Search results for 'Comparative economics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Barkley Rosser, A Critique of the New Comparative Economics.score: 180.0
    We examine the “new comparative economics” as proposed by Djankov et al. (2003) and their use of the concept of an institutional possibilities frontier. While we agree with their general argument that one must consider a variety of institutions and their respective social costs, including legal systems and cultural characteristics, when comparing the performance of different economic systems, we find various complications and difficulties with the framework they propose. We propose that a broader study of clusters of institutions (...)
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  2. Barkley Rosser, The New Traditional Economy: A New Perspective for Comparative Economics?score: 152.0
    This paper argues that a new economic system is emerging in the world economy, that of the new traditional economy. Such an economic system simultaneously seeks to have economic decision making embedded within a traditional socio-cultural framework, most frequently one associated with a traditional religion, while at the same time seeking to use modern technology and to be integrated into the modern world economy to some degree. The efforts to achieve such a system are reviewed in various parts of the (...)
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  3. J. Barkley Rosser & L. Kramer, Paradigm Lost: The Transformation of Comparative Economics.score: 150.0
    James Madison University Harrisonburg, VA 22807 USA Tel: 540-568-3212 Fax: 540-568-3010 Email: rosserjb@jmu.edu..
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  4. Barbara Ingham (1999). Comparative Perspectives in Development Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 6 (3):403-421.score: 146.0
    Comparative perspectives in development economics make extensive use of qualitative and quantitative induction together with deduction, and some-times a narrative, to bring ?facts? together in an interrelated whole. It is a method of inquiry not allied to any single ?world view? though some development economists believe that comparative perspectives (or analytical economic history) are most representative of the classical tradition in development economics. Pattern modeling which is strongly associated with the inductive approach can take account of (...)
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  5. Carla Freire (2014). Academic Misconduct Among Portuguese Economics and Business Undergraduate Students- A Comparative Analysis with Other Major Students. Journal of Academic Ethics 12 (1):43-63.score: 144.0
    The main purpose of this study is to understand the demographic, personal and situational determining factors leading to academic misconduct among undergraduate students by comparatively analyzing the differences among Economics and Business students and other major students. Two thousand four hundred ninety-two undergraduate students from different Portuguese Public Universities answered a questionnaire regarding their propensity to commit academic fraud, 640 of whom were Economics and Business students. Results concluded that Economics and Business students can be distinguished from (...)
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  6. Marion Fourcade-Gourinchas (2001). Politics, Institutional Structures, and the Rise of Economics: A Comparative Study. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 30 (3):397-447.score: 120.0
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  7. Douglas T. McGetchin Madison & Brian Wicker Burlington (2011). Economics of an Islamic Economy. By Rauf A. Azhar. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2010. Pp. Xv+ 470. Hardcover $249.00. The End of Comparative Philosophy and the Task of Comparative Thinking: Hei-Degger, Derrida, and Daoism. By Steven Burik. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2009. Pp. Vii+ 230. Price Not Given. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 61 (3):581-582.score: 120.0
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  8. John Quiggin & Robert G. Chambers (2007). Supermodularity and the Comparative Statics of Risk. Theory and Decision 62 (2):97-117.score: 84.0
    In this article, it is shown that a wide range of comparative statics results from expected utility theory can be extended to generalized expected utility models using the tools of supermodularity theory. In particular, a range of concepts of decreasing absolute risk aversion may be formulated in terms of the supermodularity properties of certainty equivalent representations of preferences.
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  9. Rodney Wilson (1997). Economics, Ethics, and Religion: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Economic Thought. New York University Press.score: 66.0
    "Written in a racy, persuasive style, the book impresses the reader as a work of significant scholarship...I encourage students of comparative religions- and especially those of Islamic economics- to read it with great care."&$151; Islamic Studies The worlds of economics and theology rarely intersect. The former appears occupied exclusively with the concrete equations of supply and demand, while the latter revolves largely around the less tangible concerns of the soul and spirit. Intended as an interfaith clarification of (...)
     
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  10. A. Comment (1990). The Conflation of Productivity and Efficiency in Economics and Economic History. Economics and Philosophy 6:147-152.score: 62.0
    In a recent article, Edward Saraydar (1989) takes economists and economic historians to task for equating productivity and efficiency in comparative economic analysis. Although I found his thesis interesting, I was a bit surprised to see selected remarks from my article on firm size in nineteenth-century France (Nye,1987) used to frame his criticism of productivity comparisons as a means of making prescriptive statements. The passages selected may mislead the reader as to the nature of my arguments. Let me quote (...)
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  11. Andrew McLaughlin (1993). Regarding Nature: Industrialism and Deep Ecology. State University of New York Press.score: 60.0
    Regarding Nature: A conceptual introduction How should we regard nature? Until recently, this question was decisively answered by the practices of ...
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  12. P. U. Patel (1974). Reflections on Marxism. S. Chand.score: 60.0
     
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  13. Ricardo F. Crespo (2007). 'Practical Comparability' and Ends in Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (3):371-393.score: 56.0
    This paper endeavours to summarize a variety of arguments for a reconsideration of ends in Economics. The logical structure of the rationality of ends (practical rationality) differs from the one of means (instrumental rationality). The paper sets out to explain the differences between both rationalities and some of the implications of incorporating this new emphasis on ends, given that Economics adopts the means rationality. The emergence of the topics of incommensurability and incomparability of ends is presented and a (...)
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  14. Esther-Mirjam Sent (1999). Economics of Science: Survey and Suggestions. Journal of Economic Methodology 6 (1):95-124.score: 56.0
    The literature of an economics of science exists in a dismal no-(wo)man's-land located somewhere between economics, history, philosophy, policy, sociology and science. Perhaps it would have continued in this tenuous quasi-existence indefinitely, were it not for a series of trends that now seem to be encouraging the institution of a subfield within the profession of economics devoted to the topic. However, many of the economists who have begun to proclaim the existence of the new subfield have generally (...)
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  15. John B. Davis (2006). Social Identity Strategies in Recent Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (3):371-390.score: 56.0
    This paper reviews three distinct strategies in recent economics for using the concept of social identity in the explanation of individual behavior: Akerlof and Kranton's neoclassical approach, Sen's commitment approach and Kirman et al.'s complexity approach. The primary focus is the multiple selves problem and the difficulties associated with failing to explain social identity and personal identity together. The argument of the paper is that too narrow a scope for reflexivity in individual decision?making renders the problem intractable, but that (...)
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  16. Edgar Kiser (1999). Comparing Varieties of Agency Theory in Economics, Political Science, and Sociology: An Illustration From State Policy Implementation. Sociological Theory 17 (2):146-170.score: 54.0
    As rational choice theory has moved from economics into political science and sociology, it has been dramatically transformed. The intellectual diffusion of agency theory illustrates this process. Agency theory is a general model of social relations involving the delegation of authority, and generally resulting in problems of control, which has been applied to a broad range of substantive contexts. This paper analyzes applications of agency theory to state policy implementation in economics, political science, and sociology. After documenting variations (...)
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  17. Hsiang-Ke Chao, Szu-Ting Chen & Roberta L. Millstein (2013). Mechanism and Causality in Biology and Economics. Springer.score: 54.0
    This volume addresses fundamental issues in the philosophy of science in the context of two most intriguing fields: biology and economics. Written by authorities and experts in the philosophy of biology and economics, Mechanism and Causality in Biology and Economics provides a structured study of the concepts of mechanism and causality in these disciplines and draws careful juxtapositions between philosophical apparatus and scientific practice. By exploring the issues that are most salient to the contemporary philosophies of biology (...)
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  18. Antonina Bakardjieva Engelbrekt (2009). 15. Toward an Institutional Approach to Comparative Economic Law? In Antonina Bakardjieva Engelbrekt (ed.), New Directions in Comparative Law. Edward Elgar.score: 52.0
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  19. Bernard W. Dempsey (1943). Comparative Economic Systems. Thought 18 (4):759-760.score: 50.0
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  20. R. Samuels (2002). A Boltho, A. Vercelli E H. Yoshikawa (a Cura di), "Comparing Economic Systems: Italy and Japan". Polis 16 (3):468-469.score: 50.0
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  21. Erich Weede (2004). Comparative Economic Development in China and Japan. Japanese Journal of Political Science 5 (1):69-90.score: 50.0
    Three hundred years ago per capita incomes in China and Japan were about equal and fairly close to the global mean. At the end of the twentieth century Japanese per capita incomes are about as high as Western incomes and about seven times as high as Chinese incomes. How could this happen? Manchu China and Tokugawa Japan did not establish equally safe property rights for merchants and producers as the West did. But political fragmentation and feudalism within Japan provided something (...)
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  22. Natalie Gold, Briony Pulford & Andrew Colman (2013). Your Money Or Your Life: Comparing Judgements In Trolley Problems Involving Economic And Emotional Harms, Injury And Death. Economics and Philosophy 29 (02):213-233.score: 48.0
    There is a long-standing debate in philosophy about whether it is morally permissible to harm one person in order to prevent a greater harm to others and, if not, what is the moral principle underlying the prohibition. Hypothetical moral dilemmas are used in order to probe moral intuitions. Philosophers use them to achieve a reflective equilibrium between intuitions and principles, psychologists to investigate moral decision-making processes. In the dilemmas, the harms that are traded off are almost always deaths. However, the (...)
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  23. Laura Pincus & Bill Shaw (1998). Comparable Worth: An Economic and Ethical Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (5):1-16.score: 48.0
    This article examines the legal, economic, and ethical arguments supporting and opposing comparable worth. The co- authors advance opposing views on the wisdom of adopting comparable worth as a public policy, and those views are not reconciled within the limits of this essay.
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  24. John Quiggin (2001). Production Under Uncertainty and Choice Under Uncertainty in the Emergence of Generalized Expected Utility Theory. Theory and Decision 51 (2/4):125-144.score: 48.0
    This paper presents a personal view of the interaction between the analysis of choice under uncertainty and the analysis of production under uncertainty. Interest in the foundations of the theory of choice under uncertainty was stimulated by applications of expected utility theory such as the Sandmo model of production under uncertainty. This interest led to the development of generalized models including rank-dependent expected utility theory. In turn, the development of generalized expected utility models raised the question of whether such models (...)
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  25. Yūichi Shionoya & Kiichirō Yagi (eds.) (2001). Competition, Trust, and Cooperation: A Comparative Study. Springer.score: 48.0
    This book is the result of the first SEEP (Studies in Economic Ethics and Philosophy) conference that was held in Asia. First, the Western tradition is reinterpreted and restated by the two editors with their diversified perspective of virtue ethics and communicative ethics. Then, new approaches such as "critical realism", "reciprocal delivery", "evolutionary thought" and "cultural studies" are applied to understand ethical problems in economics. Further, in contrast to the reassessment of Scottish moral philosophy and German Romanticism, Chinese, Japanese, (...)
     
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  26. J. E. R. Staddon (ed.) (1980). Limits to Action, the Allocation of Individual Behavior. Academic Press.score: 48.0
     
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  27. Zhang Boshu (1987). Marxism and Human Sociobiology: A Comparative Study From the Perspective of Modern Socialist Economic Reforms. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 2 (4):463-474.score: 46.0
    Modern socialist economic reforms which center on the establishment of a commodity based economic system, demand a reconsideration of human nature. Marxism and human sociobiology give different answers to questions about human nature, but neither is complete in itself. It seems timely, therefore, to suggest that a combination of biological understanding with a Marxist-based social understanding would produce a more adequate notion of human nature, thereby helping us to resolve a number of problems posed by reforms currently taking place in (...)
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  28. Philippe Mongin (2006). A Concept of Progress for Normative Economics. Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):19-54.score: 42.0
    The paper discusses the sense in which the changes undergone by normative economics in the twentieth century can be said to be progressive. A simple criterion is proposed to decide whether a sequence of normative theories is progressive. This criterion is put to use on the historical transition from the new welfare economics to social choice theory. The paper reconstructs this classic case, and eventually concludes that the latter theory was progressive compared with the former. It also briefly (...)
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  29. Robin Hanson (1995). Appendix. Comparing Peer Review and Information Prizes: A Possible Economics Experiment. Social Epistemology 9 (1):49-55.score: 42.0
    Heavy reliance is currently placed on various forms of peer review to promote the growth of basic knowledge [1]. How well do these various forms of peer review promote such growth and how well do our current institutions compare, as systems of incentives and communication, with the many alternative mechanisms used by different cultures across the centuries? Many of these alternatives, such as simple prizes, rely much less on peer review.
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  30. Philip Mirowski (1987). Shall I Compare Thee to a Minkowski-Ricardo-Leontief-Metzler Matrix of the Mosak-Hicks Type?: Or, Rhetoric, Mathematics, and the Nature of Neoclassical Economic Theory. Economics and Philosophy 3 (01):67-.score: 42.0
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  31. Francois Collet (2009). Does Habitus Matter? A Comparative Review of Bourdieu's Habitus and Simon's Bounded Rationality with Some Implications for Economic Sociology. Sociological Theory 27 (4):419 - 434.score: 42.0
    In this article, I revisit Pierre Bourdieu's concept of habitus and contrast it with Herbert Simon's notion of bounded rationality. Through a discussion of the literature of economic sociology on status and Fligstein's political-cultural approach, I argue that this concept can be a source of fresh insights into empirical problems. I find that the greater the change in the social environment, the more salient the benefits of using habitus as a tool to analyze agents' behavior.
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  32. Megan Carney (2012). Compounding Crises of Economic Recession and Food Insecurity: A Comparative Study of Three Low-Income Communities in Santa Barbara County. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 29 (2):185-201.score: 42.0
    Santa Barbara County exhibits some of the highest rates of food insecurity in California, as well as in the United States. Through ethnographic research of three low-income, predominantly Latino communities in Santa Barbara County, this study examined the degree to which households had been experiencing heightened levels of food insecurity since the economic recession and ensuing coping strategies, including gender-specific repercussions and coping strategies. Methods included administering a survey with 150 households and conducting observation and unstructured interviews at various local (...)
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  33. Long Denggao (2011). New Explorations in the Comparative Study of Economic History in China and the West. Chinese Studies in History 45 (1):7-27.score: 40.0
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  34. Y. L. Kergosien (1990). Adaptive Ramification: Comparing Models for Biological, Economical, and Conceptual Organization. Acta Biotheoretica 38 (3-4).score: 40.0
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  35. Edgar Kiser (1991). Comparing Varieties of Agency Theory in Political Science, Economics, and Sociology: An Illustration From State Policy Implementation. Sociological Theory 17:146-70.score: 40.0
     
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  36. J. William Thomas, Kyle L. Grazier & Kathleen Ward (2004). Comparing Accuracy of Risk-Adjustment Methodologies Used in Economic Profiling of Physicians. Inquiry 41 (2):218-231.score: 40.0
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  37. Philippe Mongin (2006). Value Judgements and Value Neutrality in Economics. Economica 73 (290):257-286.score: 38.0
    The paper analyses economic evaluations by distinguishing evaluative statements from actual value judgments. From this basis, it compares four solutions to the value neutrality problem in economics. After rebutting the strong theses about neutrality (normative economics is illegitimate) and non-neutrality (the social sciences are value-impregnated), the paper settles the case between the weak neutrality thesis (common in welfare economics) and a novel, weak non-neutrality thesis that extends the realm of normative economics more widely than the other (...)
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  38. Arthur Paul Pedersen (2014). Comparative Expectations. Studia Logica 102 (4):811-848.score: 38.0
    I introduce a mathematical account of expectation based on a qualitative criterion of coherence for qualitative comparisons between gambles (or random quantities). The qualitative comparisons may be interpreted as an agent’s comparative preference judgments over options or more directly as an agent’s comparative expectation judgments over random quantities. The criterion of coherence is reminiscent of de Finetti’s quantitative criterion of coherence for betting, yet it does not impose an Archimedean condition on an agent’s comparative judgments, it does (...)
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  39. Michael S. Lane & Dietrich Schaupp (1989). Ethics in Education: A Comparative Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (12):943 - 949.score: 36.0
    This study reports the results of a survey designed to assess the impact of education on the perceptions of ethical beliefs of students. The study examines the beliefs of students from selected colleges in an eastern university. The results indicate that beliefs which students perceive are required to succeed in the university differ among colleges. Business and economics students consistently perceive a greater need for unethical beliefs than students from other colleges.
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  40. John Woods (2012). Cognitive Economics and the Logic of Abduction. Review of Symbolic Logic 5 (1):148-161.score: 36.0
    An agent-centered, goal-directed, resource-bound logic of human reasoning would do well to note that individual cognitive agency is typified by the comparative scantness of available cognitive resourcess ignorance-preserving character. My principal purpose here is to tie abduction’s scarce-resource adjustment capacity to its ignorance preservation.
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  41. John H. Finch (2002). The Role of Grounded Theory in Developing Economic Theory. Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (2):213-234.score: 36.0
    Grounded theory is examined as a means of undertaking economics research that aims at theoretical development and generalization rather than testing established theories. Grounded theory encompasses a set of procedures for undertaking and analysing case studies--qualitative and quantitative--in a systematic and comparative manner. These procedures are set out, and illustrations of theory developed in close connection with business decision-making and industry competition are drawn from P.W.S. Andrews' post-Marshallian industry studies, Cyert and March's Behavioral Theory of the Firm , (...)
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  42. Tom Jones (2005). Pope and Berkeley: The Language of Poetry and Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 36.0
    The first study dedicated to the relationship between Alexander Pope and George Berkeley, this book undertakes a comparative reading of their work on the visual environment, economics and providence, challenging current ideas of the relationship between poetry and philosophy in early eighteenth-century Britain. It shows how Berkeley's idea that the phenomenal world is the language of God, learnt through custom and experience, can help to explain some of Pope's conservative sceptical arguments, and also his virtuoso poetic techniques.
     
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  43. Kenneth Leonard (2009). African Traditional Healers: Are They as Good at Economics as They Are at Medicine. In Munyaradzi Felix Murove (ed.), African Ethics: An Anthology of Comparative and Applied Ethics. University of Kwazulu-Natal Press.score: 36.0
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  44. David Dearmont & David A. Bessler (1997). A Bayesian Treatment of Duhem's Thesis: The Case of the 'Farm Problem' in Agricultural Economics. Economics and Philosophy 13 (2):149-158.score: 34.0
    In this paper we consider a Bayesian treatment of ‘Duhem's thesis’, the proposition that theories are never refuted on empirical grounds because they cannot be tested in isolation from auxiliary hypotheses about initial conditions or the operation of scientific instruments. Sawyer, Beed, and Sankey (1997) consider Duhem's thesis (and its restatement in stronger and weaker forms as the ‘Duhem-Quine thesis’) and its role in hypothesis testing, using four theories from economics and finance as examples. Here we consider Duhem's thesis (...)
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  45. Gedeon Josua Rossouw (2011). A Global Comparative Analysis of the Global Survey of Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 104 (S1):93-101.score: 34.0
    This article concludes this special issue of the Journal of Business Ethics that focussed on the Global Survey of Business Ethics as field of Training, Teaching and Research. The article provides a comparative global analysis of the findings in the eight world regions that participated in this global survey viz. Central Asia, East Asia, Europe, Latin America, North America, Oceania, South and South-East Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa. The eight regions are compared with regard to their findings on the terminology (...)
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  46. Scott R. Stroud (2013). Economic Experience as Art?: John Dewey's Lectures in China and the Problem of Mindless Occupational Labor. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (2):113-133.score: 34.0
    The American pragmatist John Dewey was no stranger to the problems of economics and their effects on the quality of work experience. Indeed, in his Democracy and Education (1916/1985), he remarks that “the greatest evil of the present regime is not found in poverty and in the suffering which it entails, but in the fact that so many persons have callings which make no appeal to them, which are pursued simply for the money reward that accrues” (MW 9:326–27). This (...)
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  47. Tommy L. Lott (2011). Comparative Aspects of Africana Philosophy and the Continental-Analytic Divide. Comparative Philosophy 2 (1).score: 34.0
    Critical engagement involving philosophers trained in continental and analytic traditions often takes its purpose to be a reconciliation of tensions arising from differences in style, or method. Critical engagement in Africana philosophy, however, is rarely focused on method, style, or orientation because philosophic research in this field, regardless of orientation, has had to accommodate its empirical grounding in disciplines outside of philosophy. I focus primarily on the comparative dimensions of three important strands of this research: (1) a history of (...)
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  48. Erwin Dekker & Paul Teule (2012). Economics Made Fun, and Made Fun Of: How 'Fun' Redefines the Domain and Identity of the Economics Profession. Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (4):427-437.score: 32.0
    This paper compares two aspects of the use of ?fun? within the economics profession. It analyzes the way in which a recently emerged genre of economics-made-fun uses fun and surprising insights to reach new audiences. And it also analyzes the way in which humor is used within and from outside the economics profession to criticize certain practices and characteristics of economists. It argues that the economics-made-fun genre, ?Freakonomics? being the prime example, not only redefines the domain (...)
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  49. Bruno S. Frey, Silke Humbert & Friedrich Schneider (2010). What is Economics? Attitudes and Views of German Economists. Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (3):317-332.score: 32.0
    Which schools of thought are favored by German economists? What makes a good economist and which economists have been most influential? These questions were addressed in a survey, conducted in the summer of 2006 among the members of the ?Verein für Socialpolitik?. An econometric analysis is used to identify to what extent ideological preferences or personal factors determine the respondents' answers. Our results suggest that German economists favor neoclassical economic theory as a school of thought and appreciate the contributions of (...)
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  50. Ralph Hertwig & Andreas Ortmann (2001). Experimental Practices in Economics: A Methodological Challenge for Psychologists? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):383-403.score: 30.0
    This target article is concerned with the implications of the surprisingly different experimental practices in economics and in areas of psychology relevant to both economists and psychologists, such as behavioral decision making. We consider four features of experimentation in economics, namely, script enactment, repeated trials, performance-based monetary payments, and the proscription against deception, and compare them to experimental practices in psychology, primarily in the area of behavioral decision making. Whereas economists bring a precisely defined “script” to experiments for (...)
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