Search results for 'Communism and society' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Yvanka B. Raynova (2015). Civil Society and "Women's Movements" in Post-Communist Europe. An Appraisal 25 Years After the Fall of the Berlin Wall. In Community, Praxis, and Values in a Postmetaphysical Age: Studies on Exclusion and Social Integration in Feminist Theory and Contemporary Philosophy. Axia Academic Publisher 184-204.
    The aim of the article is to argue the thesis that, 25 years after the fall of communism, with the exception of former Yugoslavia, there has been and still is, a lack of „women’s movements“ in the post-communist countries. The author also proposes some explanations as to why there are dozens of women’s organizations but no women’s movements. In order to support her thesis, Raynova emphasizes the difference between “women’s movements”, “feminist movements” and “social movements”, and shows the (...)
     
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  2.  21
    J. Furner (2011). Marx's Sketch of Communist Society in The German Ideology and the Problems of Occupational Confinement and Occupational Identity. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (2):189-215.
    The sketch of communist society in The German Ideology is often dismissed for lacking seriousness or coherence. Thorough philological, contextual and philosophical inquiry reveals otherwise. The final version of the sketch enjoys a systematic place within Marx’s thought, as a description of activity in developed communism, and advances a provocative thesis of the negation of vocation. This thesis is composed of two distinct claims: occupational confinement is abolished, and occupational identities disappear. These claims recommend communist society on (...)
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  3. William Ernest Barton (1966). The Moral Challenge of Communism: Some Ethical Aspects of Marxist-Leninist Society. London, Friends Home Service Committee.
     
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  4. James Kern Feibleman (1937/1979). Christianity, Communism, and the Ideal Society: A Philosophical Approach to Modern Politics. Ams Press.
     
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  5.  10
    Leszek Nowak (1993). “Post-Communist Society”? Social Theory and Practice 19 (3):249-273.
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  6.  14
    Marilyn Fischer (1982). Tensions From Technology in Marx's Communist Society. Journal of Value Inquiry 16 (2):117-129.
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  7. Adam Czarnota (1997). Meaning of Rule of Law in Post-Communist Society. Rechtstheorie 17:179-196.
     
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  8.  13
    Walton Padelford & Darin W. White (2010). The Influence of Historical Socialism and Communism on the Shaping of a Society's Economic Ethos: An Exploratory Study of Central and Eastern Europe. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):109 - 117.
    This study utilizes an exploratory research design to investigate the influence of historical socialism and communism on the shaping of a society's economic ethos. The discussion of ethics and economics has a very long history across multiple disciplines including the founder of modern economics, Adam Smith. However, with the growth of economic science, academic consideration has shifted toward positive analysis while normative analysis has been left mainly to philosophers. By utilizing the newly developed Morality of Profit-Making (MPM) scale, (...)
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  9.  4
    John Gray (1993). From Post-Communism to Civil Society: The Reemergence of History and the Decline of the Western Model. Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (2):26-50.
    For virtually all the major schools of Western opinion, the collapse of the Communist regimes in Eastern Europe and in the Soviet Union, between 1989 and 1991, represents a triumph of Western values, ideas, and institutions. If, for triumphal conservatives, the events of late 1989 encompassed an endorsement of “democratic capitalism” that augured “the end of history,” for liberal and social democrats they could be understood as the repudiation by the peoples of the former Soviet bloc of Marxism-Leninism in all (...)
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  10.  15
    Dalia Báthory (2014). Weaving the Narrative Strings of the Communist Regimes – Building Society with Bricks of Stories. History of Communism in Europe 5:7-16.
    The long duration of the Communist regime cannot be explained without closely looking at the manners of creating shared meanings and agreement on explanations on the shared historical context. Narratives of legitimation, some easier to depict than others, were almost as important as the use of force in imposing the specific values of the regime. In other words, soft power was the buttress of hard power. But the nuances are numerous, once we put this otherwise obvious remark under closer scrutiny. (...)
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  11.  8
    Lawrence J. Walker & Thomas J. Moran (1991). Moral Reasoning in a Communist Chinese Society. Journal of Moral Education 20 (2):139-155.
    Abstract This study examined the cross?cultural universality of Kohlberg's theory of moral reasoning development in the People's Republic of China??a culture quite different from the one out of which the theory arose. In particular, the applicability of the theory was evaluated in terms of its comprehensiveness and the validity of the moral stage model. Participants were 52 adolescents and adults, drawn from five groups: moral leaders, intellectuals, workers, college and junior high school students. In individual interviews they responded to hypothetical (...)
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  12. Andrzej Flis (1999). The Polish Church as an Enemy of the Open Society: Some Reflections on the Post-Communist Social-Political Transformations in Central Europe. In I. C. Jarvie & Sandra Pralong (eds.), Popper's Open Society After Fifty Years: The Continuing Relevance of Karl Popper. Routledge
  13. Ross Gandy & William Shaw (1981). Marx and History: From Primitive Society to the Communist Future. Science and Society 45 (1):109-111.
     
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  14.  5
    Christian Lotz (forthcoming). The Return of Abstract Universalism. A Critique of David Graeber’s Concept of Society and Communism. Radical Philosophy Review.
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  15.  13
    A. E. Garvie (1936). Creative Society, a Study of the Relation of Christianity to Communism. By John Macmurray. (London: Student Christian Movement Press, 1935. Pp. 196. Price 5s. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 11 (43):362-.
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  16.  7
    Alfred E. Garvie (1937). Christianity, Communism, and the Ideal Society. A Philosophical Approach to Modern Politics. By James Feibleman. (London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd.1937. Pp. 419. Price 12s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 12 (48):502-.
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  17.  8
    Michael Kennedy & Daina Stukuls (1998). The Narrative of Civil Society in Communism's Collapse and Post-Communism's Alternative: Emancipation and the Challenge of Polish Protest and Baltic Nationalism. Constellations 5 (4):541-571.
  18. D. Ross Gandy (1980). Marx and History: From Primitive Society to the Communist Future. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 41 (1):241-242.
  19. Thomas Hosuck Kang (1973). Confucian Society Under Democracy in South Korea and Under Communism in North Korea.
  20. John Macmurray (1936). Creative Society, a Study of the Relation of Christianity to Communism. Philosophy 11 (43):362-363.
     
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  21. B. Nemec (1975). The Communist-Party and Socialist-Society. Filosoficky Casopis 23 (2):145-166.
     
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  22. Walton Padelford & Darin W. White (2010). The Influence of Historical Socialism and Communism on the Shaping of a Society’s Economic Ethos: An Exploratory Study of Central and Eastern Europe. Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):109-117.
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  23. Benjamin Sax (1985). Marx and History: From Primitive Society to the Communist Future : D. Ross Gandy , 190 Pp. $14.95. [REVIEW] History of European Ideas 6 (4):483-486.
     
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  24. Artemy Magun (2014). Negativity in Communism: Ontology and Politics. Russian Sociological Review 13 (1):9-25.
    The article addresses the notion of communism with a special angle of factuality and negativity, and not in the usual sense of a futurist utopia. After considering the main contemporary theories of communism in left-leaning political thought, the author turns to the Soviet experience of an “actually existing communism.” Apart from and against the bureaucratic state, a social reality existed organized around res nullius, that is, an unappropriated world that was not a collective property, as in the (...)
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  25. Daniela Angi (2011). Three Instances of Church and Anti-Communist Opposition: Hungary, Poland and Romania. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 10 (28):21-64.
    Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} The article analyzes the relationship between the dominant Churches from Hungary, Poland and Romania and the opposition to Communist regimes. The Churches – seen as institutional actors of civil society – are analyzed in terms of their material and symbolic resources which may act as prerequisites for (...)
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  26.  7
    Rena Selya (2012). Defending Scientific Freedom and Democracy: The Genetics Society of America's Response to Lysenko. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 45 (3):415 - 442.
    In the late 1940s and early 1950s, the leaders of the Genetics Society of America (GSA) struggled to find an appropriate group response to Trofim Lysenko's scientific claims and the Soviet treatment of geneticists. Although some of the leaders of the GSA favored a swift, critical response, procedural and ideological obstacles prevented them from following this path. Concerned about establishing scientific orthodoxy on one hand and politicizing the content of their science on the other, these American geneticists drew (...)
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  27. Bertell Ollman (1974). Alienation: Marx's Conception of Man in Capitalist Society. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 3 (3):485-493.
    In this book, the most thorough account of Marx's theory of alienation yet to have appeared in English, Professor Ollman reconstructs the theory from its constituent parts and offers it as a vantage point from which to view the rest of Marxism. The book further contains a detailed examination of Marx's philosophy of internal relations, the much neglected logical foudation of his method, and provides a systematic account of Marx's conception of human nature. Because of its almost unique concern with (...)
     
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  28.  22
    Karl Marx (1967/1997). Writings of the Young Marx on Philosophy and Society. Hackett Pub. Co..
    It features Easton and Guddat's own highly regarded translations (based on the best German editions as well as on the original manuscripts and first editions) ...
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  29. Mihailo Marković (1974). The Contemporary Marx: Essays on Humanist Communism. Spokesman Books.
  30. Milovan Djilas & Dorian Cooke (1969). The Unperfect Society Beyond the New Class. Methuen.
     
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  31. Herbert Marcuse (2013). One-Dimensional Man: Studies in the Ideology of Advanced Industrial Society. Routledge.
    One of the most important texts of modern times, Herbert Marcuse's analysis and image of a one-dimensional man in a one-dimensional society has shaped many young radicals' way of seeing and experiencing life. Published in 1964, it fast became an ideological bible for the emergent New Left. As Douglas Kellner notes in his introduction, Marcuse's greatest work was a 'damning indictment of contemporary Western societies, capitalist and communist.' Yet it also expressed the hopes of a radical philosopher that human (...)
     
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  32.  5
    Karl Sir Popper (2012). The Open Society and its Enemies. Routledge.
    ‘If in this book harsh words are spoken about some of the greatest among the intellectual leaders of mankind, my motive is not, I hope, to belittle them. It springs rather from my conviction that, if our civilization is to survive, we must break with the habit of deference to great men.’ - Karl Popper, from the Preface Written in political exile during the Second World War and first published in two volumes in 1945, Karl Popper’s The Open (...) and Its Enemies is one of the most influential books of all time. Hailed by Bertrand Russell as a ‘vigorous and profound defence of democracy’, its now legendary attack on the philosophies of Plato, Hegel and Marx exposed the dangers inherent in centrally planned political systems and through underground editions become an inspiration to lovers of freedom living under communism in Eastern Europe. Popper’s highly accessible style, his erudite and lucid explanations of the thoughts of great philosophers and the recent resurgence of totalitarian regimes around the world are just three of the reasons for the enduring popularity of The Open Society and Its Enemies and why it demands to be read today and in years to come. (shrink)
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  33. Karl Sir Popper (2015). The Open Society and its Enemies. Routledge.
    ‘If in this book harsh words are spoken about some of the greatest among the intellectual leaders of mankind, my motive is not, I hope, to belittle them. It springs rather from my conviction that, if our civilization is to survive, we must break with the habit of deference to great men.’ - Karl Popper, from the Preface Written in political exile during the Second World War and first published in two volumes in 1945, Karl Popper’s _The Open (...) and Its Enemies _is one of the most influential books of all time. Hailed by Bertrand Russell as a ‘vigorous and profound defence of democracy’, its now legendary attack on the philosophies of Plato, Hegel and Marx exposed the dangers inherent in centrally planned political systems and through underground editions become an inspiration to lovers of freedom living under communism in Eastern Europe. Popper’s highly accessible style, his erudite and lucid explanations of the thoughts of great philosophers and the recent resurgence of totalitarian regimes around the world are just three of the reasons for the enduring popularity of _The Open Society and Its Enemies_ and why it demands to be read today and in years to come. (shrink)
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  34.  6
    Krzysztof Brzechczyn (2009). In the Trap of Post-Socialist Stagnation: On Political Development of the Belarusian Society in the Years 1986-2006. In Tadeusz Buksiński (ed.), Democracy in Western and Post-Communist Countries. Twenty Years after the Fall of Communism. Peter Lang
    The aim of this paper is to analyze the political development of the Belarusian society in the years 1986–2006 in order to answer the following questions: (i) what was the impact of support the nomenclature of the Belarusian Communist Party gave to the Belarusian independence after August 1991 on the process of decrease in power regulation (or in other words – democratization), (ii) why initial period of decrease in power regulation was replaced by its growth and (iii) why this (...)
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  35.  29
    T. I. Oizerman (2009). Paradoxes in the Communist Theory of Marxism. Diogenes 56 (2-3):37-50.
    In their work The German Ideology, the founders of Marxism assert that the prerequisite of post-capitalist (defined by them as communist) society is the universal development of human abilities and all social relations. But then on the same page, contrary to this statement, it is alleged that the abolition of private property is not only highly topical but it is also an imperative history-making task. In Manifesto of the Communist Party, Marx and Engels explain that economic crises recurrently shaking (...)
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  36.  5
    Vincent Geoghegan (2004). Religion and Communism: Feuerbach, Marx and Bloch. The European Legacy 9 (5):585-595.
    Whilst Marx made scattered positive remarks about the details of communist society, he also made important negative indications. Religion features in this negativity: his critique of religion is withering, there is no mention of religious life in communism, and he is emphatic that religion will play no role in such a society. For Marx, one of the tangible freedoms of communism was freedom from religion. The critique of religion is fundamentally inscribed in the very genesis of (...)
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  37.  2
    P. N. Fedoseev (1962). The Dialectics of the Growth of Socialism Into Communism. Russian Studies in Philosophy 1 (2):25-35.
    Under today's conditions, when the Soviet Union is successfully engaged in the comprehensive construction of a communist society, and the prospect of uniform advancement toward communism seems possible for the socialist countries, the theoretical problems relating to the transition from socialism to communism acquire major importance. In our day, problems of scientific communism are resolved in practice, in the creative activity of tens and hundreds of millions of people. The success of the construction of communism (...)
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  38.  9
    Timothy Kenyon, Communism and the Fall of Man : The Social Theories of Thomas More and Gerrard Winstanley.
    The thesis examines the thought of Thomas More and Gerrard Winstanley, emphasizing the concern of both theorists with the prevailing moral depravity of human nature attributable to the Fall of Man, and their proposals for the amendment of men's conduct by institutional means, especially by the establishment of a communist society. The thesis opens with a conceptual exploration of 'utopianism' and 'millenarianism' before discussing the particular forms of these concepts employed by More and Winstanley. The introductory section also includes (...)
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  39. Costas Douzinas & Slavoj Žižek (eds.) (2010). The Idea of Communism. Verso.
    Responding to Alain Badiou’s ‘communist hypothesis’, the leading political philosophers of the Left convened in London in 2009 to take part in a landmark conference to discuss the perpetual, persistent notion that, in a truly emancipated society, all things should be owned in common. This volume brings together their discussions on the philosophical and political import of the communist idea, highlighting both its continuing significance and the need to reconfigure the concept within a world marked by havoc and crisis.
     
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  40. Eugene W. Holland (2011). Nomad Citizenship: Free-Market Communism and the Slow-Motion General Strike. Univ of Minnesota Press.
    _Nomad Citizenship_ argues for transforming our institutions and practices of citizenship and markets in order to release society from dependence on the state and capital. It changes Deleuze and Guattari’s concept of nomadology into a utopian project with immediate practical implications, developing ideas of a nonlinear Marxism and of the slow-motion general strike. Responding to the challenge of creating philosophical concepts with concrete applications, Eugene W. Holland looks outside the state to analyze contemporary political and economic development using the (...)
     
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  41.  6
    Michael Strevens (forthcoming). Scientific Sharing: Communism and the Social Contract. In Thomas Boyer-Kassem, Conor Mayo-Wilson & Michael Weisberg (eds.), Scientific Collaboration and Collective Knowledge. Oxford University Press
    Research programs regularly compete to achieve the same goal, such as the discovery of the structure of DNA or the construction of a TEA laser. The more the competing programs share information, the faster the goal is likely to be reached, to society's benefit. But the "priority rule"—the scientific norm mandating that the first program to reach the goal in question receive all the credit for the achievement—provides a powerful disincentive for programs to share information. How, then, is the (...)
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  42. Gilles Guiheux (2006). ""The Political" Participation" of Entrepreneurs: Challenge or Opportunity for the Chinese Communist Party? Social Research: An International Quarterly 73 (1):219-244.
    This article aims at analyzing the means of political influence that private entrepreneurs have accumulated along the years. For the Party-State that wishes to maintain its monopoly on political activities, the challenge is clearly to adjust to the rapidly changing shape of the Chinese society. The question being addressed is therefore how, in a still authoritarian regime, the emergence of a new social group or stratum, economically and socially influent, affects the political realm. In the first section, this article (...)
     
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  43. Cornelius Castoriadis (2010). A Society Adrift: Interviews and Debates, 1974-1997. Fordham University Press.
    The project of autonomy is not a utopia (1992) -- Why I am no longer a Marxist (1974) -- Imaginary significations (1982) -- Response to Richard Rorty (1995) -- On wars in Europe (1992) -- On the possibility of creating g new form of society (1977) -- What political parties cannot do (1979) -- Present issues for democracy (1986) -- These are bad times (1986) -- Do vanguards exist? (1987) -- What revolution is (1987) -- Neither a historical necessity (...)
     
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  44. Liu Xiaobo (2006). Reform in China: The Role of Civil Society. Social Research: An International Quarterly 73 (1):121-138.
    The material life of the vast majority of Chinese peasants is at a much higher level than during the totalitarian period of Mao’s rule. Despite corruption and social polarization, there is no chance that a large-scale famine will take place. Why is it that during the Maoist period, when tens of millions of peasants starved to death, we did not see any large-scale resistance movements, whereas today, during this relatively prosperous time, large-scale spontaneous resistance movements rise nearly ceaselessly? The main (...)
     
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  45.  15
    Frédéric Vandenberghe (2002). Working Out Marx: Marxism and the End of the Work Society. Thesis Eleven 69 (1):21-46.
    Reading the Communist Manifesto against the contemporary background of massive unemployment, the author argues that Marx's theory of work is no longer adequate to tackle the problem of `workers without work' and suggests that it has to be reformulated in such a way that its normative intuitions and its critical impulses can be maintained. In the first part, he presents a philosophical critique of Marxism that is inspired by Jürgen Habermas and Hannah Arendt. In the second part, he presents a (...)
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  46.  10
    Krzysztof Brzechczyn (2008). On Two Predictions of the Collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe That is What Conditions of Making Accurate Predictions in History Are? Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 38:15-22.
    The decline of communism in Eastern Europe in years 1989-1991 was a big surprise for Western Sovietology. The sudden disappearance of the object of research would undermine the reason of existence of the whole science. For this reason, in the first half of the 90s Western scientists tried to answer following question: why Sovietology was not able to predict the demise of communism. The purpose of my paper is not to make one more analysis of factors responsible for (...)
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  47.  5
    Chairperson William J. Parente (1996). The Contribution of Communist States to the Proscription of Racist Speech. The European Legacy 1 (2):801-811.
    (1996). The contribution of communist states to the proscription of racist speech. The European Legacy: Vol. 1, Fourth International Conference of the International Society for the study of European Ideas, pp. 801-811.
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  48.  11
    Peter Beilharz (1996). Socialism After Communism: Liberalism? The European Legacy 1 (2):538-544.
    (1996). Socialism after communism: Liberalism? The European Legacy: Vol. 1, Fourth International Conference of the International Society for the study of European Ideas, pp. 538-544.
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  49. Robert C. Tucker (1971). The Marxian Revolutionary Idea. Science and Society 35 (1):119-123.
     
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  50.  7
    J. Simons (2016). Benjamins Communist Idea: Aestheticized Politics, Technology, and the Rehearsal of Revolution. European Journal of Political Theory 15 (1):43-60.
    Recent interest in communism as an idea prompts reconsideration of Walter Benjamin’s conception of a “communist” aesthetic politics. In spite of Benjamin’s categorical condemnation of aestheticized politics, his artwork essay is better read as both explicit condemnation of a particular type of aestheticized politics and implicit commendation of another type. Under the modern conditions of the technological reproducibility of art, and mass politics, the character of and relationship between the cultural value spheres of politics and aesthetics also changes. Benjamin (...)
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