PhilPapers is currently in read-only mode while we are performing some maintenance. You can use the site normally except that you cannot sign in. This shouldn't last long.

Search results for 'Commitment of Mentally Ill' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Amelie Perron, Trudy Rudge & Dave Holmes (2010). Citizen Minds, Citizen Bodies: The Citizenship Experience and the Government of Mentally Ill Persons. Nursing Philosophy 11 (2):100-111.score: 118.3
    The concept of citizenship is becoming more and more prominent in specific fields, such as psychiatry/mental health, where it is constituted as a solution to the issues of exclusion, discrimination, and poverty often endured by the mentally ill. We argue that such discourse of citizenship represents a break in the history of psychiatry and constitutes a powerful strategy to counter the effects of equally powerful psychiatric labelling. However, we call into question the emancipatory promise of a citizenship agenda. Foucault's (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. R. D. Strous (2009). To Protect or to Publish: Confidentiality and the Fate of the Mentally Ill Victims of Nazi Euthanasia. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (6):361-364.score: 117.8
    In Nazi Germany, approximately 200 000 mentally ill people were murdered under the guise of euthanasia. Relatively little is known regarding the fate of the Jewish mentally ill patients targeted in this process, long before the Holocaust officially began. For the Nazis, Jewish mentally ill patients were doubly cursed since they embodied both “precarious genes” and “racial toxin”. To preserve the memory of the victims, Yad Vashem, the leading institution dedicated to documentation of the Holocaust, actively collects (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Joseph D. Bloom (2010). “The Incarceration Revolution”1: The Abandonment of the Seriously Mentally Ill to Our Jails and Prisons. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):727-734.score: 117.0
    It is well known that today jails and prisons house many seriously mentally ill citizens who in prior decades have been treated in mental hospitals and community mental health programs. This paper begins with a brief review of the history of support for mental health programs at the federal level and then, using the State of Oregon as an example, describes the new state era of mental health services which is characterized by the increasing use of the criminal justice (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Michael Cholbi (2009). Tonkens on the Irrationality of the Suicidally Mentally Ill. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):102-106.score: 117.0
    abstract Ryan Tonkens proposes that my Kantian approach to suicide intervention with respect to the mentally ill (2002) wrongly assumes that the suicidally mentally ill are rational and are therefore rational agents to whom Kantian moral constraints ought to apply. Here I indicate how the empirical evidence concerning the suicidally mentally ill does not support Tonkens' criticism that the suicidally mentally ill are irrational. In particular, that evidence does not support the conclusion that such individuals are (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. S. Pattison & P. Armitage (1986). An Ethical Analysis of the Policies of British Community and Hospital Care for Mentally Ill People. Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (3):136-142.score: 117.0
    Scant consideration has been given to the ethical implications of the policy of closing down psychiatric hospitals in favour of community care. The recent adherents of this policy in government have been enthusiastic in encouraging its implementation. This paper has three sections: a brief resumé of the history and principles of community care for the mentally ill; a discussion on the merits and de-merits of psychiatric care in the hospital and in the community; and an outline of some preliminary (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Thomas W. Kallert, Juan E. Mezzich & John Monahan (eds.) (2011). Coercive Treatment in Psychiatry: Clinical, Legal and Ethical Aspects. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 105.0
    This book considers coercion within the healing and ethical framework of therapeutic relationships and partnerships at all levels, and addresses the universal ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. L. Fields (1987). Exoneration of the Mentally Ill. Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (4):201-205.score: 100.3
    Mental illness may be manifested in the impairment of understanding or of volitional control. Impairment of understanding may be manifested in delusions. Impairment of volitional control is shown when a person is unable to act in accordance with good reasons that he himself accepts. In order for an impairment of understanding or of self-control to exculpate, the offence must be causally connected with the impairment in question. The rationale of exculpation in general, which applies also to the case of mental (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Mayelin Prieto-Gonzalez (2003). Supreme Court Limits Permissible Scope of Government's Ability to Force Medication of Mentally Ill Defendants. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):737-739.score: 90.8
  9. James B. Brady (1997). Carl Elliott, the Rules of Insanity: Moral Responsibility and the Mentally Ill. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 31 (4):579-581.score: 88.5
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Nathaniel Laor (1984). The Paradox of Autonomy: The Case of the Mentally Ill. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 18 (2):159-166.score: 88.5
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Guido R. Zanni & Paul F. Stavis (2007). The Effectiveness and Ethical Justification of Psychiatric Outpatient Commitment. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (11):31 – 41.score: 88.5
    Studies link involuntary outpatient commitment with improved patient outcomes, fueling debate on its ethical justification. This study compares inpatient utilization for committed outpatients in the 1990s with those who were not under outpatient civil commitment orders. Findings reveal committed outpatients had higher utilization of inpatient services and restraint episodes prior to their commitment compared with a control group. Committed outpatients also were more likely to have been on discharge status at the time of admission, have been admitted (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. R. S. Downie (1997). The Rules of Insanity: Moral Responsibility and the Mentally Ill Offender. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):196-197.score: 88.5
  13. Nathaniel Laor (1984). The Autonomy of the Mentally Ill: A Case-Study in Individualistic Ethics. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 14 (3):331-349.score: 88.5
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. P. G. Campbell (1986). An Ethical Analysis of the Policies of British Community and Hospital Care for Mentally Ill People: A Commentary. Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (3):141-142.score: 88.5
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. A. McCall-Smith (1987). Exoneration of the Mentally Ill. Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (4):206-208.score: 88.5
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. K. Usher & C. Holmes (1997). Ethical Aspects of Phenomenological Research with Mentally Ill People. Nursing Ethics 4 (1):49-56.score: 88.5
    Given the dramatic rise in the frequency of nursing research that involves eliciting personal information, one would expect that attempts to maintain the balance between the aspirations of researchers and the needs and rights of patients would lead to extensive discussion of the ethical issues arising. However, they have received little attention in the literature. This paper outlines and discusses some of the issues associated with qualitative research. The discussion converges on the specific case of phenomenological research, which involves the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. V. L. Byer, E. G. DeRenzo & E. J. Matricardi (1992). Case 1: Rational Suicide or Involuntary Commitment of a Patient Who is Terminally Ill. Journal of Clinical Ethics 4 (4):327-328.score: 88.5
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Andrew Pessin (1994). The New Schizophrenia: Diagnosis and Dynamics of the Homeless Mentally Ill. Journal of Mind and Behavior 15 (3):199-222.score: 88.5
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Theda Rehbock (2013). How to Respect the Will of Mentally Ill Persons? Studia Philosophica Estonica 6 (2):22-37.score: 87.8
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Dan W. Brock (1993). A Proposal for the Use of Advance Directives in the Treatment of Incompetent Mentally Ill Persons. Bioethics 7 (2-3):247-256.score: 85.5
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Frank Kortmann (1998). Elliott, C.: 1996, The Rules of Insanity; Moral Responsibility and the Mentally Ill Offender. [REVIEW] Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (2):178-179.score: 85.5
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Aaron E. Hinkley (2013). From the End-of-Life to the Possibility of Nonvoluntary Euthanasia of the Mentally Ill: Bioethics in a Broken Culture. Christian Bioethics 19 (1):1-6.score: 85.5
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Dan W. Brock (1998). Commentary on" The Time Frame of Preferences, Dispositions, and the Validity of Advance Directives for the Mentally Ill". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (3):251-253.score: 85.5
  24. Sally Burgess (1998). Commentary on" The Time Frame of Preferences, Dispositions, and the Validity of Advance Directives for the Mentally Ill". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (3):255-258.score: 85.5
  25. Julian Savulescu & Donna Dickenson (1998). The Time Frame of Preferences, Dispositions, and the Validity of Advance Directives for the Mentally Ill. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (3):225-246.score: 85.5
  26. Rebecca Dresser (1998). Commentary on" The Time Frame of Preferences, Dispositions, and the Validity of Advance Directives for the Mentally Ill". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (3):247-249.score: 85.5
  27. Nigel Lg Eastman (1998). Commentary on" The Time Frame of Preferences, Dispositions, and the Validity of Advance Directives for the Mentally Ill". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (3):259-261.score: 85.5
  28. Norman Quist (1984). The Right to Refuse Psychotropic Drugs, by N. Rhoden; a Common Law Remedy for Forcible Medication of the Institutionalized Mentally Ill (Note), by J. Bioethics Reporter 1 (1):262.score: 85.5
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Marga Reimer (2010). Childhood Trauma and the Mentally Ill Parent: Reconciling Moral and Medical Conceptions of" What Really Happened". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (3):265-267.score: 85.5
  30. Belinda Schwehr (1998). Resource Allocation for the Mentally Ill: A Question of Law and Politics. Health Care Analysis 6 (3):233-236.score: 85.5
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Churn-Jung Liau (2001). A Logical Analysis of the Relationship Between Commitment and Obligation. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 10 (2):237-261.score: 80.0
    In this paper, we analyze the relationship between commitment and obligation from a logical viewpoint. The principle of commitment implying obligation is proven in a specific logic of action preference which is a generalization of Meyer's dynamic deontic logic. In the proposed formalism, an agent's commitment to goals is considered as a special kind of action which can change one's deontic preference andone's obligation to take some action is based on the preference and the effects of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Steven R. Smith (2012). Neuroscience, Ethics and Legal Responsibility: The Problem of the Insanity Defense. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):475-481.score: 77.8
    The insanity defense presents many difficult questions for the legal system. It attracts attention beyond its practical significance (it is seldom used successfully) because it goes to the heart of the concept of legal responsibility. “Not guilty by reason of insanity” generally requires that as a result of mental illness the defendant was unable to distinguish right from wrong at the time of the crime. The many difficult and complex questions presented by the insanity defense have led some in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Randy K. Chiu (2003). Income, Money Ethic, Pay Satisfaction, Commitment, and Unethical Behavior: Is the Love of Money the Root of Evil for Hong Kong Employees? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 46 (1):13 - 30.score: 75.0
    This study examines a model involving income, the love of money, pay satisfaction, organizational commitment, job changes, and unethical behavior among 211 full-time employees in Hong Kong, China. Direct paths suggested that the love of money was related to unethical behavior, but income (money) was not. Indirect paths showed that income was negatively related to the love of money that, in turn, was negatively related to pay satisfaction that, in turn, was negatively associated with unethical behavior. Pay satisfaction was (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Sarah Steenhaut & Patrick Van Kenhove (2005). Relationship Commitment and Ethical Consumer Behavior in a Retail Setting: The Case of Receiving Too Much Change at the Checkout. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 56 (4):335 - 353.score: 75.0
    In this study, we conducted two experiments to examine the effect of relationship commitment on the reaction of shoppers to receiving too much change, controlling for the amount of excess change. Hypotheses based on equity theory, opportunism and guilt were set up and tested. The first study showed that, when the less committed consumer is confronted with a large excess of change, he/she is less likely to report this mistake, compared with a small excess. Conversely, consumers with a high (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Marc Street & Vera L. Street (2006). The Effects of Escalating Commitment on Ethical Decision-Making. Journal of Business Ethics 64 (4):343 - 356.score: 75.0
    Although scholars have invoked the escalation framework as a means of explaining the occurrence of numerous organizationally undesirable behaviors on the part of decision makers, to date no empirical research on the potential influences of escalating commitment on the likelihood of unethical behavior at the individual level of analysis has been reported in either the escalation or the ethical decision-making literatures. Thus, the main purpose of this project is to provide a theoretical foundation and empirical support for the contention (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Lada V. Kurpis, Mirjeta S. Beqiri & James G. Helgeson (2008). The Effects of Commitment to Moral Self-Improvement and Religiosity on Ethics of Business Students. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (3):447 - 463.score: 75.0
    Using survey methodology we examined the relationships between commitment to moral self-improvement (CMSI), religiosity, ethical problem recognition, and behavioral intentions in a sample of 242 business students. Results of the study suggest that CMSI predicts ethical problem recognition and behavioral intentions. Our findings also suggest that CMSI is positively related to religiosity. The study provides some evidence of CMSI being a mediator in the influence of religiosity on ethical problem recognition and behavioral intentions. Compared to religiosity, CMSI turned out (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Chun-Hsi Vivian Chen & Setyabudi Indartono (2011). Study of Commitment Antecedents: The Dynamic Point of View. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (4):529-541.score: 75.0
    This study adopted a dynamic perspective in investigating the effects of employees’ perception of equity (PoE) and perception of organizational politics (POP) on their trust in organizations and the subsequent effect of such on their commitment. Data were collected from 216 employees from various industries. The positive effect of PoE and negative effect of POP on employees’ trust were confirmed in this study. It is also found that employees’ trust in organizations has a positive effect on their organizational (...). This study also confirmed the mediation of employees’ trust on the relationships between POP, PoE, and organizational commitment. Besides, the moderation of employees’ trust on the relationships between POP, PoE, and organizational commitment was not confirmed. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed. (shrink)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Matthias Fink, Rainer Harms & Isabella Hatak (2012). Nanotechnology and Ethics: The Role of Regulation Versus Self-Commitment in Shaping Researchers' Behavior. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):569-581.score: 75.0
    The governance of nanotechnology seeks to limit its risks, without constraining opportunities. The literature on the effectiveness of approaches to governance has neglected approaches that impact directly on the behavior of a researcher. We analyze the effectiveness of legal regulations versus regulation via self-commitment. Then, we refine this model by analyzing competition and autonomy as key contingency factors. In the first step, qualitative interviews with nanotechnology researchers are conducted to reflect this model. In the second step, its empirical relevance (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Takuma Kimura (2013). The Moderating Effects of Political Skill and Leader–Member Exchange on the Relationship Between Organizational Politics and Affective Commitment. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (3):587-599.score: 75.0
    Previous empirical studies have shown that perceptions of organizational politics are negatively related to individuals’ affective commitment. The key contribution of this study was that it found the interactive moderating effects of political skill and quality of leader–member exchange (LMX) on the relationship between perceptions of organizational politics and affective commitment. Our results indicated that politics perception affective commitment relationship was weaker when both political skill and quality of LMX are high. When only political skill is high (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Andrada Parvu, Gabriel Roman, Silvia Dumitras, Rodica Gramma, Mariana Enache, Stefana Maria Moisa, Radu Chirita, Catalin Iov & Beatrice Ioan (2012). Arguments in Favor of a Religious Coping Pattern in Terminally Ill Patients. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (31):88-112.score: 75.0
    A patient suffering from a severe illness that is entering its terminal stage is forced to develop a coping process. Of all the coping patterns, the religious one stands out as being a psychological resource available to all patients regardless of culture, learning, and any age. Religious coping interacts with other values or practices of society, for example the model of a society that takes care of it's elder members among family or in an institutionalized environment or the way the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Arménio Rego, Susana Leal, Miguel P. Cunha, Jorge Faria & Carlos Pinho (2010). How the Perceptions of Five Dimensions of Corporate Citizenship and Their Inter-Inconsistencies Predict Affective Commitment. Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):107 - 127.score: 75.0
    Through a convenience sample of 260 employees, the study shows how employees' perceptions about corporate citizenship (CC) predict their affective commitment. The study was carried out in Portugal, a high in-group and low societal collectivistic culture. Maignan et al.' s (1999 Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science 27(4), 455-469) construct, including economic, legal, ethical, and discretionary responsibilities was used. The main findings are: (a) contrary to what has been presumed in the literature, the discretionary dimension includes two factors: (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Hanfried Helmchen (2013). Different Conceptions of Mental Illness: Consequences for the Association with Patients†. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 72.8
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. David M. Godden (2010). The Importance of Belief in Argumentation: Belief, Commitment and the Effective Resolution of a Difference of Opinion. [REVIEW] Synthese 172 (3):397 - 414.score: 72.0
    This paper examines the adequacy of commitment change, as a measure of the successful resolution of a difference of opinion. I argue that differences of opinion are only effectively resolved if commitments undertaken in argumentation survive beyond its conclusion and go on to govern an arguer’s actions in everyday life, e.g., by serving as premises in her practical reasoning. Yet this occurs, I maintain, only when an arguer’s beliefs are changed, not merely her commitments.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Robert Ricco & Anthony Sierra (2011). Individual Differences in the Interpretation of Commitment in Argumentation. Argumentation 25 (1):37-61.score: 72.0
    The present study explored several dispositional factors associated with individual differences in lay adult’s interpretation of when an arguer is, or is not, committed to a statement. College students were presented with several two-person arguments in which the proponent of a thesis conceded a key point in the last turn. Participants were then asked to indicate the extent to which that concession implied a change in the proponent’s attitude toward any of the previous statements in the argument. Participants designated as (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Bruce A. Arrigo (2011). The Ethics of Total Confinement: A Critique of Madness, Citizenship, and Social Justice. Oxford University Press.score: 69.0
    In three parts, this volume in the AP-LS series explores the phenomena of captivity and risk management, guided and informed by the theory, method, and policy ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Angela K. Thachuk (2011). Stigma and the Politics of Biomedical Models of Mental Illness. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (1):140-163.score: 66.8
    The word stigma comes from ancient Greece, and was initially used in reference to signs or symbols physically cut into or burned onto the bodies of those deemed to be of an inferior status. It was a marking of one's tarnished and flawed character. Today, stigma is more often attached to one's social standing, personality traits, or psychological makeup. "People are no longer physically branded; instead they are societally labeled—as poor, as criminal, homosexual, mentally ill, and so on. These (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Amresh Shrivastava, Megan Johnston & Yves Bureau (2012). Stigma of Mental Illness-1: Clinical Reflections. Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):70.score: 63.8
    Although the quality and effectiveness of mental health treatments and services have improved greatly over the past 50 years, therapeutic revolutions in psychiatry have not yet been able to reduce stigma. Stigma is a risk factor leading to negative mental health outcomes. It is responsible for treatment seeking delays and reduces the likelihood that a mentally ill patient will receive adequate care. It is evident that delay due to stigma can have devastating consequences. This review will discuss the causes (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Weihui Fu, Satish P. Deshpande & Xiao Zhao (2011). The Impact of Ethical Behavior and Facets of Job Satisfaction on Organizational Commitment of Chinese Employees. Journal of Business Ethics 104 (4):537-543.score: 63.0
    This study examines factors impacting organizational commitment of 214 employees working at a Chinese state-owned steel company. Ethical behavior of peers and ethical behavior of successful managers had a significant impact on organizational commitment. The four facets of job satisfaction (pay, coworker, supervision, and work itself) had a significant impact on organizational commitment. Respondent’s age also significantly impacted organizational commitment. Perceptions of ethical behavior of successful managers, satisfaction with work, and gender were significantly correlated with social (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Manuel Carlos Vallejo (2009). The Effects of Commitment of Non-Family Employees of Family Firms From the Perspective of Stewardship Theory. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):379 - 390.score: 63.0
    Although commitment is one of the attributes of family firms of continuing interest to researchers, they almost always study it from the perspective of the owning family. In the current work, we analyze the commitment of the non-family employees. We propose a model of commitment, with the aim of studying the implications that this variable may have for family businesses. We study both the aspects on the basis of the approaches of Meyer and Allen's three-component model of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. J. Lascaratos, E. Poulakou-Rebelakou & S. Marketos (1999). Abandonment of Terminally Ill Patients in the Byzantine Era. An Ancient Tradition? Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (3):254-258.score: 62.0
    Our research on the texts of the Byzantine historians and chroniclers revealed an apparently curious phenomenon, namely, the abandonment of terminally ill emperors by their physicians when the latter realised that they could not offer any further treatment. This attitude tallies with the mentality of the ancient Greek physicians, who even in Hippocratic times thought the treatment and care of the terminally ill to be a challenge to nature and hubris to the gods. Nevertheless, it is a very curious attitude (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000