Search results for 'Comparative economics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  12
    Barkley Rosser, A Critique of the New Comparative Economics.
    We examine the “new comparative economics” as proposed by Djankov et al. (2003) and their use of the concept of an institutional possibilities frontier. While we agree with their general argument that one must consider a variety of institutions and their respective social costs, including legal systems and cultural characteristics, when comparing the performance of different economic systems, we find various complications and difficulties with the framework they propose. We propose that a broader study of clusters of institutions (...)
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  2.  15
    Barkley Rosser, The New Traditional Economy: A New Perspective for Comparative Economics?
    This paper argues that a new economic system is emerging in the world economy, that of the new traditional economy. Such an economic system simultaneously seeks to have economic decision making embedded within a traditional socio-cultural framework, most frequently one associated with a traditional religion, while at the same time seeking to use modern technology and to be integrated into the modern world economy to some degree. The efforts to achieve such a system are reviewed in various parts of the (...)
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  3.  2
    J. Barkley Rosser & L. Kramer, Paradigm Lost: The Transformation of Comparative Economics.
    James Madison University Harrisonburg, VA 22807 USA Tel: 540-568-3212 Fax: 540-568-3010 Email: rosserjb@jmu.edu.
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  4.  6
    Barbara Ingham (1999). Comparative Perspectives in Development Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 6 (3):403-421.
    Comparative perspectives in development economics make extensive use of qualitative and quantitative induction together with deduction, and some-times a narrative, to bring ?facts? together in an interrelated whole. It is a method of inquiry not allied to any single ?world view? though some development economists believe that comparative perspectives (or analytical economic history) are most representative of the classical tradition in development economics. Pattern modeling which is strongly associated with the inductive approach can take account of (...)
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  5.  3
    Carla Freire (2014). Academic Misconduct Among Portuguese Economics and Business Undergraduate Students- A Comparative Analysis with Other Major Students. Journal of Academic Ethics 12 (1):43-63.
    The main purpose of this study is to understand the demographic, personal and situational determining factors leading to academic misconduct among undergraduate students by comparatively analyzing the differences among Economics and Business students and other major students. Two thousand four hundred ninety-two undergraduate students from different Portuguese Public Universities answered a questionnaire regarding their propensity to commit academic fraud, 640 of whom were Economics and Business students. Results concluded that Economics and Business students can be distinguished from (...)
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  6.  11
    Marion Fourcade-Gourinchas (2001). Politics, Institutional Structures, and the Rise of Economics: A Comparative Study. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 30 (3):397-447.
  7.  7
    Douglas T. McGetchin Madison & Brian Wicker Burlington (2011). Economics of an Islamic Economy. By Rauf A. Azhar. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2010. Pp. Xv+ 470. Hardcover $249.00. The End of Comparative Philosophy and the Task of Comparative Thinking: Hei-Degger, Derrida, and Daoism. By Steven Burik. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2009. Pp. Vii+ 230. Price Not Given. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 61 (3):581-582.
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  8.  9
    John Quiggin & Robert G. Chambers (2007). Supermodularity and the Comparative Statics of Risk. Theory and Decision 62 (2):97-117.
    In this article, it is shown that a wide range of comparative statics results from expected utility theory can be extended to generalized expected utility models using the tools of supermodularity theory. In particular, a range of concepts of decreasing absolute risk aversion may be formulated in terms of the supermodularity properties of certainty equivalent representations of preferences.
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  9. Rodney Wilson (1997). Economics, Ethics, and Religion: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Economic Thought. New York University Press.
    "Written in a racy, persuasive style, the book impresses the reader as a work of significant scholarship...I encourage students of comparative religions- and especially those of Islamic economics- to read it with great care."&$151; Islamic Studies The worlds of economics and theology rarely intersect. The former appears occupied exclusively with the concrete equations of supply and demand, while the latter revolves largely around the less tangible concerns of the soul and spirit. Intended as an interfaith clarification of (...)
     
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  10.  7
    Edward Saraydar (1989). The Conflation of Productivity and Efficiency in Economics and Economic History. Economics and Philosophy 5 (1):55.
    The literature of comparative economics as well as economic history is replete with references to productivity differences as reflecting relative efficiency in production. In socialist economics, for example, the longevity of the relative-productivity/relative-efficiency theme is apparent from Abram Bergson's early survey where, commenting on a productivity debate that had already been going on for over twenty years, he identified “the only issue outstanding” as the question “which is more efficient, socialism or capitalism?” The issue has continued to (...)
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  11.  38
    Andrew McLaughlin (1993). Regarding Nature: Industrialism and Deep Ecology. State University of New York Press.
    Regarding Nature: A conceptual introduction How should we regard nature? Until recently, this question was decisively answered by the practices of ...
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  12.  8
    John Vincent Nye (1990). “The Conflation of Productivity and Efficiency in Economics and Economic History”: A Comment. Economics and Philosophy 6 (1):147.
    In a recent article, Edward Saraydar takes economists and economic historians to task for equating productivity and efficiency in comparative economic analysis. Although I found his thesis interesting, I was a bit surprised to see selected remarks from my article on firm size in nineteenth-century France used to frame his criticism of productivity comparisons as a means of making prescriptive statements. The passages selected may mislead the reader as to the nature of my arguments. Let me quote Saraydar on (...)
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  13.  3
    A. Comment (1990). The Conflation of Productivity and Efficiency in Economics and Economic History. Economics and Philosophy 6:147-152.
    In a recent article, Edward Saraydar (1989) takes economists and economic historians to task for equating productivity and efficiency in comparative economic analysis. Although I found his thesis interesting, I was a bit surprised to see selected remarks from my article on firm size in nineteenth-century France (Nye,1987) used to frame his criticism of productivity comparisons as a means of making prescriptive statements. The passages selected may mislead the reader as to the nature of my arguments. Let me quote (...)
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  14. Yün-ch üan Ch en & Peter Koslowski (1997). Ching Chi Chih Hsü Li Lun Ho Lun Li Hsüeh Chung Te Pi Chiao Yen Chiu.
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  15. P. U. Patel (1974). Reflections on Marxism. S. Chand.
     
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  16. J. E. R. Staddon (ed.) (1980). Limits to Action, the Allocation of Individual Behavior. Academic Press.
     
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  17.  29
    Hsiang-Ke Chao, Szu-Ting Chen & Roberta L. Millstein (2013). Mechanism and Causality in Biology and Economics. Springer.
    This volume addresses fundamental issues in the philosophy of science in the context of two most intriguing fields: biology and economics. Written by authorities and experts in the philosophy of biology and economics, Mechanism and Causality in Biology and Economics provides a structured study of the concepts of mechanism and causality in these disciplines and draws careful juxtapositions between philosophical apparatus and scientific practice. By exploring the issues that are most salient to the contemporary philosophies of biology (...)
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  18.  5
    John B. Davis (2006). Social Identity Strategies in Recent Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (3):371-390.
    This paper reviews three distinct strategies in recent economics for using the concept of social identity in the explanation of individual behavior: Akerlof and Kranton's neoclassical approach, Sen's commitment approach and Kirman et al.'s complexity approach. The primary focus is the multiple selves problem and the difficulties associated with failing to explain social identity and personal identity together. The argument of the paper is that too narrow a scope for reflexivity in individual decision?making renders the problem intractable, but that (...)
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  19.  6
    Esther-Mirjam Sent (1999). Economics of Science: Survey and Suggestions. Journal of Economic Methodology 6 (1):95-124.
    The literature of an economics of science exists in a dismal no-(wo)man's-land located somewhere between economics, history, philosophy, policy, sociology and science. Perhaps it would have continued in this tenuous quasi-existence indefinitely, were it not for a series of trends that now seem to be encouraging the institution of a subfield within the profession of economics devoted to the topic. However, many of the economists who have begun to proclaim the existence of the new subfield have generally (...)
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  20.  5
    Davide Torsello (2013). The Perception of Corruption as Social and Institutional Pressure: A Comparative Analysis of Cultural Biases. Human Affairs 23 (2):160-173.
    This study is an empirical approach to answering the question: are there any universal factors that account for the origin, diffusion and persistence of corruption in human societies? The paper enquires whether the perception of corruption in politics and economics can be tackled as a form of cultural adaptation, driven by exogenous and endogenous forces. These are respectively: freedom of access and management of economic resources, and the pressures towards human grouping. Following the analytical insights of cultural theory, developed (...)
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  21.  1
    Giuseppe Dari-Mattiacci & Carmine Guerriero (2015). Law and Culture: A Theory of Comparative Variation in Bona Fide Purchase Rules. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 35 (3):543-574.
    A key question in comparative law is why different legal systems provide different legal solutions for the same problem. To answer this question, we use novel comparative evidence on how the conflict between the dispossessed original owner and the bona fide purchaser of a stolen good is resolved in different countries. This is the most primitive manifestation of a fundamental legal choice: the balance between the protection of the owner’s property rights and the enhancement of the buyer’s reliance (...)
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  22. Hsiang-Ke Chao (2009). Representation and Structure in Economics: The Methodology of Econometric Models of the Consumption Function. Routledge.
    This book provides a methodological perspective on understanding the essential roles of econometric models in the theory and practice. Offering a comprehensive and comparative exposition of the accounts of models in both econometrics and philosophy of science, this work shows how econometrics and philosophy of science are interconnected while exploring the methodological insight of econometric modelling that can be added to modern philosophical thought. The notion of structure is thoroughly discussed throughout the book. The studies of the consumption function (...)
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  23. Nicolai Foss & Peter Klein (2009). Austrian Economics and the Transaction Cost Approach to the Firm. Libertarian Papers 1.
    As the transaction cost theory of the firm was taking shape in the 1970s, another important movement in economics was emerging: a revival of the ‘Austrian’ tradition in economic theory associated with such economists as Ludwig von Mises and F. A. Hayek . As Oliver Williamson has pointed out, Austrian economics is among the diverse sources for transaction cost economics. In particular, Williamson frequently cites Hayek , particularly Hayek’s emphasis on adaptation as a key problem of economic (...)
     
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  24.  32
    John Quiggin (2001). Production Under Uncertainty and Choice Under Uncertainty in the Emergence of Generalized Expected Utility Theory. Theory and Decision 51 (2/4):125-144.
    This paper presents a personal view of the interaction between the analysis of choice under uncertainty and the analysis of production under uncertainty. Interest in the foundations of the theory of choice under uncertainty was stimulated by applications of expected utility theory such as the Sandmo model of production under uncertainty. This interest led to the development of generalized models including rank-dependent expected utility theory. In turn, the development of generalized expected utility models raised the question of whether such models (...)
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  25. Yūichi Shionoya & Kiichirō Yagi (eds.) (2001). Competition, Trust, and Cooperation: A Comparative Study. Springer.
    This book is the result of the first SEEP (Studies in Economic Ethics and Philosophy) conference that was held in Asia. First, the Western tradition is reinterpreted and restated by the two editors with their diversified perspective of virtue ethics and communicative ethics. Then, new approaches such as "critical realism", "reciprocal delivery", "evolutionary thought" and "cultural studies" are applied to understand ethical problems in economics. Further, in contrast to the reassessment of Scottish moral philosophy and German Romanticism, Chinese, Japanese, (...)
     
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  26.  8
    Christopher C. Robinson (2009). Hub Zwart, Understanding Nature: Case Studies in Comparative Epistemology. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (5):489-492.
  27.  15
    Michael S. Lane & Dietrich Schaupp (1989). Ethics in Education: A Comparative Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (12):943 - 949.
    This study reports the results of a survey designed to assess the impact of education on the perceptions of ethical beliefs of students. The study examines the beliefs of students from selected colleges in an eastern university. The results indicate that beliefs which students perceive are required to succeed in the university differ among colleges. Business and economics students consistently perceive a greater need for unethical beliefs than students from other colleges.
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  28.  5
    John Woods (2012). Cognitive Economics and the Logic of Abduction. Review of Symbolic Logic 5 (1):148-161.
    An agent-centered, goal-directed, resource-bound logic of human reasoning would do well to note that individual cognitive agency is typified by the comparative scantness of available cognitive resourcess ignorance-preserving character. My principal purpose here is to tie abduction’s scarce-resource adjustment capacity to its ignorance preservation.
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  29.  5
    Giacomo Borbone & Krzysztof Brzechczyn (eds.) (2016). Idealization Xiv: Models in Science. Brill | Rodopi.
    The book "Idealization XIV: Models in Science" offers a detailed ontological, epistemological and historical account of the role of models in scientific practice. The volume contains contributions of different international scholars who developed many aspects of the use of idealizations and models both in the natural and the social sciences. This volume is particularly relevant because it offers original contributions concerning one of the main topic in philosophy of science: the role of models in such branches of the sciences and (...)
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  30. Tom Jones (2005). Pope and Berkeley: The Language of Poetry and Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The first study dedicated to the relationship between Alexander Pope and George Berkeley, this book undertakes a comparative reading of their work on the visual environment, economics and providence, challenging current ideas of the relationship between poetry and philosophy in early eighteenth-century Britain. It shows how Berkeley's idea that the phenomenal world is the language of God, learnt through custom and experience, can help to explain some of Pope's conservative sceptical arguments, and also his virtuoso poetic techniques.
     
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  31. Kenneth Leonard (2009). African Traditional Healers: Are They as Good at Economics as They Are at Medicine. In Munyaradzi Felix Murove (ed.), African Ethics: An Anthology of Comparative and Applied Ethics. University of Kwazulu-Natal Press
     
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  32.  8
    Simon Deakin, David Gindis, Geoffrey M. Hodgson, Kainan Huang & Katharina Pistor (forthcoming). Legal Institutionalism: Capitalism and the Constitutive Role of Law. Journal of Comparative Economics.
    Social scientists have paid insufficient attention to the role of law in constituting the economic institutions of capitalism. Part of this neglect emanates from inadequate conceptions of the nature of law itself. Spontaneous conceptions of law and property rights that downplay the role of the state are criticized here, because they typically assume relatively small numbers of agents and underplay the complexity and uncertainty in developed capitalist systems. In developed capitalist economies, law is sustained through interaction between private agents, courts (...)
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  33.  6
    Simon Deakin, David Gindis, Geoffrey M. Hodgson, Kainan Huang & Katharina Pistor (forthcoming). Legal Institutionalism: Capitalism and the Constitutive Role of Law. Journal of Comparative Economics.
    Social scientists have paid insufficient attention to the role of law in constituting the economic institutions of capitalism. Part of this neglect emanates from inadequate conceptions of the nature of law itself. Spontaneous conceptions of law and property rights that downplay the role of the state are criticized here, because they typically assume relatively small numbers of agents and underplay the complexity and uncertainty in developed capitalist systems. In developed capitalist economies, law is sustained through interaction between private agents, courts (...)
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  34. Christopher Bliss (2007). Trade, Growth, and Inequality. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Combining the fields of international trade theory, economic development, and economic growth, this text provides an advanced exposition suitable for graduate students as well as researchers at all levels. It combines mathematical rigour with an exceptional breadth of approaches, including institutions, history, and comparative economics. Existing research is exposited and evaluated, and numerous new results are included. The central themes of economic inequality, within and between nations, are discussed, as is convergence, or the reduction of inequality. Distinctive features (...)
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  35. Christopher Clarke (forthcoming). Preferences and Positivist Methodology in Economics. Philosophy of Science.
    I distinguish several doctrines that economic methodologists have found attractive, all of which have a positivist flavour. One of these is the doctrine that preference assignments in economics are just shorthand descriptions of agents' choice behaviour. Although most of these doctrines are problematic, the latter doctrine about preference assignments is a respectable one, I argue. It doesn't entail any of the problematic doctrines, and indeed it is warranted independently of them.
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  36.  62
    D. Wade Hands (2013). Mark Blaug on the Normativity of Welfare Economics. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 6:1-25.
    Abstract: This paper examines Mark Blaug's position on the normative character of Paretian welfare economics: in general, and specifically with respect to his debate with Pieter Hennipman over this question during the 1990s. The paper also clarifies some of the confusions that emerged within the context of this debate, and closes by providing some additional arguments supporting Blaug's position that he himself did not provide.
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  37.  38
    Anna Alexandrova & Robert Northcott (2009). Progress in Economics: Lessons From the Spectrum Auctions. In Harold Kincaid & Don Ross (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Economics. Oxford University Press 306--337.
    The 1994 US spectrum auction is now a paradigmatic case of the successful use of microeconomic theory for policy-making. We use a detailed analysis of it to review standard accounts in philosophy of science of how idealized models are connected to messy reality. We show that in order to understand what made the design of the spectrum auction successful, a new such account is required, and we present it here. Of especial interest is the light this sheds on the issue (...)
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  38.  41
    Ralph Weber (2014). Comparative Philosophy and the Tertium: Comparing What with What, and in What Respect? Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):151-171.
    Comparison is fundamental to the practice and subject-matter of philosophy, but has received scant attention by philosophers. This is even so in “comparative philosophy,” which literally distinguishes itself from other philosophy by being “comparative.” In this article, the need for a philosophy of comparison is suggested. What we compare with what, and in what respect it is done, poses a series of intriguing and intricate questions. In Part One, I offer a problematization of the tertium comparationis (the third (...)
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  39.  73
    Christine Clavien & Rebekka A. Klein (2010). Eager for Fairness or for Revenge? Psychological Altruism in Economics. Economics and Philosophy 26 (3):267-290.
    To understand the human capacity for psychological altruism, one requires a proper understanding of how people actually think and feel. This paper addresses the possible relevance of recent findings in experimental economics and neuroeconomics to the philosophical controversy over altruism and egoism. After briefly sketching and contextualizing the controversy, we survey and discuss the results of various studies on behaviourally altruistic helping and punishing behaviour, which provide stimulating clues for the debate over psychological altruism. On closer analysis, these studies (...)
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  40. Philippe Mongin (2006). A Concept of Progress for Normative Economics. Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):19-54.
    The paper discusses the sense in which the changes undergone by normative economics in the twentieth century can be said to be progressive. A simple criterion is proposed to decide whether a sequence of normative theories is progressive. This criterion is put to use on the historical transition from the new welfare economics to social choice theory. The paper reconstructs this classic case, and eventually concludes that the latter theory was progressive compared with the former. It also briefly (...)
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  41.  14
    D. Wade Hands (2012). Realism, Commonsensibles, and Economics:The Case of Contemporary Revealed Preference Theory. In Aki Lehtinen, Jaakko Kuorikoski & Petri Ylikoski (eds.), Economics for Real: Uskali Mäki and the Place of Truth in Economics. Routledge 156-178.
    This paper challenges Mäki's argument about commonsensibles by offering a case study from contemporary microeconomics – contemporary revealed preference theory (hereafter CRPT) – where terms like "preference," "utility," and to some extent "choice," are radical departures from the common sense meanings of these terms. Although the argument challenges the claim that economics is inhabited solely by commonsensibles, it is not inconsistent with such folk notions being common in economic theory.
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  42.  17
    Lin Ma & Jaap van Brakel (2013). On the Conditions of Possibility for Comparative and Intercultural Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (3):297-312.
    In this essay, we present a theory of intercultural philosophical dialogue and comparative philosophy, drawing on both hermeneutics and analytic philosophy. We advocate the approach of “de-essentialization” across the board. It is true that similarities and differences are always to be observed across languages and traditions, but there exist no immutable cores or essences. “De-essentialization” applies to all “levels” of concepts: everyday notions such as green and qing 青, philosophical concepts such as emotion(s) and qing 情, and philosophical categories (...)
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  43. Toby Handfield (2015). Essentially Comparative Value Does Not Threaten Transitivity. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):3-12.
    The essentially comparative conception of value entails that the value of a state of affairs does not depend solely upon features intrinsic to the state of affairs, but also upon extrinsic features, such as the set of feasible alternatives. It has been argued that this conception of value gives us reason to abandon the transitivity of the better than relation. This paper shows that the support for intransitivity derived from this conception of value is very limited. On its most (...)
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  44.  14
    Bo Mou (2010). On Constructive-Engagement Strategy of Comparative Philosophy: A Journal Theme Introduction [Abstract]. Comparative Philosophy 1 (1):1-32.
    In this journal theme introduction, first, I explain how comparative philosophy as explored in the journal Comparative Philosophy is understood and how it is intrinsically related to the constructive engagement strategy. Second, to characterize more clearly and accurately some related methodological points of the constructive-engagement strategy, and also to explain how constructive engagement is possible, I introduce some needed conceptual and explanatory resources and a meta-methodological framework and endeavor to identify adequacy conditions for methodological guiding principles in (...) studies. Third, as a case analysis, I show how the constructive-engagement reflective practice bears on recent studies of Chinese and comparative Chinese-Western philosophy, especially in the past decade, for two purposes: to illustrate the foregoing theoretic characterization of the constructive engagement strategy, and to identify and explain some constructive morals that might have general significance for comparative studies. (shrink)
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  45.  8
    Megan Blomfield (2012). Ethics in Economics: Lessons From Human Subjects Research. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 5 (1):24-44.
    Many economists, it is said, “are inclined to deny that moral philosophy has anything to do with economics” . In this paper I challenge such inclinations bydrawing an analogy between economic interventions and humansubjects research. It is undeniable that investigators engaged in thelatter should adhere to specific ethical principles. I argue that analogousfeatures of economic interventions should lead us to recognise thatsimilar ethical concerns actually arise in both activities, and thusthat economic interventions should also be conducted in accordancewith ethical (...)
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  46.  17
    Stephen C. Angle (2010). The Minimal Definition and Methodology of Comparative Philosophy: A Report From a Conference [Abstract]. Comparative Philosophy 1 (1):106.
    In June of 2008, the International Society for Comparative Studies of Chinese and Western Philosophy (ISCWP) convened its third Constructive Engagement conference, on the theme of “Comparative Philosophy Methodology.” During the opening speeches, Prof. Dunhua ZHAO, Chair of the Philosophy Department at Peking University, challenged the conference’s participants to put forward a minimal definition of “comparative philosophy” and a statement of its methods. Based on the papers from the conference and the extensive discussion that ensued, during my (...)
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  47.  15
    Barry Smith (1994). The Philosophy of Austrian Economics. [REVIEW] Review of Austrian Economics 7:127–132.
    Review of David Gordon, The Philosophical Origins of Austrian Economics.
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  48.  38
    Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.) (2003). Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge.
    Feminist economists have demonstrated that interrogating hierarchies based on gender, ethnicity, class and nation results in an economics that is biased and more faithful to empirical evidence than are mainstream accounts. This rigorous and comprehensive book examines many of the central philosophical questions and themes in feminist economics including: · History of economics · Feminist science studies · Identity and agency · Caring labor · Postcolonialism and postmodernism With contributions from such leading figures as Nancy Folbre, Julie (...)
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  49.  52
    Tony Lawson (1997). Economics and Reality. Routledge.
    There is an increasingly widespread belief, both within and outside the discipline, that modern economics is irrelevant to the understanding of the real world. Economics and Reality traces this irrelevance to the failure of economists to match their methods with their subject, showing that formal, mathematical models are unsuitable to the social realities economists purport to address. Tony Lawson examines the various ways in which mainstream economics is rooted in positivist philosophy and examines the problems this causes. (...)
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  50. J. Smith, W. Shields & D. Washburn (2003). The Comparative Psychology of Uncertainty Monitoring and Metacognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):317-339.
    Researchers have begun to explore animals' capacities for uncertainty monitoring and metacognition. This exploration could extend the study of animal self-awareness and establish the relationship of self-awareness to other-awareness. It could sharpen descriptions of metacognition in the human literature and suggest the earliest roots of metacognition in human development. We summarize research on uncertainty monitoring by humans, monkeys, and a dolphin within perceptual and metamemory tasks. We extend phylogenetically the search for metacognitive capacities by considering studies that have tested less (...)
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