Search results for 'Colin Andrew' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    Colin Andrew (2000). Sensorimotor EEG Rhythms and Their Connection to Local/Global Neocortical Dynamic Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):399-400.
    The EEG activity recorded from the human sensorimotor cortical area exhibits rhythmic activity covering a broad range of frequencies, including alpha, mu, beta, and gamma (40-Hz) rhythms. This commentary elaborates on connections between these sensorimotor rhythms and Nunez's neocortical dynamic theory.
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  2.  1
    R. Hsia (1997). Andrew Colin Gow, The Red Jews: Antisemitism in an Apocalyptic Age, 1200–1600.(Studies in Medieval and Reformation Thought, 55.) Leiden: EJ Brill, 1995. Pp. Ix, 420; 6 Black-and-White Illustrations. [REVIEW] Speculum 72 (2):476-478.
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  3.  9
    Colin Mooers (2003). Cultural Studies and Political Theory Edited by Jodi Dean and Culture and Economy After the Cultural Turn Edited by Larry Ray and Andrew Sayer. Historical Materialism 11 (3):215-224.
  4.  8
    Colin M. Macleod (2001). Andrew Levine, Rethinking Liberal Equality From a “Utopian” Point of View:Rethinking Liberal Equality From a “Utopian” Point of View. Ethics 111 (2):429-432.
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  5. Colin Gunton (1994). Andrew Shanks. Hegel's Political Theology. Pp. Xiii+234. . £32.50. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 30 (2):254.
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  6.  20
    James Maclaurin (ed.) (2012). Rationis Defensor: Essays in Honour of Colin Cheyne. Springer.
    Edited book containing the following essays: 1 Getting over Gettier, Alan Musgrave.- 2 Justified Believing: Avoiding the Paradox Gregory W. Dawes.- 3 Literature and Truthfulness,Gregory Currie.- 4 Where the Buck-passing Stops, Andrew Moore.- 5 Universal Darwinism: Its Scope and Limits, James Maclaurin, - 6 The Future of Utilitarianism,Tim Mulgan. 7 Kant on Experiment, Alberto Vanzo.- 8 Did Newton ʻFeignʼ the Corpuscular Hypothesis? Kirsten Walsh.- 9 The Progress of Scotland: The Edinburgh Philosophical Societies and the Experimental Method, Juan (...)
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  7.  35
    Colin Andrew Ross (2010). Hypothesis: The Electrophysiological Basis of Evil Eye Belief. Anthropology of Consciousness 21 (1):47-57.
    The sense of being stared at is the basis of evil eye beliefs, which are regarded as superstitions because the emission of any form of energy from the human eye has been rejected by Western science. However, brainwaves in the 1–40 Hertz, 1–10 microvolt range emitted through the eye can be detected using a high-impedance electrode housed inside electromagnetically insulated goggles. This signal, which the author calls “human ocular extramission,” is physiologically active and has distinct electrophysiological properties from simultaneous brainwave (...)
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  8.  9
    Andrew Mathews & Colin MacLeod (2002). Induced Processing Biases Have Causal Effects on Anxiety. Cognition and Emotion 16 (3):331-354.
  9. Andrew McAninch, Grant Goodrich & Colin Allen (2009). Animal Communication and Neo-Expressivism. In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press 128--144.
    One of the earliest issues in cognitive ethology concerned the meaning of animal signals. In the 1970s and 1980s this debate was most active with respect to the question of whether animal alarm calls convey information about the emotional states of animals or whether they “refer” directly to predators in the environment (Seyfarth, Cheney, & Marler 1980; see Radick 2007 for a historical account), but other areas, such as vocalizations about food and social contact, were also widely discussed. In the (...)
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  10. Andrew Chignell & Colin McLear (2010). Three Skeptics and the Critique: Review of Michael Forster's Kant and Skepticism. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 51 (4):228-244.
    A long critical notice of Michael Forster's recent book, "Kant and Skepticism." We argue that Forster's characterization of Kant's response to skepticism is both textually dubious and philosophically flawed. -/- .
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  11.  3
    Patrick J. Connolly (2016). Maclaurin on Occasionalism: A Reply to Ablondi. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (1):125-135.
    In a recent article Fred Ablondi compares the different approaches to occasionalism put forward by two eighteenth-century Newtonians, Colin Maclaurin and Andrew Baxter. The goal of this short essay is to respond to Ablondi by clarifying some key features of Maclaurin's views on occasionalism and the cause of gravitational attraction. In particular, I explore Maclaurin's matter theory, his views on the explanatory limits of mechanism, and his appeals to the authority of Newton. This leads to a clearer picture (...)
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  12.  15
    Michael C. Appleby, Neil Cutler, John Gazzard, Peter Goddard, John A. Milne, Colin Morgan & Andrew Redfern (2003). What Price Cheap Food? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (4):395-408.
    This paper is the report of a meetingthat gathered many of the UK's most senioranimal scientists with representatives of thefarming industry, consumer groups, animalwelfare groups, and environmentalists. Therewas strong consensus that the current economicstructure of agriculture cannot adequatelyaddress major issues of concern to society:farm incomes, food security and safety, theneeds of developing countries, animal welfare,and the environment. This economic structure isbased primarily on competition betweenproducers and between retailers, driving foodprices down, combined with externalization ofmany costs. These issues must be addressed (...)
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  13.  10
    Andrew Jack & Colin McGinn (1992). The Problem of Consciousness. Philosophical Quarterly 42 (166):106.
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  14.  7
    Warren Goldfarb, Erich Reck, Jeremy Avigad, Andrew Arana, Geoffrey Hellman, Colin McLarty, Dana Scott & Michael Kremer (2004). Palmer House Hilton Hotel, Chicago, Illinois April 23–24, 2004. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 10 (3).
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  15.  1
    Roger Emerson (1981). The Philosophical Society of Edinburgh 1748–1768. British Journal for the History of Science 14 (2):133-176.
    The Philosophical Society of Edinburgh which had flourished for a few years after 1738 was as good as dead in 1748. Lord Morton, its President, now lived most of the time in London whence he wrote to Sir John Clerk in 1747 that he regarded the Society as ‘annihilated’, apparently thinking that the death of Colin MacLaurin in 1746 and the temporary retirement to the countryside of its other Secretary, Andrew Plummer, had put an end to it. Sir (...)
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  16.  5
    David Saunders & Ian Hunter (2003). Bringing the State to England: Andrew Tooke's Translation of Samuel Pufendorf's 'De Officio Hominis Et Civis'. History of Political Thought 24 (2):218-234.
    Andrew Tooke's 1691 English translation of Samuel Pufendorf's De officio hominis et civis, published as The Whole Duty of Man According to the Law of Nature, brought Pufendorf's manual fo statist natural law into English politics at a moment of temporary equilibrium in the unfinished contest between Crown and Parliament for the rights and powers of sovereignty. Drawing on the authors' re-edition of The Whole Duty of Man, this article describes and analyses a telling instance of how--by translation--the (...)
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  17.  7
    Fred Ablondi (2013). Newtonian Vs. Newtonian: Baxter and MacLaurin on the Inactivity of Matter. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (1):15-23.
    In my essay I look at the specifics of the dispute between the Scottish metaphysician Andrew Baxter and the mathematician Colin MacLaurin in an attempt to identify the source or sources of their contradictory, yet in both cases Newtonian, positions regarding occasionalism. After some general introductory remarks about each thinker, I examine the metaphysical implications that Baxter sees as following from Newton's concept of vis inertiæ. Following this, I look at MacLaurin's commitment to the role of sense experience (...)
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  18.  3
    Colin R. Boylan, Douglas M. Hill, Andrew R. Wallace & Alan E. Wheeler (1992). Beyond Stereotypes. Science Education 76 (5):465-476.
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  19.  2
    Andrew Colin Gow (1999). Karl-Heinz Spiess, Familie und Verwandtschaft im deutschen Hochadel des Spätmittelalters: 13. bis Anfang des 16. Jahrhunderts.(Vierteljahrschrift für Sozial-und Wirtschaftsgeschichte, Beihefte, 111.) Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 1993. Paper. Pp. xiv, 627; tables and 54 black-and-white figures. DM 174. [REVIEW] Speculum 74 (3):840-841.
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  20.  1
    Andrew Colin Gow (2001). Sara Lipton, Images of Intolerance: The Representation of Jews and Judaism in the “Bible Moralisée.” Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 1999. Pp. Xvi, 241; 1 Diagram and 107 Black-and-White Figures. $60. [REVIEW] Speculum 76 (3):756-758.
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  21. Colin Gordon, Robert Castel, Jg Merquior, Paul Rabinow & Andrew Scull (1990). Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 3.
     
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  22. Andrew Colin Gow (1999). Robert Chazan, Medieval Stereotypes and Modern Antisemitism. Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 1997. Pp. Xiii, 189. $35. [REVIEW] Speculum 74 (3):718-720.
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  23. Andrew Lang & Marysa Demoor (1989). Friends Over the Ocean Andrew Lang's American Correspondents 1881-1912. Rijksuniversiteit Te Gent.
     
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  24. Colin Macduff, Andrew McKie, Sheelagh Martindale, Anne Marie Rennie, Bernice West & Sylvia Wilcock (2007). A Novel Framework for Reflecting on the Functioning of Research Ethics Review Panels. Nursing Ethics 14 (1):99-116.
    In the past decade structures and processes for the ethical review of UK health care research have undergone rapid change. Although this has focused users' attention on the functioning of review committees, it remains rare to read a substantive view from the inside. This article presents details of processes and findings resulting from a novel structured reflective exercise undertaken by a newly formed research ethics review panel in a university school of nursing and midwifery. By adopting and adapting some of (...)
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  25.  50
    Dennis Schulting (ed.) (forthcoming). Kantian Nonconceptualism. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This is a collection of essential essays on the topical debate on Kantian nonconceptualism, written by researchers at the cutting edge of Kant scholarship, most of whom have themselves been centrally involved in the debate, including Robert Hanna and Lucy Allais who, in the mid- to late noughties, spearheaded the debate on nonconceptual content in Kant. All the essays in the volume are original work and have never before been published. In this collection, the contributors engage with each other, and (...)
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  26. Thomas Spragens, Stephen Macedo, Joseph Hamburger, Colin Bird, Andrew Levine & Bert van den Brink (2003). Civic Liberalism. Political Theory 31 (1):125-135.
     
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  27.  32
    Andrew Botterell (2005). Review of Andrew Melnyk, A Physicalist Manifesto. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 114:125-128.
    A review of Andrew Melnyk, A Physicalist Manifesto: Thoroughly Modern Materialism (Cambridge University Press, 2003).
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  28.  31
    Colin McGinn (2008). Interview - Colin McGinn. The Philosophers' Magazine 40 (40):49-50.
    Colin McGinn has written on a wide range of philosophical issues and is best known for his argument that the human mind is incapable of understanding itself, and that therefore attempts to understand the nature of consciousness are doomed. He has written a novel and a memoir, and has recently turned his attention to the cinema and Shakespeare. He is professor of philosophy at Miami University.
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  29. Andrew Ashworth & Martin Wasik (eds.) (1998). Fundamentals of Sentencing Theory: Essays in Honour of Andrew von Hirsch. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The Oxford Monographs On Criminal Law And Justice series aims to cover all aspects of criminal law and procedure including criminal evidence. the scope of the series is wide, encompassing both practical and theoretical works. Series Editor: Professor Andrew Ashworth, Vinerian Professor of English Law, All Souls College, Oxford. This volume is a thematic collection of essays on sentencing theory by leading writers. The essays fall into three groups. Part I considers the underlying justifications for the imposition of (...)
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  30.  11
    Thomas Jeannot (2010). Reclaiming Marx's 'Capital': A Refutation of the Myth of Inconsistency, Andrew Kliman, Lanham: Lexington Books, 2007. Historical Materialism 18 (4):189-206.
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  31.  4
    Andrew Mansfield (2012). Aristocratic Reform and the Extirpation of Parliament in Early Georgian Britain: Andrew Michael Ramsay and French Ideas of Monarchy. History of European Ideas 40 (2):1-19.
    In An Essay upon Civil Government , Andrew Michael Ramsay mounted a sustained attack upon the development throughout English history of popular government. According to Ramsay, popular involvement in sovereignty had led to the decline of society and the revolutions of the seventeenth century. In his own time, Parliament had become a despotic instrument of government, riven with faction and driven by a multiplicity of laws that manifested a widespread corruption in the state. Ramsay's solution to this degeneracy (...)
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  32.  11
    Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, David Ingram, Sally Wyatt, Yoko Arisaka & Andrew Feenberg (2011). Book Symposium on Andrew Feenberg's Between Reason and Experience: Essays in Technology and Modernity. Philosophy and Technology 24 (2):203-226.
    Book Symposium on Andrew Feenberg’s Between Reason and Experience: Essays in Technology and Modernity Content Type Journal Article Pages 203-226 DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0017-8 Authors Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, Division of Medical Ethics, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA David B. Ingram, Loyola University Chicago, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL 60626, USA Sally Wyatt, e-Humanities Group, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) & Maastricht University, Cruquiusweg 31, 1019 AT Amsterdam, The Netherlands Yoko Arisaka, Forschungsinstitut für (...)
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  33.  41
    Andrew Collier, Margaret Scotford Archer & William Outhwaite (eds.) (2004). Defending Objectivity: Essays in Honour of Andrew Collier. Routledge.
    Andrew Collier is the boldest defender of objectivity - in science, knowledge, thought, action, politics, morality and religion. In this tribute and acknowledgement of the influence his work has had on a wide readership, his colleagues show that they have been stimulated by his thinking and offer challenging responses. This wide-ranging book covers key areas with which defenders of objectivity often have to engage. Sections are devoted to the following: 'objectivity of value', 'objectivity and everyday knowledge', 'objectivity in (...)
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  34. Tim Dalgleish (1993). The Guerilla Philosopher Colin Wilson and Existentialism.
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  35. W. H. Evans (1924). Twelve Lectures on the Harmonial Philosophy of Andrew Jackson Davis. Spiritualists' National Union.
     
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  36. Colin Heydt (ed.) (2010). Utilitarianism - Ed. Colin Heydt. Broadview Press.
    John Stuart Mill’s _Utilitarianism _is a philosophical defense of utilitarianism, a moral theory stating that right actions are those that tend to promote overall happiness. The essay first appeared as a series of articles published in _Fraser’s Magazine_ in 1861; the articles were collected and reprinted as a single book in 1863. Mill discusses utilitarianism in some of his other works, including _On Liberty_ and _The Subjection of Women_, but _Utilitarianism _contains his only sustained defence of the theory. In this (...)
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  37. Colin Heydt (ed.) (2010). Utilitarianism - Ed. Colin Heydt. Broadview Press.
    John Stuart Mill’s _Utilitarianism _is a philosophical defense of utilitarianism, a moral theory stating that right actions are those that tend to promote overall happiness. The essay first appeared as a series of articles published in _Fraser’s Magazine_ in 1861; the articles were collected and reprinted as a single book in 1863. Mill discusses utilitarianism in some of his other works, including _On Liberty_ and _The Subjection of Women_, but _Utilitarianism _contains his only sustained defence of the theory. In this (...)
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  38. Colin Heydt (ed.) (2010). Utilitarianism - Ed. Colin Heydt. Broadview Press.
    John Stuart Mill’s _Utilitarianism _is a philosophical defense of utilitarianism, a moral theory stating that right actions are those that tend to promote overall happiness. The essay first appeared as a series of articles published in _Fraser’s Magazine_ in 1861; the articles were collected and reprinted as a single book in 1863. Mill discusses utilitarianism in some of his other works, including _On Liberty_ and _The Subjection of Women_, but _Utilitarianism _contains his only sustained defence of the theory. In this (...)
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  39. John Shand & Gary Lachman (1996). Colin Wilson as Philosopher.
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  40. John Andrew Fisher (1996). The Myth of Anthropomorphism John Andrew Fisher. In Colin Allen & D. Jamison (eds.), Readings in Animal Cognition. MIT Press
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  41.  97
    Geoff Gallop (1983). Reviews : Andrew Gamble, Britain in Decline (Macmillan, 1981) and Martin Jacques and Francis Mulhern (Eds), The Forward March of Labour Halted? (Verso, 1981). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 7 (1):185-188.
    Andrew Gamble, Britain in Decline and Martin Jacques and Francis Mulhern , The Forward March of Labour Halted?
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  42. Tim Button (2013). Truth by Analysis: Games, Names, and Philosophy By Colin McGinn. [REVIEW] Analysis 73 (3):577-580.
    In Truth by Analysis (2012), Colin McGinn aims to breathe new life into conceptual analysis. Sadly, he fails to defend conceptual analysis, either in principle or by example.
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  43. Robert K. Garcia (2000). Minds Sans Miracles: Colin McGinn's Naturalized Mysterianism. Philosophia Christi 2 (2):227-242.
    In this paper, I discuss Colin McGinn’s claim that the mind is not miraculous but merely mysterious, and that this mystery is due to the limits of our cognitive faculties. To adequately present the flow and unity of McGinn’s overall argument, I offer an extended and uninterrupted précis of his case, followed by a critique. I will argue that McGinn’s argument is unsuccessful if it is intended to persuade non-naturalists, but nevertheless may be a plausible position for a naturalist, (...)
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  44.  20
    Wayne C. Myrvold (1996). Bayesianism and Diverse Evidence: A Reply to Andrew Wayne. Philosophy of Science 63 (4):661-665.
    Andrew Wayne discusses some recent attempts to account, within a Bayesian framework, for the "common methodological adage" that "diverse evidence better confirms a hypothesis than does the same amount of similar evidence". One of the approaches considered by Wayne is that suggested by Howson and Urbach and dubbed the "correlation approach" by Wayne. This approach is, indeed, incomplete, in that it neglects the role of the hypothesis under consideration in determining what diversity in a body of evidence is (...)
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  45.  47
    John Apczynski (2008). Andrew Grosso on Polanyi as a Resource for Christian Theology. Tradition and Discovery 35 (1):46-48.
    These reflections on Andrew Grosso’s recent book Personal Being highlight his philosophical construction of a concept of personhood based on themes from the writings Of Michael Polanyi and his use of this conception to express creatively elements of the traditional Christian doctrines on the trinity. Additional clarifications are sought regarding his formulations on the divine personhood of Jesus, the adequacy of his formulations on the intra-trinitarian relations, and the insightfulness of the absolute personhood of the divine. This study (...)
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  46.  2
    Andrew Eshleman (2010). Religious Fictionalism Defended: Reply to Cordry: Andrew Eshleman. Religious Studies 46 (1):91-96.
    In his paper, ‘A critique of religious fictionalism’, Benjamin Cordry raises a series of objections to a fictionalist form of religious non-realism that I proposed in my earlier paper, ‘Can an atheist believe in God?’. They fall into two main categories: those alleging that an atheist would be unjustified in adopting fictionalism, and those alleging that fictionalism could not be successfully implemented, or practised communally. I argue that these objections can be met.
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  47.  5
    William Hasker (2010). Which God? What Power? A Response to Andrew H. Gleeson. Sophia 49 (3):433-445.
    Andrew H. Gleeson has written an essay commenting on an exchange between Dewi Z. Phillips and me, arguing that I was mistaken to dismiss Phillips’ criticism of the standard definition of omnipotence as unsuccessful. Furthermore, he charges Swinburne, me, and analytic theists in general, with an excessive anthropomorphism that obliterates the distinction between Creator and creature. In response, I contend that all of Gleeson’s criticisms are unsound.
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  48.  8
    Beth Eddy (2015). Science, Democracy, and the American University: From the Civil War to the Cold War by Andrew Jewett. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 36 (2):194-198.
    Intellectual historian <span class='Hi'>Andrew</span> Jewett sets an enormous task for himself: to trace the history and context of science and values relations over the course of some hundred-odd years of U.S. history. He does this to further an argument that science was once explicitly connected to the study of human values, and that the story that explains how science became value neutral is a contingent one. It could have happened differently, he argues, and it should have. Furthermore, because that (...)
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  49. Andrew Cullison (2010). A Defence of the No-Minimum Response to the Problem of Evil: Andrew Cullison. Religious Studies 47 (1):121-123.
    I defend Peter van Inwagen's no-minimum response to the problem of evil from a recent objection raised by Jeff Jordan.
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  50.  8
    Richard Schaefer (2015). Andrew Dickson White and the History of a Religious Future. Zygon 50 (1):7-27.
    Andrew Dickson White played a pivotal role in constructing the image of a necessary, and even violent, confrontation between religion and science that persists to this day. Though scholars have long acknowledged that his position is more complex, given that White claimed to be saving religion from theology, there has been no attempt to explore what this means in light of his overwhelming attack on existing religions. This essay draws attention to how White's role as a historian was decisive (...)
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