Search results for 'Common Sense' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Susanna Rinard (2013). Why Philosophy Can Overturn Common Sense. In Tamar Szabo Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology Volume 4. Oxford University Press
    In part one I present a positive argument for the claim that philosophical argument can rationally overturn common sense. It is widely agreed that science can overturn common sense. But every scientific argument, I argue, relies on philosophical assumptions. If the scientific argument succeeds, then its philosophical assumptions must be more worthy of belief than the common sense proposition under attack. But this means there could be a philosophical argument against common sense, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  25
    Pietro Salis (2015). Grasp of Concepts: Common Sense and Expertise in an Inferentialist Framework. In P. Piccari M. Bianca (ed.), Epistemology of Ordinary Knowledge. Cambridge Scholars Publishing 289-297.
    The paper suggests a distinction between two dimensions of grasp of concepts within an inferentialist approach to conceptual content: a common sense "minimum" version, where a simple speaker needs just a few inferences to grasp a concept C, and an expert version, where the specialist is able to master a wide range of inferential transitions involving C. This paper tries to defend this distinction and to explore some of its basic implications.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  46
    Radu J. Bogdan (ed.) (1991). Mind and Common Sense: Philosophical Essays on Commonsense Psychology. Cambridge University Press.
    The contributors to this volume examine current controversies about the importance of common sense psychology for our understanding of the human mind. Common sense provides a familiar and friendly psychological scheme by which to talk about the mind. Its categories (belief, desire, intention, consciousness, emotion, and so on) tend to portray the mind as quite different from the rest of nature, and thus irreducible to physical matters and its laws. In this volume a variety of positions (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   63 citations  
  4. Howard Sankey (2014). Scientific Realism and Basic Common Sense. Kairos 10:11-24.
    This paper considers the relationship between science and common sense. It takes as its point of departure, Eddington’s distinction between the table of physics and the table of common sense, as well as Eddington’s suggestion that science shows common sense to be false. Against the suggestion that science shows common sense to be false, it is argued that there is a form of common sense, basic common sense, which (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Barry Smith (1995). Common Sense. In Barry Smith & David Woodruff Smith (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Husserl. New York: Cambridge University Press 394.
    Can there be a theory-free experience? And what would be the object of such an experience. Drawing on ideas set out by Husserl in the “Crisis” and in the second book of his “Ideas”, the paper presents answers to these questions in such a way as to provide a systematic survey of the content and ontology of common sense. In the second part of the paper Husserl’s ideas on the relationship between the common-sense world (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  6. Nafsika Athanassoulis (2005). Common-Sense Virtue Ethics and Moral Luck. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (3):265 - 276.
    Moral luck poses a problem for out conception of responsibility because it highlights a tension between morality and lack of control. Michael Slote’s common-sense virtue ethics claims to avoid this problem. However there are a number of objections to this claim. Firstly, it is not clear that Slote fully appreciates the problem posed by moral luck. Secondly, Slote’s move from the moral to the ethical is problematic. Thirdly it is not clear why we should want to abandon (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7.  54
    Noah Marcelino Lemos (2004). Common Sense: A Contemporary Defense. Cambridge University Press.
    Noah Lemos defends the common sense tradition--the view that permits us to justify the philosophical inquiry of many of the things we ordinarily think we know. He discusses the main features of this tradition as expounded by Thomas Reid, G.E. Moore and Roderick Chisholm in a text that will appeal to students and philosophers in epistemology and ethics.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  8.  21
    Gary Hatfield (1990). Scottish Common Sense in Germany, 1768-1800: A Contribution to the History of Critical Philosophy by Manfred Kuehn. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 81 (3):574-575.
    A review of: Manfred Kuehn. Scottish Common Sense in Germany, 1768-1800: A Contribution to the History of Critical Philosophy. (McGill-Queen's Studies in the History of Ideas.) xiv + 300 pp., app., bibl., index. Kingston, Ont./Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1987. $35.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  5
    Sandra Jovchelovitch (2008). The Rehabilitation of Common Sense: Social Representations, Science and Cognitive Polyphasia. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 38 (4):431-448.
    In Psychoanalysis, its image and its public Moscovici introduced the theory of social representations and took further the project of rehabilitating common sense. In this paper I examine this project through a consideration of the problem of cognitive polyphasia, and the continuity and discontinuity between different systems of knowing. Focusing on the relations between science and common sense. I ask why, despite considerable evidence to the contrary, the scientific imagination tends to deny its relation to (...) sense and believe that can displace it. I argue that the psychosocial dynamic between common sense and science is revealing of how heavily they are entangled in, and indeed indebted to each other. Even more, this dynamic allows for a full appreciation of what the theory of social representations calls states of cognitive polyphasia. Different systems of thinking and knowing do not displace each other but live side by side, co-existing in a variety of ways, fulfilling different functions and answering different needs in social life. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  10. Jack Reynolds (2010). Common Sense and Philosophical Methodology: Some Metaphilosophical Reflections on Analytic Philosophy and Deleuze. Philosophical Forum 41 (3):231-258.
    On the question of precisely what role common sense (or related datum like folk psychology, trust in pre-theoretic/intuitive judgments, etc.) should have in reigning in the possible excesses of our philosophical methods, the so-called ‘continental’ answer to this question, for the vast majority, would be “as little as possible”, whereas the analytic answer for the vast majority would be “a reasonably central one”. While this difference at the level of both rhetoric and meta-philosophy is sometimes – perhaps often (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  9
    Lehrer Keith (forthcoming). Common Sense and Skepticism: A Lecture. Synthese:1-14.
    This is an essay on G. E. Moore’s argument in defense of common sense against David Hume’s theory. However, the burden of essay is to show that, though Moore derived has argument from Thomas Reid, it was the latter who noted that the defense of common sense required more than showing that Hume’s theory conflicted with common sense. It required supplying a better theory than that of Hume’s of the operations of the human mind, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  30
    Boris Rähme (2013). Common Sense, Strict Incompatibilism, and Free Will. Philosophical Inquiries 1 (1):107-124.
    Peter van Inwagen and Colin McGinn hold that there are strong arguments for strict incompatibilism, i.e. for the claim that the free will thesis (F) is inconsistent not just with determinism but with the negation of determinism as well. Interestingly, both authors deny that these arguments are apt to justify the claim that (F) is false. I argue that van Inwagen and McGinn are right in taking the fact that epistemic commitment to (F) is deeply rooted in common (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  69
    Matthew Nudds (2001). Common-Sense and Scientific Psychology. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):171-180.
    In this paper I discuss the circumstances in which it would be right to revise a common-sense psychological categorisation -- such as the common-sense categorisation of emotions -- in the light of the results of empirical investigation. I argue that an answer to that question, familiar from eliminitivist arguments, should be rejected, and suggest that the issue turns on the ontological commitments of the explanations that common-sense psychological states enter into.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  56
    Kurt Mosser (2009). Kant and Wittgenstein: Common Sense, Therapy, and the Critical Philosophy. Philosophia 37 (1):1-20.
    Kant’s reputation for making absolutist claims about universal and necessary conditions for the possibility of experience are put here in the broader context of his goals for the Critical philosophy. It is shown that within that context, Kant’s claims can be seen as considerably more innocuous than they are traditionally regarded, underscoring his deep respect for “common sense” and sharing surprisingly similar goals with Wittgenstein in terms of what philosophy can, and at least as importantly cannot, provide.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  4
    Yūjirō Nakamura & John Krummel (2015). "The Logic of Place" and Common Sense. Social Imaginaries 1 (1).
    The essay is a written version of a talk Nakamura Yūjirō gave at the Collège international de philosophie in Paris in 1983. In the talk Nakamura connects the issue of common sense in his own work to that of place in Nishida Kitarō and the creative imagination in Miki Kiyoshi. He presents this connection between the notions of common sense, imagination, and place as constituting one important thread in contemporary Japanese philosophy. He begins by (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Olena Medelyan & Catherine Legg (2008). Integrating Cyc and Wikipedia: Folksonomy Meets Rigorously Defined Common-Sense. Proceedings of Wikipedia and AI Workshop at the AAAI-08 Conference. Chicago, US, July 12 2008.
    Integration of ontologies begins with establishing mappings between their concept entries. We map categories from the largest manually-built ontology, Cyc, onto Wikipedia articles describing corresponding concepts. Our method draws both on Wikipedia’s rich but chaotic hyperlink structure and Cyc’s carefully defined taxonomic and common-sense knowledge. On 9,333 manual alignments by one person, we achieve an F-measure of 90%; on 100 alignments by six human subjects the average agreement of the method with the subject is close to (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  11
    Patrick Daly (2014). Common Sense and the Common Morality in Theory and Practice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (3):187-203.
    The unfinished nature of Beauchamp and Childress’s account of the common morality after 34 years and seven editions raises questions about what is lacking, specifically in the way they carry out their project, more generally in the presuppositions of the classical liberal tradition on which they rely. Their wide-ranging review of ethical theories has not provided a method by which to move beyond a hypothetical approach to justification or, on a practical level regarding values conflict, beyond a questionable appeal (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Theo A. F. Kuipers & Anne Ruth Mackor (1995). Cognitive Patterns in Science and Common Sense: Groningen Studies in Philosophy of Science, Logic, and Epistemology. Rodopi.
    This collection of 17 articles offers an overview of the philosophical activities of a group of philosophers working at the Groningen University. The meta-methodological assumption which unifies the research of this group, holds that there is a way to do philosophy which is a middle course between abstract normative philosophy of science and descriptive social studies of science. On the one hand it is argued with social studies of science that philosophy should take notice of what scientists actually do. On (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  31
    Matjaž Potrč (2002). Transvaluationism, Common Sense and Indirect Correspondence. Acta Analytica 17 (1):101-119.
    The problem of reconciling the philosophical denial of ontological vagueness with common-sense beliefs positing vague objects, properties and relations is addressed. This project arises for any view denying ontological vagueness but is especially pressing for transvaluationism, which claims that ontological vagueness is impossible. The idea that truth, for vague discourse and vague thought-content, is an indirect form of language-thought correspondence is invoked and applied. It is pointed out that supervaluationism provides one way, but not necessarily the only (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  24
    Ingvar Johansson (2008). Formalizing Common Sense: An Operator-Based Approach to the Tibbles–Tib Problem. Synthese 163 (2):217 - 225.
    The paper argues, that a direct formalization of the way common sense thinks about the numerical identity of enduring entities, requires that traditional predicate logic is developed. If everyday language mirrors the world, then persons, organisms, organs, cells, and ordinary material things can lose some parts but nonetheless remain numerically exactly the same entity. In order to formalize this view, two new logical operators are introduced; and they bring with them some non-standard syntax. One of the operators is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  10
    Verena Mock (1996). Common Sense Und Logik in Jan Smedslunds 'Psychologik'. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 27 (2):281 - 306.
    Common Sense and Logic in Jan Smedslund's 'Psycho-logic'. This paper is about the efforts the norwegian psychologist Jan Smedslund made in analyzing and checking philosophically his theory called 'Psycho-logic'. I am going to reconstruct and discuss the debates between Smedslund and several critics, which have been going on since about 1978, mainly in the "Scandinavian Journal of Psychology". A result will be that the kind of modal logics Smedslund uses - a type with realistic semantics and epistemology - (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Mortimer Jerome Adler (1970/1996). The Time of Our Lives: The Ethics of Common Sense. Fordham University Press.
    Is it a good time to be alive? Is ours a good society to be alive in? Is it possible to have a good life in our time? And finally, does a good life consist of having a good time? Are happiness and “a good life” interchangeable? These are the questions that Mortimer Adler addresses himself to. The heart of the book lies in its conception of the good life for man, which provides the standard for measuring a century, a (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23. Michael De Medeiros (2010). Common Sense. Weigl Publishers.
    What is common sense? -- Back in time -- How does common sense work -- Understanding common sense -- More than common sense -- Common sense and mistakes -- Animal common sense -- More than common sense -- Common sense nonsense -- Common sense test.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Adam Morton (1980). Frames of Mind: Constraints On The Common-Sense Conception Of The Mental. Oxford University Press.
    This book was an early contribution to the theory of mind debate, and was the origin of the term 'theory theory'. It defends a prototype simulation account.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   109 citations  
  25. Annalisa Coliva (2010). Moore and Wittgenstein: Scepticism, Certainty, and Common Sense. Palgrave Macmillan.
  26. Nicholas Maxwell (1966). Physics and Common Sense. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 16 (February):295-311.
    In this paper I set out to solve the problem of how the world as we experience it, full of colours and other sensory qualities, and our inner experiences, can be reconciled with physics. I discuss and reject the views of J. J. C. Smart and Rom Harré. I argue that physics is concerned only to describe a selected aspect of all that there is – the causal aspect which determines how events evolve. Colours and other sensory qualities, lacking causal (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  27. Thomas Reid & Derek R. Brookes (1997). An Inquiry Into the Human Mind on the Principles of Common Sense : A Critical Edition. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   24 citations  
  28.  8
    James W. Cornman (1975). Perception, Common Sense And Science. Yale University Press.
  29.  24
    S. Seth Bordner (forthcoming). Immaterialism and Common Sense. In Bertil Belfrage & Richard Brook (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Berkeley. Continuum
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  97
    Nicholas Maxwell (1966). Physics and Common Sense. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 16 (February):295-311.
    In this paper I set out to solve the problem of how the world as we experience it, full of colours and other sensory qualities, and our inner experiences, can be reconciled with physics. I discuss and reject the views of J. J. C. Smart and Rom Harré. I argue that physics is concerned only to describe a selected aspect of all that there is – the causal aspect which determines how events evolve. Colours and other sensory qualities, lacking causal (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  31. Giovanni Stanghellini (2001). Psychopathology of Common Sense. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (2-3):201-218.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  32.  89
    Gualtiero Piccinini (2003). Data From Introspective Reports: Upgrading From Common Sense to Science. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (9-10):141-156.
    Introspective reports are used as sources of information about other minds, in both everyday life and science. Many scientists and philosophers consider this practice unjustified, while others have made the untestable assumption that introspection is a truthful method of private observation. I argue that neither skepticism nor faith concerning introspective reports are warranted. As an alternative, I consider our everyday, commonsensical reliance on each other’s introspective reports. When we hear people talk about their minds, we neither refuse to learn from (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  33. G. E. Davie (1954). Common Sense and Sense-Data. Philosophical Quarterly 4 (July):229-246.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  64
    Janet Levin (2000). Dispositional Theories of Color and the Claims of Common Sense. Philosophical Studies 100 (2):151-174.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  35. James Michelson (2004). Critique of (Im)Pure Reason: Evidence‐Based Medicine and Common Sense. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (2):157-161.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  36.  7
    Darryl M. De Marzio (2010). Dealing with Diversity: On the Uses of Common Sense in Descartes and Montaigne. Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (3):301-313.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  37.  22
    Marcus E. Green & Peter Ives (2009). Subalternity and Language: Overcoming the Fragmentation of Common Sense. Historical Materialism 17 (1):3-30.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  44
    Barry Smith (1995). The Structures of the Common-Sense World. Acta Philosophica Fennica 58 (290-317):290–317.
    While contemporary philosophers have devoted vast amounts of attention to the language we use in describing and finding our way about the world of everyday experience, they have, with few exceptions, refused to see this world itself as a fitting object of theoretical concern. In what follows I shall seek to show how the commonsensical world might be treated ontologically as an object of investigation in its own right. At the same time I shall seek to establish how such a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39. Thomas Reid (1997). Thomas Reid, an Inquiry Into the Human Mind: On the Principles of Common Sense. Pennsylvania State University Press.
  40.  8
    S. A. Grave (1960/1973). The Scottish Philosophy of Common Sense. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.
  41.  5
    Evandro Agazzi (2011). Logical Normativity and Common Sense Reasoning. Principia 15 (1):15-29.
    A lógica, considerada como uma disciplina técnica iniciada por Aristóteles e tipicamente representada pela variedade de cálculos lógicos modernos, constitui um esclarecimento e refinamento de uma convicção e prática presentes no senso comum, ou seja, o fato de que os seres humanos crêem que a verdade pode ser adquirida não apenas por evidência imediata, mas também por meio de argumentos. Como uma primeira aproximação, a lógica pode ser vista como um registro “descritivo” das principais formas de argumento presentes no senso (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  13
    John J. Haldane (1993). Theory, Realism and Common Sense: A Reply to Paul Churchland. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 93:321-327.
  43.  4
    Lutz Koch (1996). Common Sense as an Ingredient of the Self and the Community. Studies in Philosophy and Education 15 (1-2):61-68.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  1
    Verena Mock (1996). Common Sense Und Logik in Jan Smedslunds 'Psychologik'Common Sense and Logic in Jan Smedslund's 'Psycho-Logic'. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 27 (2):281-306.
    This paper is about the efforts the norwegian psychologist Jan Smedslund made in analyzing and checking philosophically his theory called ‘Psycho-logic’. I am going to reconstruct and discuss the debates between Smedslund and several critics, which have been going on since about 1978, mainly in the “Scandinavian Journal of Psychology”. A result will be that the kind of modal logics Smedslund uses — a type with realistic semantics and epistemology — is not the proper one for the analysis of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  1
    Clement W. K. Mundle (1960). Common Sense Versus Mr. Hirst's Theory of Perception. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 60:61-77.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. R. I. Aaron (1958). The Common Sense View of Sense-Perception. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 58:1-14.
  47. George Elder Davie (1973). The Social Significance of the Scottish Philosophy of Common Sense. [University of Dundee].
  48. A. Erdely (2010). A Comedy of Wisdoms: Common Sense and Beyond. Global [Distributor].
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Lynd Forguson (1989). Common Sense. Routledge.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Lawrence E. Joseph (1994). Common Sense: Why It's No Longer Common. Addison-Wesley Pub. Co..
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000