Search results for 'Colleen Scanlon' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  16
    Colleen Scanlon (1997). Developing and Maintaining Ethical Competence. HEC Forum 9 (1):85-92.
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  2. R. Jay Wallace, Gerald Dworkin, John Deigh & Tm Scanlon (2002). TM Scanlon's What We Owe to Each Other. Ethics 112 (3):429-528.
     
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  3. Philip Pettit & T. M. Scanlon (2000). Two Construals of Scanlon's ContractualismWhat We Owe to Each Other. Journal of Philosophy 97 (3):148.
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  4. T. M. Scanlon (2000). I–T. M. Scanlon. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):301-317.
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  5. Thomas Scanlon (1998). What We Owe to Each Other. Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    In this book, T. M. Scanlon offers new answers to these questions, as they apply to the central part of morality that concerns what we owe to each other.
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  6.  71
    T. M. Scanlon, The Diversity of Objections to Inequality.
    This is the text of The Lindley Lecture for 1996, given by T.M. Scanlon, an American philosopher.
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  7. T. M. Scanlon (2014). Being Realistic About Reasons. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Is what we have reason to do a matter of fact? If so, what kind of truth is involved, how can we know it, and how do reasons motivate and explain action? In this concise and lucid book T. M. Scanlon offers answers, with a qualified defense of normative cognitivism--the view that there are normative truths about reasons for action.
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  8. T. M. Scanlon (2003). The Difficulty of Tolerance Essays in Political Philosophy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    These essays in political philosophy by T. M. Scanlon, written between 1969 and 1999, examine the standards by which social and political institutions should be justified and appraised. Scanlon explains how the powers of just institutions are limited by rights such as freedom of expression, and considers why these limits should be respected even when it seems that better results could be achieved by violating them. Other topics which are explored include voluntariness and consent, freedom of expression, tolerance, (...)
     
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  9.  85
    T. M. Scanlon (2000). Intention and Permissibility, I. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):301–317.
    [T. M. Scanlon] It is clearly impermissible to kill one person because his organs can be used to save five others who are in need of transplants. It has seemed to many that the explanation for this lies in the fact that in such cases we would be intending the death of the person whom we killed, or failed to save. What makes these actions impermissible, however, is not the agent's intention but rather the fact that the benefit envisaged (...)
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  10.  58
    T. M. Scanlon (2013). Responsibility and the Value of Choice. Think 12 (33):9-16.
    Research Articles T. M. Scanlon, Think, FirstView Article.
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  11.  15
    T. M. Scanlon (2013). Responsibility and the Value of Choice. Think 12 (33):9-16.
    Research Articles T. M. Scanlon, Think, FirstView Article.
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  12.  3
    John D. Caputo & Michael J. Scanlon (eds.) (1999). God, the Gift, and Postmodernism. Indiana University Press.
    Pushing past the constraints of postmodernism which cast "reason" and"religion" in opposition, God, the Gift, and Postmodernism, seizes the opportunity to question the authority of "the modern" and open the limits of possible experience, including the call to religious experience, as a new millennium approaches. Jacques Derrida, the father of deconstruction, engages with Jean-Luc Marion and other religious philosophers to entertain questions about intention, givenness, and possibility which reveal the extent to which deconstruction is structured like religion. New interpretations of (...)
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  13.  22
    Thomas Scanlon & Alex Voorhoeve (2001). Kant on the Cheap. The Philosophers' Magazine 16:29-30.
    A short interview with Thomas Scanlon about his contractualist moral theory. (Note: A revised and expanded version appears in Conversations on Ethics, OUP 2009).
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  14. T. M. Scanlon (2003). The Difficulty of Tolerance: Essays in Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    These essays in political philosophy by T. M. Scanlon, written between 1969 and 1999, examine the standards by which social and political institutions should be justified and appraised. Scanlon explains how the powers of just institutions are limited by rights such as freedom of expression, and considers why these limits should be respected even when it seems that better results could be achieved by violating them. Other topics which are explored include voluntariness and consent, freedom of expression, tolerance, (...)
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  15.  2
    John D. Caputo, Mark Dooley & Michael J. Scanlon (eds.) (2001). Questioning God. Indiana University Press.
    In 15 insightful essays, Jacques Derrida and an international group of scholars of religion explore postmodern thinking about God and consider the nature of forgiveness in relation to the paradoxes of the gift. Among the themes addressed by contributors are the possibilities of imagining God as unthinkable, imagining God as non-patriarchal, imagining a return to Augustine, and imagining an age in which praise is far more important than narrative. Questioning God moves readers beyond the parameters of metaphysical reason and modernist (...)
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  16.  1
    John D. Caputo & Michael J. Scanlon (eds.) (1999). God, the Gift, and Postmodernism. Indiana University Press.
    Pushing past the constraints of postmodernism which cast "reason" and"religion" in opposition, God, the Gift, and Postmodernism, seizes the opportunity to question the authority of "the modern" and open the limits of possible experience, including the call to religious experience, as a new millennium approaches. Jacques Derrida, the father of deconstruction, engages with Jean-Luc Marion and other religious philosophers to entertain questions about intention, givenness, and possibility which reveal the extent to which deconstruction is structured like religion. New interpretations of (...)
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  17.  2
    John D. Caputo & Michael J. Scanlon (eds.) (2005). Augustine and Postmodernism: Confessions and Circumfession. Indiana University Press.
    At the heart of the current surge of interest in religion among contemporary Continental philosophers stands Augustine’s Confessions. With Derrida’s Circumfession constantly in the background, this volume takes up the provocative readings of Augustine by Heidegger, Lyotard, Arendt, and Ricoeur. Derrida himself presides over and comments on essays by major Continental philosophers and internationally recognized Augustine scholars. While studies on and about Augustine as a philosopher abound, none approach his work from such a uniquely postmodern point of view, showing both (...)
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  18. John D. Caputo & Michael J. Scanlon (eds.) (2005). Augustine and Postmodernism: Confessions and Circumfession. Indiana University Press.
    At the heart of the current surge of interest in religion among contemporary Continental philosophers stands Augustine’s Confessions. With Derrida’s Circumfession constantly in the background, this volume takes up the provocative readings of Augustine by Heidegger, Lyotard, Arendt, and Ricoeur. Derrida himself presides over and comments on essays by major Continental philosophers and internationally recognized Augustine scholars. While studies on and about Augustine as a philosopher abound, none approach his work from such a uniquely postmodern point of view, showing both (...)
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  19. John D. Caputo & Michael J. Scanlon (eds.) (2005). Augustine and Postmodernism: Confessions and Circumfession. Indiana University Press.
    At the heart of the current surge of interest in religion among contemporary Continental philosophers stands Augustine’s Confessions. With Derrida’s Circumfession constantly in the background, this volume takes up the provocative readings of Augustine by Heidegger, Lyotard, Arendt, and Ricoeur. Derrida himself presides over and comments on essays by major Continental philosophers and internationally recognized Augustine scholars. While studies on and about Augustine as a philosopher abound, none approach his work from such a uniquely postmodern point of view, showing both (...)
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  20. T. M. Scanlon (2009). The Difficulty of Tolerance: Essays in Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    These essays in political philosophy by T. M. Scanlon, written between 1969 and 1999, examine the standards by which social and political institutions should be justified and appraised. Scanlon explains how the powers of just institutions are limited by rights such as freedom of expression, and considers why these limits should be respected even when it seems that better results could be achieved by violating them. Other topics which are explored include voluntariness and consent, freedom of expression, tolerance, (...)
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  21. Thomas Scanlon (2008). Moral Dimensions: Permissibility, Meaning, Blame. Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    The illusory appeal of double effect -- The significance of intent -- Means and ends -- Blame.
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  22.  49
    T. M. Scanlon (2014). Being Realistic About Reasons. Oxford University Press.
    It is often claimed that irreducibly normative truths would have unacceptable metaphysical implications, and are incompatible with a scientific view of the world. The book argues, on the basis of a general account of the relevance of ontological questions, that this claim is mistaken. It is also a mistake to think that interpreting normative judgments as beliefs would make it impossible to explain their connection with action. An agent’s acceptance of a normative judgment can explain that agent’s subsequent action because (...)
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  23. Thomas M. Scanlon (2013). Giving Desert its Due. Philosophical Explorations 16 (2):1-16.
  24. Thomas Scanlon (2007). Structural Irrationality. In Geoffrey Brennan, Robert Goodin, Frank Jackson & Michael Smith (eds.), Common Minds: Themes From the Philosophy of Philip Pettit. Clarendon Press
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  25. T. M. Scanlon (2010). Metaphysics and Morals. In Mario de Caro & David Macarthur (eds.), Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association. Columbia University Press 7 - 22.
    This essay argues that normative judgments, in general, and moral judgments, in particular, are "truth apt" and can be objects of belief. Other main claims are: judgments about reasons, if interpreted as true, do not have metaphysical implications that are incompatible with a scientific view of the world. Two kinds of normative claims should be distinguished: substantive claims about what reasons people have and structural claims about what attitudes people must have insofar as they are rational. Employing this distinction, the (...)
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  26. Thomas Scanlon (1972). A Theory of Freedom of Expression. Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (2):204-226.
    The JSTOR Archive is a trusted digital repository providing for long-term preservation and access to leading academic journals and scholarly literature from around the world. The Archive is supported by libraries, scholarly societies, publishers, and foundations. It is an initiative of JSTOR, a not-for-profit organization with a mission to help the scholarly community take advantage of advances in technology. For more information regarding JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.
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  27. T. M. Scanlon (1975). Preference and Urgency. Journal of Philosophy 72 (19):655-669.
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  28.  70
    Thomas M. Scanlon (1982). Contractualism and Utilitarianism. In Amartya Kumar Sen & Bernard Arthur Owen Williams (eds.), Utilitarianism and Beyond. Cambridge University Press 103--110.
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  29.  53
    T. M. Scanlon (2003). 3 Rawls on Justification. In Samuel Richard Freeman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Rawls. Cambridge University Press 139.
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  30. T. M. Scanlon (2008). Index. In Moral Dimensions: Permissibility, Meaning, Blame. Harvard University Press 243-247.
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  31. T. M. Scanlon (2011). The Unity of the Normative. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 154 (3):443-450.
    From the issue entitled "With Book Symposium on Judith Thomson's Normativity".
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  32. Thomas Scanlon (1976). Nozick on Rights, Liberty, and Property. Philosophy and Public Affairs 6 (1):3-25.
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  33.  3
    Thomas Scanlon (2016). Individual Morality and the Morality of Institutions. Filozofija I Društvo 27 (1):3-36.
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  34. Thomas Scanlon (1990). Promises and Practices. Philosophy and Public Affairs 19 (3):199-226.
  35. T. M. Scanlon (2002). Reasons, Responsibility, and Reliance: Replies to Wallace, Dworkin, and Deigh. Ethics 112 (3):507-528.
  36. T. M. Scanlon (1977). Rights, Goals, and Fairness. Erkenntnis 11 (1):81 - 95.
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  37. Anand Pillay & Thomas Scanlon (2002). Compact Complex Manifolds with the DOP and Other Properties. Journal of Symbolic Logic 67 (2):737-743.
    We point out that a certain complex compact manifold constructed by Lieberman has the dimensional order property, and has U-rank different from Morley rank. We also give a sufficient condition for a Kahler manifold to be totally degenerate (that is, to be an indiscernible set, in its canonical language) and point out that there are K3 surfaces which satisfy these conditions.
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  38.  41
    T. M. Scanlon (2007). Wrongness and Reasons: A Re-Examination. In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics. Clarendon Press
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  39. Lawrence E. Scanlon & D. W. Gotshalk (1960). Letters Pro and Con. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 19 (1):99-100.
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  40.  95
    T. M. Scanlon (2003). Replies. Ratio 16 (4):424–439.
  41.  2
    Rachel Vreeman, Eunice Kamaara, Allan Kamanda, David Ayuku, Winstone Nyandiko, Lukoye Atwoli, Samuel Ayaya, Peter Gisore, Michael Scanlon & Paula Braitstein (2012). A Qualitative Study Using Traditional Community Assemblies to Investigate Community Perspectives on Informed Consent and Research Participation in Western Kenya. BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):23-.
    Background International collaborators face challenges in the design and implementation of ethical biomedical research. Evaluating community understanding of research and processes like informed consent may enable researchers to better protect research participants in a particular setting; however, there exist few studies examining community perspectives in health research, particularly in resource-limited settings, or strategies for engaging the community in research processes. Our goal was to inform ethical research practice in a biomedical research setting in western Kenya and similar resource-limited settings. Methods (...)
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  42.  95
    T. M. Scanlon (2012). Justification and Legitimation: Comments on Sebastiano Maffettone's Rawls: An Introduction. Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (9):887-892.
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  43. T. M. Scanlon (1973). The Consistency of Number Theory Via Herbrand's Theorem. Journal of Symbolic Logic 38 (1):29-58.
  44. T. M. Scanlon (1988). The Significance of Choice. In Sterling M. McMurrin (ed.), The Tanner Lectures on Human Values (Vol. 8, pp. 149-216). University of Utah Press
     
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  45.  73
    T. M. Scanlon (2003). Thickness and Theory. Journal of Philosophy 100 (6):275 - 287.
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  46. T. M. Scanlon (2003). Précis of What We Owe to Each Other. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (1):159–161.
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  47. Ronald Dworkin, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, John Rawls & Thomas Scanlon (1997). The Case for Legalised Euthanasia. The Philosophers' Magazine 1 (1):26-31.
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  48.  37
    T. M. Scanlon (2013). Reply to Zofia Stemplowska. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):508-514.
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  49.  97
    T. M. Scanlon (2001). Symposium on Amartya Sen's Philosophy: 3 Sen and Consequentialism. Economics and Philosophy 17 (1):39-50.
    It is a particular pleasure to be able to participate in this symposium in honor of Amartya Sen. We agree on a wide range of topics, but I will focus here on an area of relative disagreement. Sen is much more attracted to consequentialism than I am, and the main topic of my paper will be the particular version of consequentialism that he has articulated and the reasons why he is drawn to this view.
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  50. T. M. Scanlon (2011). Précis of Moral Dimensions: Permissibility, Meaning, Blame. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 83 (2):459-463.
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