Search results for 'Community' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ericka Tucker (2013). Community Radio in Political Theory and Development Practice. Journal of Development and Communication Studies 2 (2-3):392 - 420.score: 25.0
    While to political theorists in the United States ‘community radio’ may seem a quaint holdover of the democratization movements of the 1960s, community radio has been an important tool in development contexts for decades. In this paper I investigate how community radio is conceptualized within and outside of the development frame, as a solution to development problems, as part of development projects communication strategy, and as a tool for increasing democratic political participation in development projects. I want (...)
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  2. Marc Bekoff (1997). Deep Ethology, Animal Rights, and the Great Ape/Animal Project: Resisting Speciesism and Expanding the Community of Equals. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (3):269-296.score: 24.0
    In this essay I argue that the evolutionary and comparative study of nonhuman animal (hereafter animal) cognition in a wide range of taxa by cognitive ethologists can readily inform discussions about animal protection and animal rights. However, while it is clear that there is a link between animal cognitive abilities and animal pain and suffering, I agree with Jeremy Bentham who claimed long ago the real question does not deal with whether individuals can think or reason but rather with whether (...)
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  3. Lucas Thorpe (2011). Kant on the Relationship Between Autonomy and Community. In Lucas Thorpe & Charlton Payne (eds.), Kant and The Concept of Community. A North American Kant Society Volume: Rochester University Press.score: 24.0
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  4. Vanessa Paz Dennen (2009). Constructing Academic Alter-Egos: Identity Issues in a Blog-Based Community. [REVIEW] Identity in the Information Society 2 (1):23-38.score: 24.0
    Choosing to interact with others in an online forum provides an opportunity for exploring one’s own identity. With each new group joined, a person must make decisions about self-presentation and react to an audience. Such decisions continue as social interactions occur and relationships develop. This paper discusses how bloggers who have affiliated with each other to form a loosely knit community develop largely pseudonymous identities along with norms surrounding the development and performance of identity. The study is ethnographic and (...)
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  5. Domènec Melé (2012). The Firm as a “Community of Persons”: A Pillar of Humanistic Business Ethos. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (1):89-101.score: 24.0
    The article starts by arguing that seeing the firm as a mere nexus of contracts or as an abstract entity where different stakeholder interests concur is insufficient for a “humanistic business ethos”, which entails a complete view of the human being. It seems more appropriate to understand the firm as a human community, a concept which can be found in several sources, including managerial literature, business ethics scholars, and Catholic Social Teaching. In addition, there are also philosophical grounds that (...)
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  6. Chong Ju Choi & Ron Berger (2009). Ethics of Global Internet, Community and Fame Addiction. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):193 - 200.score: 24.0
    Robert Putnam in his book Bowling Alone and subsequent works has analysed the phenomenon that American society increasingly avoids various community driven activities, such as civic associations, activities with friends and family (Putnam, Bowling Alone. Simon and Schuster, New York; 2006). In this paper we introduce the idea that a counterpart to this social trend is a global addiction to fame and celebrity. We believe that the global internet is one of the major drivers of this search for fame (...)
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  7. Linda M. Sama & Victoria Shoaf (2008). Ethical Leadership for the Professions: Fostering a Moral Community. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):39 - 46.score: 24.0
    This paper examines the professions as examples of “moral community” and explores how professional leaders possessed of moral intelligence can make a contribution to enhance the ethical fabric of their communities. The paper offers a model of ethical leadership in the professional business sector that will improve our understanding of how ethical behavior in the professions confers legitimacy and sustainability necessary to achieving the professions’ goals, and how a leadership approach to ethics can serve as an effective tool for (...)
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  8. Majid Yar (2003). Honneth and the Communitarians: Towards a Recognitive Critical Theory of Community. Res Publica 9 (2):101-125.score: 24.0
    This paper attempts to sketch a critical model of political community by drawing upon recent contributions to the theory of ‘recognition’, particularly in the work of Axel Honneth. The paper proceeds by, first, delineating key features shared by a range of positions associated with ‘communitarianism’, along with the limitations and problems incurred by these commitments. The second part of the paper attempts to mobilise Honneth’s theoretical work to develop a conception of community that shares a number of the (...)
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  9. Jehan Loza (2004). Business–Community Partnerships: The Case for Community Organization Capacity Building. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 53 (3):297-311.score: 24.0
    Globalization processes have resulted in greater complexity, interdependence and limited resources. Consequently, no one sector can effectively respond to today's business or wider challenges and opportunities. Non-government organizations and corporations are increasingly engaging each other in recognition that shareholder and societal value are intrinsically linked. For both sectors, these partnerships can create an enabling environment to address social issues and can generate social capital. Located in the Australian context, this paper explores the dimensions of community organization capacity building as (...)
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  10. Natalie Clark, Sarah Hunt, Georgia Jules & Trevor Good (2010). Ethical Dilemmas in Community-Based Research: Working with Vulnerable Youth in Rural Communities. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (4):243-252.score: 24.0
    Ethical Dilemmas in Community-Based Research: Working with Vulnerable Youth in Rural Communities Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10805-010-9123-y Authors Natalie Clark, Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC Canada V2C 5N3 Sarah Hunt, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada Georgia Jules, Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC Canada V2C 5N3 Trevor Good, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada Journal Journal of Academic Ethics Online ISSN 1572-8544 Print ISSN 1570-1727 Journal Volume Volume 8 Journal Issue Volume 8, Number 4.
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  11. David B. Resnik, Paul L. Ranelli & Susan P. Resnik (2000). The Conflict Between Ethics and Business in Community Pharmacy: What About Patient Counseling? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 28 (2):179 - 186.score: 24.0
    Patient counseling is a cornerstone of ethical pharmacy practice and high quality pharmaceutical care. Counseling promotes patient compliance with prescription regimens and prevents dangerous drug interactions and medication errors. Counseling also promotes informed consent and protects pharmacists against legal risks. However, economic, social, and technological changes in pharmacy practice often force community pharmacists to choose between their professional obligations to counsel patients and business objectives. State and federal legislatures have enacted laws that require pharmacists to counsel patients, but these (...)
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  12. Vivien Runnels, Elizabeth Hay, Elyse Sevigny & Paddi O.’Hara (2009). The Ethics of Conducting Community-Engaged Homelessness Research. Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (1-2):57-68.score: 24.0
    This paper focuses on some of the ethical issues which may arise when conducting research in the context of homelessness. These issues are considered from the viewpoints of researchers, research coordinators and interviewers, drawing from their extensive real world experience. In addition to negotiating the complex context of homelessness, community-based homelessness researchers need to address a number of ethical issues in research conception, design, implementation and dissemination. Although these issues are commonly considered in community-engaged research, research with people (...)
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  13. Frances Bowen, Aloysius Newenham-Kahindi & Irene Herremans (2010). When Suits Meet Roots: The Antecedents and Consequences of Community Engagement Strategy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (2):297 - 318.score: 24.0
    Understanding firms' interfaces with the community has become a familiar strategic concern for both firms and non-profit organizations. However, it is still not clear when different community engagement strategies are appropriate or how such strategies might benefit the firm and community. In this review, we examine when, how and why firms benefit from community engagement strategies through a systematic review of over 200 academic and practitioner knowledge sources on the antecedents and consequences of community engagement (...)
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  14. Cicely Roche & Felicity Kelliher (2009). Exploring the Patient Consent Process in Community Pharmacy Practice. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):91 - 99.score: 24.0
    This article explores the patient consent process in modern community pharmacy practice and discusses the related ethical dilemmas in this environment. The myth of appropriately informed consent, and irrefutable evidence as to a pharmacist’s intentions when advising a patient, are core issues for discussion. The objective is to clarify where such dilemmas may exist in the consent process and to ultimately form a framework against which ethical guidelines might facilitate resolution of the dilemma faced by the pharmacist who is (...)
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  15. Domenic Berducci (2010). Teaching, Learning, Describing, and Judging Via Wittgensteinian Rules: Connections to Community. [REVIEW] Human Studies 33 (4):445-463.score: 24.0
    This article examines the learning of a scientific procedure, and its connection to the greater scientific community through the notion of Wittgensteinian rules. The analysis reveals this connection by demonstrating that learning in interaction is largely grounded in rule-based community descriptions and judgments rather than any inner process. This same analysis also demonstrates that learning processes are particularly suited for such an analysis because rules and concomitant phenomena comprise a significant portion of any learning interaction. This analysis further (...)
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  16. Robert C. Hughes (2014). Justifying Community Benefit Requirements in International Research. Bioethics 28 (8):397-404.score: 24.0
    It is widely agreed that foreign sponsors of research in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are morally required to ensure that their research benefits the broader host community. There is no agreement, however, about how much benefit or what type of benefit research sponsors must provide, nor is there agreement about what group of people is entitled to benefit. To settle these questions, it is necessary to examine why research sponsors have an obligation to benefit the broader host (...), not only their subjects. Justifying this claim is not straightforward. There are three justifications for an obligation to benefit host communities that each apply to some research, but not to all. Each requires a different amount of benefit, and each requires benefit to be directed toward a different group. If research involves significant net risk to LMIC subjects, research must provide adequate benefit to people in LMICs to avoid an unjustified appeal to subjects’ altruism. If research places significant burdens on public resources, research must provide fair compensation to the community whose public resources are burdened. If research is for profit, research sponsors must contribute adequately to the upkeep of public goods from which they benefit in order to avoid the wrong of free-riding, even if their use of these public goods is not burdensome. (shrink)
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  17. Judy N. Muthuri, Wendy Chapple & Jeremy Moon (2009). An Integrated Approach to Implementing 'Community Participation' in Corporate Community Involvement: Lessons From Magadi Soda Company in Kenya. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):431 - 444.score: 24.0
    Corporate community involvement (CCI) is often regarded as means of development in developing countries. However, CCI is often criticised for patronage and insensitivity both to context and local priorities. A key concern is the extent of 'community participation' in corporate social decision-making. Community participation in CCI offers an opportunity for these criticisms to be addressed. This paper presents findings of research examining community participation in CCI governance undertaken by Magadi Soda Company in Kenya. We draw on (...)
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  18. Brian T. Prosser & Andrew Ward (2000). Kierkegaard and the Internet: Existential Reflections on Education and Community. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 2 (3):167-180.score: 24.0
    If the rhetorical and economic investment of educators, policy makersand the popular press in the United States is any indication, thenunbridled enthusiasm for the introduction of computer mediatedcommunication (CMC) into the educational process is wide-spread.In large part this enthusiasm is rooted in the hope that throughthe use of Internet-based CMC we may create an expanded communityof learners and educators not principally bounded by physicalgeography. The purpose of this paper is to reflect critically uponwhether students and teachers are truly linked together (...)
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  19. Kristen Lyons & James Whelan (2010). Community Engagement to Facilitate, Legitimize and Accelerate the Advancement of Nanotechnologies in Australia. NanoEthics 4 (1):53-66.score: 24.0
    There are increasing calls internationally for the development of regulation and policies related to the rapidly growing nanotechnologies sector. As part of the process of policy formation, it is widely accepted that deliberative community engagement processes should be included, enabling publics to have a say about nanotechnologies, expressing their hopes and fears, issues and concerns, and that these will be considered as part of the policy process. The Australian Federal and State governments have demonstrated a commitment to these ideals, (...)
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  20. Marion Smiley (1992). Moral Responsibility and the Boundaries of Community. University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    This book has three goals. The first is to demonstrate that the modern, distinctly Kantian, notion of moral responsibility is incoherent by virtue of the way it fuses free will and blameworthiness. The second is to develop an alternative notion of moral responsibility that separates causal responsibility from blameworthiness and views both as relative to the boundaries of our moral community. The third is to establish a framework for arguing openly about our moral responsibility for particular kinds of harm.
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  21. Clement Loo (2014). The Role of Community Participation in Climate Change Assessment and Research. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (1):65-85.score: 24.0
    There is currently a gap between assessment and intervention in the literature concerned with climate change and food. While intervention is local and context dependent, current assessments are usually global and abstract. Available assessments are useful for understanding the scale of the effects of climate change and they are ideal for motivating arguments in favor of mitigation and adaptation. However, adaptation projects need assessments that can provide data to support their efforts. This requires the adoption of a more local and (...)
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  22. Colleen Reid & Elana Brief (2009). Confronting Condescending Ethics: How Community-Based Research Challenges Traditional Approaches to Consent, Confidentiality, and Capacity. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (1-2):75-85.score: 24.0
    Community based research is conducted by, for, and with the participation of community members, and aims to ensure that knowledge contributes to making a concrete and constructive difference in the world (The Loka Institute 2002). Yet decisions about research ethics are often controlled outside the research community itself. In this analysis we grapple with the imposition of a community confidentiality clause and the implications it had for consent, confidentiality, and capacity in a province-wide community based (...)
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  23. Michael Raposa (2011). Troubled Diversities, Multiple Identities and the Relevance of Royce: What Makes a Community Worth Caring About? Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (4):432-443.score: 24.0
    This article raises questions about what it means to be a diverse academic community and about why such diversity is worth struggling to achieve. The controversial arguments of Walter Benn Michaels are critically examined as a stimulus and prelude to considering the more constructive perspectives supplied by Amartya Sen and Josiah Royce. Royce's early 20th century philosophical writings, in particular, are evaluated as resources for thinking about the ideal nature of a college or university community in the 21st (...)
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  24. Doug Brugge & Alison Kole (2003). A Case Study of Community-Based Participatory Research Ethics: The Healthy Public Housing Initiative. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (4):485-501.score: 24.0
    We conducted and analyzed qualitative interviews with 12 persons working on the Healthy Public Housing Initiative in Boston, Massachusetts in 2001. Our goal was to generate ideas and themes related to the ethics of the community-based participatory research in which they were engaged. Specifically, we wanted to see if we found themes that differed from conventional research that is based on an individualistic ethics. There were clearly distinct ethical issues raised with respect to projects and individuals who engage in (...)
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  25. Maurice E. Schweitzer & Donald E. Gibson (2008). Fairness, Feelings, and Ethical Decision- Making: Consequences of Violating Community Standards of Fairness. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):287 - 301.score: 24.0
    In this article, we describe the influence of violations of community standards of fairness (Kahneman, Knetsch, and Thaler, 1986a) on subsequent ethical decision-making and emotions. Across two studies, we manipulated explanations for a common action, and we find that explanations that violate community standards of fairness (e.g., by taking advantage of an in crease in market power) lead to greater intentions to behave unethically than explanations that are consistent with community standards of fairness (e.g., by passing along (...)
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  26. Craig Cormick (2010). The Challenges of Community Engagement. NanoEthics 4 (3):229-231.score: 24.0
    Lyons and Whelan provide a useful list of recommendations as to how community engagement on nanotechnology could be improved, which very few people working in community engagement could disagree with. However, as the conclusions of any study are dependent on the data obtained, if more data had been obtained and analysed then different conclusions might have been reached. Addressing the key issues in the paper and providing more data, also allows an opportunity to expand on current issues relating (...)
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  27. Margaret Ann Griesse (2007). Caterpillar's Interactions with Piracicaba, Brazil: A Community-Based Analysis of CSR. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 73 (1):39 - 51.score: 24.0
    This study examines how Caterpillar Brasil Limitada, located in the city of Piracicaba, Brazil, expanded its concept of social responsibility over a 30-year period. It first provides a contextual overview of Piracicaba within the agro-industrialized interior region of São Paulo State. It then traces the history of the firm from its initial installation in the city. While Caterpillar maintained a distant relationship with the Piracicaba community for many years, it later realized the importance of becoming involved in city development. (...)
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  28. Leland Horn & Michael Kennedy (2008). Collaboration in Business Schools: A Foundation for Community Success. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (1):7-15.score: 24.0
    Business schools are often thought of as being accountable for the individual student’s personal development and preparation to enter the business community. While true that business schools guide knowledge development, they must also fulfill a social contract with the business community to provide ethical entry-level business professionals. Three stakeholders, students, faculty, and the business community, are involved in developing and strengthening an understanding of ethical behavior and the serious impacts associated with an ethical lapse. This paper discusses (...)
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  29. Merja Lähdesmäki & Timo Suutari (2012). Keeping at Arm's Length or Searching for Social Proximity? Corporate Social Responsibility as a Reciprocal Process Between Small Businesses and the Local Community. Journal of Business Ethics 108 (4):481 - 493.score: 24.0
    This article examines the relationship between corporate social responsibility and locality in the small business context. This issue is addressed by studying the interplay between small businesses and local community based on the embeddedness literature and using the concept of social proximity. On the basis of 25 thematic interviews with owner-managers a typology is constructed which illustrates the owner-managers' perceptions of the relationship between the business and the local community. The findings emphasize the importance of reciprocity as it (...)
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  30. Stephen Brammer & Stephen Pavelin (2005). Corporate Community Contributions in the United Kingdom and the United States. Journal of Business Ethics 56 (1):15 - 26.score: 24.0
    We address the issue of UK firms relatively poor record of corporate community contributions (CCCs) by subjecting them to formal comparison with those of US firms. To this end, we employ data on the top 100 UK, and top 100 US, contributors in 2001. Cross-country differences are described and discussed with reference to a stakeholder perspective on corporate social responsibility, and CCCs in particular. In this connection, we evaluate the role played by the sectoral composition of activities, as well (...)
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  31. Stephen Brammer & Andrew Millington (2003). The Effect of Stakeholder Preferences, Organizational Structure and Industry Type on Corporate Community Involvement. Journal of Business Ethics 45 (3):213 - 226.score: 24.0
    This paper analyses the relationships between corporate community involvement activities, the organizational structures within which they are managed, the firm's industry and evolving stakeholder attitudes and preferences in a sample of 148 U.K. based firms who have demonstrated a clear desire to be socially responsible. The research highlights significant associations between the allocation of responsibility for community involvement within the firm, its industry and the extent of its community involvement activities. Consistent with the view that managerial structures (...)
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  32. Taylor Dotson (2013). Design for Community: Toward a Communitarian Ergonomics. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 26 (2):139-157.score: 24.0
    This paper explores how the designed world could be better supportive of better communal ways of relating. In pursuit of this end, I put the philosophy of technology dealing with the role that technologies play in shaping, directing, mediating, and legislating human action in better communication with a diverse literature concerning community. I argue that community ought to viewed as composed of three interrelated dimensions: experience, structure, and practice. Specifically, it is a psychological sense evoked via a particular (...)
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  33. Derek Edyvane (2005). A Back-Turning Harmony: Conflict as a Source of Political Community. [REVIEW] Res Publica 11 (1):27-54.score: 24.0
    It is widely assumed that community presupposes consensus on the good. As a result, liberals who acknowledge the permanence of pluralism have struggled to explain how a liberal society could realise the good of community. Here it is argued that our initial assumption is wrong. Conflict can serve as a source of political community. Our devotion to the things we care about provides us with reason to embark on a quest aimed at the elimination of conflict. The (...)
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  34. Christoph Kneiding & Paul Tracey (2009). Towards a Performance Measurement Framework for Community Development Finance Institutions in the Uk. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (3):327 - 345.score: 24.0
    Community Development Finance Institutions (CDFIs) are publicly funded organisations that provide small loans to people in financially underserved areas of the UK. Policy makers have repeatedly sought to understand and measure the performance of CDFIs to ensure the efficient use of public funds, but have struggled to identify an appropriate way of doing so. In this article, we empirically derive a framework that measures the performance of CDFIs through an analysis of their stakeholder relationships. Based on qualitative data from (...)
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  35. Bridget Pratt, Khin Maung Lwin, Deborah Zion, Francois Nosten, Bebe Loff & Phaik Yeong Cheah (2013). Exploitation and Community Engagement: Can Community Advisory Boards Successfully Assume a Role Minimising Exploitation in International Research? Developing World Bioethics 14 (2).score: 24.0
    It has been suggested that community advisory boards (CABs) can play a role in minimising exploitation in international research. To get a better idea of what this requires and whether it might be achievable, the paper first describes core elements that we suggest must be in place for a CAB to reduce the potential for exploitation. The paper then examines a CAB established by the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit under conditions common in resource-poor settings – namely, where individuals join (...)
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  36. Paul Tracey, Nelson Phillips & Helen Haugh (2005). Beyond Philanthropy: Community Enterprise as a Basis for Corporate Citizenship. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 58 (4):327 - 344.score: 24.0
    In this article we argue that the emergence of a new form of organization – community enterprise – provides an alternative mechanism for corporations to behave in socially responsible ways. Community enterprises are distinguished from other third sector organisations by their generation of income through trading, rather than philanthropy and/or government subsidy, to finance their social goals. They also include democratic governance structures which allow members of the community or constituency they serve to participate in the management (...)
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  37. Yen-Zen Tsai (2008). Selfhood and Fiduciary Community: A Smithian Reading of Tu Weiming's Confucian Humanism. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (4):349-365.score: 24.0
    Weiming, as a leading spokesman for contemporary New Confucianism, has been reinterpreting the Confucian tradition in the face of the challenges of modernity. Tu takes selfhood as his starting point, emphasizing the importance of cultivating the human mind-and-heart as a deepening and broadening process to realize the anthropocosmic dao. He highlights the concept of a fiduciary community and advocates that, because of it, Confucianism remains a dynamic inclusive humanism. Tu’s mode of thinking tallies well with Wilfred C. Smith’s vision (...)
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  38. Iratxe Zarraonaindia, Daniel P. Smith & Jack A. Gilbert (2013). Beyond the Genome: Community-Level Analysis of the Microbial World. Biology and Philosophy 28 (2):261-282.score: 24.0
    The development of culture-independent strategies to study microbial diversity and function has led to a revolution in microbial ecology, enabling us to address fundamental questions about the distribution of microbes and their influence on Earth’s biogeochemical cycles. This article discusses some of the progress that scientists have made with the use of so-called “omic” techniques (metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, and metaproteomics) and the limitations and major challenges these approaches are currently facing. These ‘omic methods have been used to describe the taxonomic structure (...)
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  39. Joseph Cain (1994). Ernst Mayr as Community Architect: Launching the Society for the Study of Evolution and the Journalevolution. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 9 (3):387-427.score: 24.0
    Ernst Mayr''s contributions to 20th century biology extend far beyond his defense of certain elements in evolutionary theory. At the center of mid-century efforts in American evolutionary studies to build large research communities, Mayr spearheaded campaigns to create a Society for the Study of Evolution and a dedicated journal,Evolution, in 1946. Begun to offset the prominence ofDrosophila biology and evolutionary genetics, these campaigns changed course repeatedly, as impediments appeared, tactics shifted, and compromises built a growing coalition of support. Preserved, however, (...)
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  40. Martin Myers & Kalwant Bhopal (2009). Gypsy, Roma and Traveller Children in Schools: Understandings of Community and Safety. British Journal of Educational Studies 57 (4):417 - 434.score: 24.0
    This paper examines understandings of community and safety for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller (GRT) groups in schools in a metropolitan borough. One school in particular was identified as being the 'Gypsy school' and was attended by the majority of GRT children in the borough. The school was recognised as a model of 'good practice' reflecting its holistic approach towards the GRT community but it was also successful for wider reasons. A picture of the intersection of different communities emerged (...)
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  41. Dennis P. Wittmer (2004). Business and Community: Integrating Service Learning in Graduate Business Education. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 51 (4):359-371.score: 24.0
    For the past five years at the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver a community service or service learning component has been included in the Values in Action class (now Values-Based Leadership), a core MBA course that integrates ethics, law, and public policy perspectives on business issues. This paper summarizes the educational philosophy and the mechanics of this required component. Few empirical studies have been conducted to gauge the perceived value and impact of a service learning (...)
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  42. Clinton Golding (forthcoming). The Community of Inquiry: Blending Philosophical and Empirical Research. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-12.score: 24.0
    Philosophical research tends to be done separately from empirical research, but this makes it difficult to tackle questions which require both. To make it easier to address these hybrid research questions, I argue that we should sometimes combine philosophical and empirical investigations. I start by describing a continuum of research methods from data collecting and analysing to philosophical arguing and conceptualising. Then, I outline one possible middle-ground position where research is equally philosophical and empirical: the Community of Inquiry reconceived (...)
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  43. Nicola Barsdorf, Suzanne Maman, Nancy Kass & Catherine Slack (2010). Access to Treatment in Hiv Prevention Trials: Perspectives From a South African Community. Developing World Bioethics 10 (2):78-87.score: 24.0
    Access to treatment, in HIV vaccine trials (HVTs), remains ethically controversial. In most prevention trials, including in South Africa, participants who seroconvert are referred to publicly funded programmes for treatment. This strategy is problematic when there is inadequate and uneven access to public sector antiretroviral therapy (ART) and support resources. The responsibilities, if any, of researchers, sponsors and public health authorities involved in HVTs has been hotly debated among academics, scholars, representatives of international organizations and sponsors. However, there is little (...)
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  44. D. Micah Hester (2004). What Must We Mean by “Community”? A Processive Account. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (5-6):423-437.score: 24.0
    The term community in ethics and bioethics traditionally has been used to designate either a specific kind of moral relationship available to rational agents or, in contrast, the context in which any sense of rational agency can even be understood. I argue that bioethics is better served when both selves and community are expressed through a more processive language that highlights the functional character of such concepts. In particular, I see the turn to processive community in bioethics (...)
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  45. Noor Munirah Isa, Azizan Baharuddin, Saadan Man & Chang Lee Wei (2014). Bioethics in the Malay‐Muslim Community in Malaysia: A Study on the Formulation of Fatwa on Genetically Modified Food by the National Fatwa Council. Developing World Bioethics 14 (2).score: 24.0
    The field of bioethics aims to ensure that modern scientific and technological advancements have been primarily developed for the benefits of humankind. This field is deeply rooted in the traditions of Western moral philosophy and socio-political theory. With respect to the view that the practice of bioethics in certain community should incorporate religious and cultural elements, this paper attempts to expound bioethical tradition of the Malay-Muslim community in Malaysia, with shedding light on the mechanism used by the National (...)
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  46. Judith M. van der Voort, Katherina Glac & Lucas C. P. M. Meijs (2009). “Managing” Corporate Community Involvement. Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):311-329.score: 24.0
    In academic research, many attempts have been undertaken to legitimize corporate community involvement by showing a business case for it. However, much less attention has been devoted to building understanding about the actual dynamics and challenges of managing CCI in the business context. As an alternative to existing predominantly static and top-down approaches, this paper introduces a social movement framework for analyzing CCI management. Based on the analysis of qualitative case study data, we argue that the active role of (...)
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  47. David C. Thomasma (2000). A Model of Community Substituted Consent for Research on the Vulnerable. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (1):47-57.score: 24.0
    Persons of diminished capacity, especially those who are still legally competent but are de facto incompetent should still be able to participate in moderately risky research projects that benefit the class of persons with similar diseases. It is argued that this view can be supported with a modified communitarianism, a philosophy ofmedicine that holds that health care is a joint responsibility that meets foundational human needs. The mechanism for obtaining a substituted consent I call ``community consent,'' and distinguish this (...)
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  48. Ken McPhail (2003). Building a Tender Nation: Developing a Web Based Accounting and Business Ethics Community. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (1):65-74.score: 24.0
    This paper marks the launch of a new accounting and business ethics Web project called Tender Nation. The objective of the site is to provide an emotionally supportive resource and community for the discussion of accounting and business ethics issues by accounting practitioners and accounting students. The paper explains the rationale behind the development of the site and is split into five sections. Section one develops a short critique of the development of the Web and discusses the extent to (...)
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  49. Giuseppina Migliore, Giorgio Schifani, Giovanni Dara Guccione & Luigi Cembalo (2014). Food Community Networks as Leverage for Social Embeddedness. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (4):549-567.score: 24.0
    Social embeddedness, defined as the interaction of economic activities and social behavior, is used in this study as a conceptual tool to describe the growing phenomenon of food community networks (FCNs). The aim in this paper was to map the system of relations which the FCNs develop both inside and outside the network and, from the number of relations, it was inferred the influence of each FCN upon the formation of new socially embedded economic realities. A particular form of (...)
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  50. Erica L. Neely (2014). Machines and the Moral Community. Philosophy and Technology 27 (1):97-111.score: 24.0
    A key distinction in ethics is between members and nonmembers of the moral community. Over time, our notion of this community has expanded as we have moved from a rationality criterion to a sentience criterion for membership. I argue that a sentience criterion is insufficient to accommodate all members of the moral community; the true underlying criterion can be understood in terms of whether a being has interests. This may be extended to conscious, self-aware machines, as well (...)
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