidence and Kite-Flying'.score: 15.0
    This essay responds to a review of my book Wittgenstein Flies A Kite: A Story of Models of Wings and Models of the World by Peter Simons that appears in the March 2009 issue of the journal Metascience.
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