Search results for 'Committe for Human Rights' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Committe for Human Rights & American Anthropological Association (2009). Declaration on Anthropology and Human Rights (1999). In Mark Goodale (ed.), Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Wiley-Blackwell
     
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  2.  7
    Karen Mizell (2015). Philosophy for Children, Community of INquiry, and Human Rights Education. Childhood and Philosophy 11 (22):319-328.
    The Community of Inquiry is a unique discourse model that brings adults and children together in collaborative discussions of philosophical and ethical topics. This paper examines the potential for COI to deepen children’s moral and intellectual understanding through recursive discourse that encourages them to transcend cultural limitations, confront their own moral predispositions, and increase inter-cultural understanding. As children become familiar with normative values couched in ethical dialogue, they are immersed in ideals of reciprocity and empathy. Such dialogues can become effective (...)
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  3.  7
    Debra Budiani-Saberi & Seán Columb (forthcoming). A Human Rights Approach to Human Trafficking for Organ Removal. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-18.
    Human trafficking for organ removal (HTOR) should not be reduced to a problem of supply and demand of organs for transplantation, a problem of organized crime and criminal justice, or a problem of voiceless, abandoned victims. Rather, HTOR is at once an egregious human rights abuse and a form of human trafficking. As such, it demands a human-rights based approach in analysis and response to this problem, placing the victim at the center of initiatives (...)
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  4.  4
    Sidney Tarrow (2010). Outsiders Inside and Insiders Outside: Linking Transnational and Domestic Public Action for Human Rights. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 11 (2):171-182.
    “Is the traditional divide between domestic and international politics breaking down?” and, if so, with what effects on transnational human rights activism? This paper argues that small and focused transnational campaigns can have dramatic short-term results that its large-scale and bureaucratic cousins are too slow-moving to effect; it illustrates the importance of often-fleeting political opportunities in opening windows for non-state public action; and using four different transnational campaigns, it shows how loosely coupled mechanisms and processes link domestic and (...)
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  5.  73
    S. Matthew Liao (forthcoming). Human Rights as Fundamental Conditions for a Good Life. In Rowan Cruft, S. Matthew Liao & Massimo Renzo (eds.), The Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights. Oxford University Press
    What grounds human rights? How do we determine that something is a genuine human right? In this paper, I offer a new answer: human beings have human rights to what I call the fundamental conditions for pursuing a good life. These are certain goods, capacities and options that human beings qua human beings need whatever else they (qua individuals) might need in order to pursue a characteristically good human life. I call (...)
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  6.  10
    Ivar Kolstad (2009). Human Rights and Assigned Duties: Implications for Corporations. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 10 (4):569-582.
    Human rights imply duties. The question is, duties for whom? Without a well-defined scheme for assigning duties correlative to human rights, these rights remain illusory. This paper develops core elements of a general scheme of duty assignment and studies the implications for corporations. A key distinction in such an assignment is between unconditional and conditional duties. Unconditional duties apply to every agent regardless of the conduct of others. Conditional duties reflect a division of moral labour (...)
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  7.  11
    Alisa Clarke (2012). The Potential of the Human Rights-Based Approach for the Evolution of the United Nations as a System. Human Rights Review 13 (2):225-248.
    The United Nations (UN), facing increasingly intense challenges in the fulfillment of its mission, also harbors the potential for enhanced effectiveness, relevance, and legitimacy in the form of the human rights-based approach. The human rights-based approach (HRBA) is one model for translating the organization’s values into a more adaptive, inclusive, dynamic, and responsive system of processes and outcomes. In the arena of politics, its meeting with a meaningful degree of receptiveness could signal a growing acceptance of (...)
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  8.  1
    David L. Richards & K. Chad Clay (2012). An Umbrella With Holes: Respect for Non-Derogable Human Rights During Declared States of Emergency, 1996–2004. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 13 (4):443-471.
    This paper examines the effects of non-derogability status for seven human rights during declared states of emergency from 1996 to 2004 in 195 countries. For this purpose, we create several original measures of countries’ state of emergency status. Our analysis finds the intended protections from the special legal status of non-derogable rights to be anemic, at best, during declared emergencies. This finding begs a reconsideration of both the utility of the “non-derogable” categorization in both international and municipal (...)
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  9. Joe Hoover (2013). Towards a Politics for Human Rights: Ambiguous Humanity and Democratizing Rights. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (9):0191453713498390.
    Human rights are a suspect project – this seems the only sensible starting point today. This suspicion, however, is not absolute and the desire to preserve and reform human rights persists for many of us. The most important contemporary critiques of human rights focus on the problematic consequences of the desire for universal rights. Some defenders of human rights accept elements of this critique in their reformulations, but opponents remain wary of (...)
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  10.  14
    Edmund F. Byrne (2011). Business Ethics Should Study Illicit Businesses: To Advance Respect for Human Rights. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (4):497-509.
    Business ethics should include illicit businesses as targets of investigation. For, though such businesses violate human rights they have been largely ignored by business ethicists. It is time to surmount this indifference in view of recent international efforts to define illicit businesses for regulatory purposes. Standing in the way, however, is a meta-ethical question as to whether any business can be declared unqualifiedly immoral. In support of an affirmative answer I address a number of counter-indications by comparing approaches (...)
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  11.  12
    Nadia Bernaz (2013). Enhancing Corporate Accountability for Human Rights Violations: Is Extraterritoriality the Magic Potion? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):493-511.
    The United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, resulting from the work of John Ruggie and his team, largely depend on state action and corporate good will for their implementation. One increasingly popular way for states to prevent and redress violations of human rights committed by companies outside their country of registration is to adopt measures with extraterritorial implications, some of which are presented in the article, or to assert direct extraterritorial jurisdiction in specific (...)
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  12.  6
    Pragna Patel (2008). Faith in the State? Asian Women's Struggles for Human Rights in the U.K. Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):9-36.
    The discourse of multiculturalism provides a useful means of understanding the complexities, tensions, and dilemmas that Asian and other minority women in the U.K. grapple with in their quest for human rights. However, the adoption of multiculturalist approaches has also silenced women’s voices, obscuring, for example, the role of the family in gendered violence and abuse. Focusing on the work of Southall Black Sisters, and locating this work within current debates on the intersection of government policy, cultural diversity, (...)
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  13.  49
    Thomas M. Besch (2013). On a Reflexive Case for Human Rights. Journal of East-West Thought 3 (4):51-64.
    Can there be a "reflexive" or presuppositional, reasonably non-rejectable grounding of a Forst-type right to justification, or of a meaningful form of constitutive discursive standing? The paper argues that this is not so, and this for reasons that reflect more general limitations of presuppositional arguments for relevantly contested conclusions. To this end, the paper critically engages Forst's "reflexive" argument for human rights. It also considers O'Neill's presuppositional attempt to defend a form of cosmopolitanism, as well as the attempt (...)
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  14.  5
    Saulius Katuoka & Monika Dailidaitė (2012). Responsibility of Transnational Corporations for Human Rights Violations: Deficiencies of International Legal Background and Solutions Offered by National and Regional Legal Tools. Jurisprudence 19 (4):1301-1316.
    The article deals with the question how transnational corporations can bear direct responsibility for human rights abuses they commit by analysing the deficiencies of the current international legal background with respect to human rights and transnational corporations, and the solutions offered by national and regional legal tools. By establishing that current international law is incapable of reducing or compensating for governance gaps, the case law analysis shows that the litigation system under the Alien Tort Claims Act (...)
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  15.  2
    Maria Grazia Martino (2015). The Right to Mission in Human Rights Law, “Mission to Amish People” and “Jews for Jesus”. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 14 (42):78-99.
    This paper examines the position of international human rights law towards missionary or proselytizing activities with a special focus on the American context. By evaluating UN legal acts such as the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the 1960 Arcot Krishnaswami Study and the 1981 Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief and the American Convention of Human Rights, it investigates the extent to which such (...)
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  16.  1
    Luke Wilcox (2010). Secularists and Islamists in Morocco: Prospects for Building Trust and Civil Society Through Human Rights Reform. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (20):3-25.
    In Morocco’s process of liberalization (and democratization), the dynamics between social actors defining themselves as “secular” and those labeled “Islamist” are critical. This paper probes the possibility of these actors transcending their frequent opposition and building mutual trust and “civil” interaction, thereby strengthening civil society and the possibility of continued reform in Morocco. Using Morocco’s recent Equity and Reconciliation Commission as an analytical tool, the paper focuses on the human rights arena as a potentially fruitful place for Islamists (...)
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  17.  78
    Andrew Vincent (2009). Patriotism and Human Rights: An Argument for Unpatriotic Patriotism. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 13 (4):347 - 364.
    This paper centres on the question as to whether human rights can be reconciled with patriotism. It lays out the more conventional arguments which perceive them as incommensurable concepts. A central aspect of this incommensurability relates to the close historical tie between patriotism and the state. One further dimension of this argument is then articulated, namely, the contention that patriotism is an explicitly political concept. The implicit antagonism between, on the one hand, the state, politics and patriotism, and, (...)
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  18.  43
    A. Belden Fields (2003). Rethinking Human Rights for the New Millennium. Palgrave Macmillan.
    A. Belden Fields invites people to think more deeply about human rights in this book in an attempt to overcome many of the traditional arguments in the human rights literature. He argues that human rights should be reconceptualized in a holistic way to combine philosophical, historical, and empirical-practical dimensions. Human rights are viewed not as a set of universal abstractions but rather as a set (...)
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  19.  8
    Regina Valutytė (2012). State Liability for the Infringement of the Obligation to Refer for a Preliminary Ruling under the European Convention on Human Rights. Jurisprudence 19 (1):7-20.
    The article deals with the question whether a state might be held liable for the infringement of the European Convention on Human Rights if its national court of last instance fails to implement the obligation to make a reference for a preliminary ruling to the Court of Justice of the European Union under the conditions laid down in Article 267 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and developed in the case-law of the Court. Relying (...)
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  20.  13
    Carla C. J. M. Millar & Chong Ju Choi (2010). MNCs, Worker Identity and the Human Rights Gap for Local Managers. Journal of Business Ethics 97 (S1):55-60.
    This article analyses MNCs, worker identity and the ethical vulnerability caused by over-reliance on expatriate managers and under-reliance on local managers, who are often undervalued. It is argued that MNCs not only need but also have an obligation to assess local managers’ knowledge and contributions as having not only operational and market values, but also institutional value. Local managers both give access to and form part of local social capital and the treatment they receive is an element in the CSR (...)
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  21.  5
    Johanna Hanefeld, Virginia Bond, Janet Seeley, Shelley Lees & Nicola Desmond (2015). Considerations for a Human Rights Impact Assessment of a Population Wide Treatment for HIV Prevention Intervention. Developing World Bioethics 15 (3):115-124.
    Increasing attention is being paid to the potential of anti-retroviral treatment for HIV prevention. The possibility of eliminating HIV from a population through a universal test and treat intervention, where all people within a population are tested for HIV and all positive people immediately initiated on ART, as part of a wider prevention intervention, was first proposed in 2009. Several clinical trials testing this idea are now in inception phase. An intervention which relies on universally testing the entire population for (...)
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  22.  12
    Makoto Usami (2001). Retroactive Justice: Trials for Human Rights Violations Under a Prior Regime. In Burton M. Leiser & Tom D. Campbell (eds.), Human Rights in Philosophy and Practice. Ashgate 423--442.
    In the transition from a repressive to a democratic society, the successor government faces the problem of how to deal with grave human rights violations such as killings and torture committed under its predecessor. This paper analyzes the dilemma a new government may encounter when it attempts to prosecute and punish those found responsible. On one hand, trials of chargeable officers may be able to prevent human rights abuses in the future and to facilitate instituting or (...)
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  23.  20
    Richard Falk (2008). The Power of Rights and the Rights of Power: What Future for Human Rights? Ethics and Global Politics 1.
    This article explores the tensions between geopolitics and human rights under present conditions of world politics. It takes notes of the rise of human rights as a discourse in international law, and draws attention to the use of this discourse by powerful states, especially the United States, to validate non-defensive uses of force. It also notes the role of the media in facilitating the geopolitical agenda associated with exerting pressure on some conditions but exempting other situations (...)
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  24.  5
    Volker Heins (2008). Human Rights, Intellectual Property, and Struggles for Recognition. Human Rights Review 9 (2):213-232.
    This article examines recent controversies over the relationship between human rights and intellectual property rights (IPRs). Many activists have claimed that IPRs conflict with human rights. Others have argued that IPRs are themselves human rights. The article approaches the debate as an opportunity to clarify the nature of IPRs in relation to human rights, as well as the nature of contemporary struggles over these rights. After surveying the dual expansion of (...)
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  25.  26
    Jeremy J. Sarkin & Carly Fowler (2008). Reparations for Historical Human Rights Violations: The International and Historical Dimensions of the Alien Torts Claims Act Genocide Case of the Herero of Namibia. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 9 (3):331-360.
    Between 1904 and 1908, German colonialists in German South West Africa (GSWA, known today as Namibia) committed genocide and other international crimes against two indigenous groups, the Herero and the Nama. From the late 1990s, the Herero have sought reparations from the German government and several German corporations for what occurred more than a hundred years ago. This article examines and contextualizes the issues concerning reparations for historical human rights claims. It describes and analyzes the events in GSWA (...)
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  26.  22
    Merrilee H. Salmon (1999). Relativist Ethics, Scientific Objectivity, and Concern for Human Rights. Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (3):311-318.
    This paper comments on the conflict between ethical relativism and anthropologists’ concerns with rights, and tries to show that neither scientific objectivity nor respect for cultural diversity require denying an extracultural stance for ethical judgments.
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  27.  10
    Julie Mertus (2000). Beyond Borders: The Human Rights Imperative for Intervention in Kosovo. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 1 (2):78-87.
    A close reading of the United Nations Charter supports humanitarian intervention in Kosovo. While the explicit Charter provisions permitting force do not appear to be applicable, the Charter implicitly permitted and even mandated the action. The strongest justifications for humanitarian intervention in Kosovo are linked to affirmative human rights concerns, subject to substantive and procedural limitations. While the intervention in Kosovo was fully legal at the outset, any claims that the bombing campaign violated the laws of war should (...)
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  28.  1
    Kearsley A. Stewart (2006). Can a Human Rights Framework Improve Biomedical and Social Scientific HIV/AIDS Research for African Women? Human Rights Review 7 (2):130-136.
    In most countries in Africa, the epidemiologic profile of HIV/AIDS is significantly different from that of the USA or Europe. Women in Africa are as likely to be HIV positive as men, while young women are significantly more likely to be HIV positive than young men. How can health research in Africa be made more responsive and relevant to women’s health needs? And how would a human rights perspective change the conduct of biomedical and social scientific research on (...)
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  29.  29
    Louis Vervoort, Environmental Human Rights : Urgency for a Concrete Formulation.
    In the present article, I will evaluate the utility of environmental human rights in the light of the global climate conditions prevailing in the beginning of the second decade of the 21st century. Human rights and their tools have proven useful on many occasions. Here I will promote the idea that the ecological situation we are facing now is so urgent that we should exploit their potential to the fullest. To that end, I will argue, there (...)
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  30.  2
    Stefan Kirchner & Katarzyna Geler-Noch (2012). Compensation under the European Convention on Human Rights for Expropriations Enforced Prior to the Applicability of the Convention. Jurisprudence 19 (1):21-29.
    Forced expropriations of immovable property were common during the Communist era in Eastern Europe. Today, many of the former owners or their heirs are interested in regaining legal ownership of such properties, often decades after the ownership has been reallocated to others. Therefore, the conflict between old and new owners is often resolved in favour of the new owners. While this is understandable from a contemporary political perspective, this approach results in a perpetuation of the results of an earlier (...) rights violation, thereby resulting in a new human rights violation which will have to be measured against the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) if the state in question has ratified it prior to deciding how to handle the long-term effects of expropriations. Firstly, in the article we will devote ourselves to the interpretation of the right to property with an emphasis on the problem of expropriation. Above all, we will elaborate on the definition of the term “property” as well as positive and negative obligations of the Member States regarding this right. Finally, we will address the question of expropriations prior to the entry into force of the Convention and just compensation under Article 41 ECHR. Interpretation of the right to property will be supported by the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights. (shrink)
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  31.  11
    Mercy Berman & Jeanne M. Logsdon (2011). Business Obligations for Human Rights. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:189-201.
    While it is generally assumed that large corporations today give rhetorical support for basic human rights in public relations documents, skepticism continues toarise about the behavior of these firms. Do company actions support their rhetoric? This paper provides the initial analysis of our study of both rhetoric and practice regarding human rights in a small sample of large U.S. firms. At this point in the analysis, UNGC membership does not appear to have much influence on corporate (...)
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  32.  13
    Lyra Jakulevičienė & Vladimiras Siniovas (2013). Protection under the European Convention on Human Rights – Oasis for Asylum Seekers in Europe? Jurisprudence 20 (3):855-899.
    Even though the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (ECHR) does not explicitly address the rights of asylum seekers and refugees, the case law of the European Human Rights Court (ECtHR) confirms that their rights can be successfully defended under this mechanism. In parallel, in its evolving jurisprudence on asylum the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) refers to the Strasbourg case law, where there is a certain interrelationship (...)
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  33.  33
    Sofia Gruskin, Shahira Ahmed & Laura Ferguson (2008). Provider-Initiated Hiv Testing and Counseling in Health Facilities – What Does This Mean for the Health and Human Rights of Pregnant Women? Developing World Bioethics 8 (1):23–32.
    Since the introduction of drugs to prevent vertical transmission of HIV, the purpose of and approach to HIV testing of pregnant women has increasingly become an area of major controversy. In recent years, many strategies to increase the uptake of HIV testing have focused on offering HIV tests to women in pregnancy-related services. New global guidance issued by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) specifically notes these services as an entry point for (...)
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  34.  8
    Susan M. Easton (2002). Feminist Perspectives on the Human Rights Act: Two Cheers for Incorporation. Res Publica 8 (1):21-40.
    This paper considers feministperspectives on the Human Rights Act. Itdiscusses the reasons why many feminists aresceptical regarding the impact the Act willhave on women''s lives, including theimplications for anti-discrimination law,problems with the framework of rights in theEuropean Convention and deeper difficulties facingfeminism in negotiating rights discourse. Whileacknowledging these problems, it is argued thatthere are grounds for a more positiveinterpretation of incorporation. Questions arethen raised about the nature and scope of rightsand the role of the state in (...)
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  35.  36
    Deane-Peter Baker & James Pattison (2012). The Principled Case for Employing Private Military and Security Companies in Interventions for Human Rights Purposes. Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (1):1-18.
    The possibility of using private military and security companies to bolster the capacity to undertake intervention for human rights purposes has been increasingly debated. The focus of such discussions has, however, largely been on practical issues and the contingent problems posed by private force. By contrast, this article considers the principled case for privatising humanitarian intervention. It focuses on two central issues. First, does outsourcing humanitarian intervention to private military and security companies pose some (...)
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  36.  50
    Howard Ponzer (2009). A Case for Human Rights Feminism. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 16 (2):44-53.
    This article presents a case for human rights feminism as providing us with an effective, but too often under-recognized model for achieving equality in our society. From out of the context of recent feminism, with specific focus on Judith Butler, the author argues that the move to universal human rights is compatible with the critical tradition of identity politics as a means of realizing the goal of gender equality.
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  37.  45
    J. Ci (2005). Taking the Reasons for Human Rights Seriously. Political Theory 33 (2):243 - 265.
    The human rights discourse is vitiated by its tendency to reification, a tendency manifest in an ideologically motivated failure to take the reasons for human rights seriously. When a set of rights fall short, in range or strength, of the reasons adduced for them, any claim to the universality and priority of the rights in question is open to the charge of falsification and reification. Such a claim invites immanent critique insofar as a (...) rights discourse fails to take its own reasons seriously by working out a set of rights commensurate with them. Further critique is necessary if the human rights concept as such can be shown to be incapable of living up to the best reasons for human rights, in the shape, the author argues, of agency-based reasons. These kinds of critique, especially the latter, can serve as an antidote to the reifying tendency of the human rights discourse. (shrink)
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  38.  5
    Stepan Wood (2012). The Case for Leverage-Based Corporate Human Rights Responsibility. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (1):63-98.
    Should companies’ human rights responsibilities arise, in part, from their “leverage”—their ability to influence others’ actions through their relationships? Special Representative John Ruggie rejected this proposition in the United Nations Framework for business and human rights. I argue that leverage is a source of responsibility where there is a morally significant connection between the company and a rights-holder or rights-violator, the company is able to make a contribution to ameliorating the situation, it can do (...)
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  39.  4
    Sigrun I. Skogly (2009). Global Responsibility for Human Rights. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 29 (4):827-847.
    Globalization has made the protection of human rights and the prevention of violations of these rights more complex in recent years. This article reviews a book that challenges the current ‘wisdom’ of human rights obligations that almost uniquely focus on the behaviour of states in relation to their own populations. The focus of this review is the concept of ‘shared responsibility’ for human rights protection that is an essential topic of the book. It (...)
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  40.  5
    Ana Cecilia Vergara & Jorge Vergara Estévez (1994). Justice, Impunity and the Transition to Democracy: A Challenge for Human Rights Education. Journal of Moral Education 23 (3):273-284.
    Abstract This paper is a case study of the repression practised in Chile under the military dictatorship between 1973 and 1990. It outlines the psycho?dynamic mechanisms of terror and of the struggle against it. It raises critically the issue of impunity (officially declared amnesty for human rights violations) and its consequences for the sense of justice in a process of transition to democracy. The educational implications of this precarious situation are discussed. The article shows that a well?worked out (...)
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  41.  11
    Garrett Albert Duncan (2000). Race and Human Rights Violations in the United States: Considerations for Human Rights and Moral Educators. Journal of Moral Education 29 (2):183-201.
    In the previous article Mary M. Brabeck and Lauren Rogers called for dialogue between moral educators of North America and human rights educators of South America, noting that the latter group has much to offer the former for its work in the United States. In what follows, I posit that moral educators can learn not only from South American human rights workers but also from North Americans who have challenged US human rights violations, especially (...)
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  42.  19
    Tom Campbell (2006). A Human Rights Approach to Developing Voluntary Codes of Conduct for Multinational Corporations. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):255-270.
    Abstract: The criticism that voluntary codes of conduct are ineffective can be met by giving greater centrality to human rights in such codes. Provided the human rights obligations of multinational corporations are interpreted as moral obligations specifically tailored to the situation of multinational corporations, this could serve to bring powerful moral force to bear on MNCs and could provide a legitimating basis for NGO monitoring and persuasion. Approached in this way the human rights obligations (...)
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  43.  9
    Philip Alston (2013). Against a World Court for Human Rights. Ethics and International Affairs 2014 (2):13-71.
    Too much of the debate about how respect for human rights can be advanced on a global basis currently revolves around crisis situations involving so-called mass atrocity crimes and the possibility of addressing abuse through the use of military force. This preoccupation, as understandable as it is, serves to mask much harder questions of how to deal with what might be termed silent and continuous atrocities, such as gross forms of gender or ethnic discrimination or systemic police violence, (...)
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  44.  11
    Duane Windsor (2009). Developing a Global Regime for Human Rights. International Corporate Responsibility Series 4:83-105.
    This paper examines prospects for and content of a global regime for human rights. Competing schools of thought forecast convergence and divergence of national standards under stress of globalization. No such regime exists, and there is no compelling theory of international corporate social responsibility. However, elements of an emerging global regime can be identified and partially overlap with environmental protection issues. This regime is highly fragmented, underdeveloped, and only partially enforceable—but it is in development. The UN Global Compact, (...)
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  45.  30
    Alessandro Ferrara (2003). Two Notions of Humanity and the Judgment Argument for Human Rights. Political Theory 31 (3):392-420.
    This essay is about the difficulties connected with grounding human rights philosophically in a multicultural context. These difficulties are argued to derive from the tension between our aspiration to universal validity and our shared belief in the constitutive role of life-forms, traditions, cultures, and vocabularies vis-à-vis our conceptions of justice. Rawls's and Habermas's approaches to the justification of human rights are then briefly reconstructed and assessed. A symmetrical distribution of strong and weak points is argued to (...)
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  46.  11
    Yvonne Terlingen (2010). The United States and the Un's Targeted Sanctions of Suspected Terrorists: What Role for Human Rights? Ethics and International Affairs 24 (2):131-142.
    The UN Security Council's approach to counterterrorism, which the United States has greatly shaped, has generally shown a marked human rights deficit. The process for seizing the assets of and imposing travel bans on suspected terrorists and their financiers must be reformed.
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  47.  14
    Audrey Osler & Hugh Starkey (1994). Fundamental Issues in Teacher Education for Human Rights: A European Perspective. Journal of Moral Education 23 (3):349-359.
    Abstract Human rights education is an essential part of preparation for participation in a pluralistic democracy. As Europe aspires to be a continent of democratic states accepting human rights as their basic principles, a human rights ethic should be a feature of all schools within Europe. Human rights education provides an ethical and moral framework for living in community. Moreover, this ethical position is backed in Europe by the powerful legal framework of (...)
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  48.  23
    Mari Stenlund (2013). Is There a Right to Hold a Delusion? Delusions as a Challenge for Human Rights Discussion. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (4):829-843.
    The analysis presented in this article reveals an ambiguity and tension in human rights theory concerning the delusional person’s freedom of belief and thought. Firstly, it would appear that the concepts ‘opinion’ and ‘thought’ are defined in human rights discussion in such a way that they do include delusions. Secondly, the internal freedom to hold opinions and thoughts is defined in human rights discussion and international human rights covenants as an absolute (...) right which should not be restricted in any situation for any reason. These views, if understood literally, imply that a person has an absolute right to hold a delusion. However, this kind of conclusion has not been made in mental health laws, the ethical principles guiding psychiatric care or the practice of psychiatry. Instead, they assume that the use of involuntary antipsychotic medication is justified even thought its purpose is to influence delusions. The ambiguity and tension in human rights theory concerning the freedom of belief and thought challenge us to develop this theory within an interdisciplinary discussion so that people with delusions are taken into account properly. (shrink)
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    Alberto Artosi (2010). Please Don't Use Science or Mathematics in Arguing for Human Rights or Natural Law. Ratio Juris 23 (3):311-332.
    In the vast literature on human rights and natural law one finds arguments that draw on science or mathematics to support claims to universality and objectivity. Here are two such arguments: 1) Human rights are as universal (i.e., valid independently of their specific historical and cultural Western origin) as the laws and theories of science; and 2) principles of natural law have the same objective (metahistorical) validity as mathematical principles. In what follows I will examine these (...)
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  50. John Tasioulas (2009). Are Human Rights Essentially Triggers for Intervention? Philosophy Compass 4 (6):938-950.
    The orthodox conception of human rights holds that human rights are moral rights possessed by all human beings simply in virtue of their humanity. In recent years, advocates of a 'political' conception of human rights have criticized this view on the grounds that it overlooks the distinctive political function performed by human rights. This article evaluates the arguments of two such critics, John Rawls and Joseph Raz, who characterize the political (...)
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