Search results for 'Compulsion' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  84
    James Beebe (2013). Weakness of Will, Reasonability, and Compulsion. Synthese 190 (18):4077-4093.
    Experimental philosophers have recently begun to investigate the folk conception of weakness of will (e.g., Mele in Philos Stud 150:391–404, 2010; May and Holton in Philos Stud 157:341–360, 2012; Beebe forthcoming; Sousa and Mauro forthcoming). Their work has focused primarily on the ways in which akrasia (i.e., acting contrary to one’s better judgment), unreasonable violations of resolutions, and variations in the moral valence of actions modulate folk attributions of weakness of will. A key finding that has emerged from this research (...)
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  2.  56
    Robert N. Audi (1974). Moral Responsibility, Freedom, and Compulsion. American Philosophical Quarterly 11 (January):1-14.
    This paper sets out and defends an account of free action and explores the relation between free action and moral responsibility. Free action is analyzed as a certain kind of uncompelled action. The notion of compulsion is explicated in detail, And several forms of compulsion are distinguished and compared. It is argued that contrary to what is usually supposed, A person may be morally responsible for doing something even if he did not do it freely. On the basis (...)
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  3. Ezio Di Nucci (2013). Addiction, Compulsion, and Agency. Neuroethics (1):1-3.
    I show that Pickard’s argument against the irresistibility of addiction fails because her proposed dilemma, according to which either drug-seeking does not count as action or addiction is resistible, is flawed; and that is the case whether or not one endorses Pickard’s controversial definition of action. Briefly, we can easily imagine cases in which drug-seeking meets Pickard’s conditions for agency without thereby implying that the addiction was not irresistible, as when the drug addict may take more than one route to (...)
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  4. Edmund Henden, Hans Olav Melberg & Ole Rogeberg (2013). Addiction: Choice or Compulsion? Frontiers in Addictive Disorders and Behavioral Dyscontrol 4 (77):11.
    Normative thinking about addiction has traditionally been divided between, on the one hand, a medical model which sees addiction as a disease characterized by compulsive and relapsing drug use over which the addict has little or no control and, on the other, a moral model which sees addiction as a choice characterized by voluntary behaviour under the control of the addict. Proponents of the former appeal to evidence showing that regular consumption of drugs causes persistent changes in the brain structures (...)
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  5.  97
    Cesare Cozzo (2014). Inference and Compulsion. In E. Moriconi (ed.), Second Pisa Colloquium in Logic,Language and Epistemology. ETS 162-180.
    What is an inference? Logicians and philosophers have proposed various conceptions of inference. I shall first highlight seven features that contribute to distinguish these conceptions. I shall then compare three conceptions to see which of them best explains the special force that compels us to accept the conclusion of an inference, if we accept its premises.
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  6.  17
    Louis Charland (2012). The Varieties of Compulsion in Addiction. AJOB Neuroscience 3 (2):50-51.
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  7. Bill Brewer (1995). Mental Causation: Compulsion by Reason. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 69 (69):237-253.
    The standard paradigm for mental causation is a person’s acting for a reason. Something happens - she intentionally φ’s - the occurrence of which we explain by citing a relevant belief or desire. In the present context, I simply take for granted the following two conditions on the appropriateness of this explanation. First, the agent φ’s _because_ she believes/desires what we say she does, where this is expressive of a _causal_ dependence.1 Second, her believing/desiring this gives her a _reason_ for (...)
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  8.  37
    Christopher Buckels (2013). Compulsion to Rule in Plato's Republic. Apeiron 46 (1):63-84.
    Three problems threaten any account of philosophical rule in the Republic. First, Socrates is supposed to show that acting justly is always beneficial, but instead he extols the benefits of having a just soul. He leaves little reason to believe practical justice and psychic justice are connected and thus to believe that philosophers will act justly. In response to this problem, I show that just acts produce just souls. Since philosophers want to have just souls, they will act justly. Second, (...)
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  9.  45
    J. Wilson (1958). Freedom and Compulsion. Mind 67 (January):60-69.
  10.  25
    Paul Russell (1988). Causation, Compulsion, and Compatibilism. American Philosophical Quarterly 25 (October):313-321.
  11. William Ferraiolo (2004). Against Compatibilism: Compulsion, Free Agency and Moral Responsibility. Sorites 15 (December):67-72.
    Free agency and moral responsibility are incompatible with causal determinism because causal determinism, properly understood, entails that originating conditions beyond the agent's control ultimately compel all human choices and actions. If causal determinism is true, then causal antecedents and laws of nature nomologically necessitate all deliberation, choice and action. If conditions beyond the agent's control ultimately compel the agent's behaviors, then the agent is not free and is not morally responsible. Compatibilists claim that externally compelled acts are not free, but (...)
     
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  12.  12
    Lennart Nordenfelt (2007). Rationality and Compulsion: Applying Action Theory to Psychiatry. OUP Oxford.
    This book presents a unique examination of mental illness. Though common to many mental disorders, delusions result in actions that, though perhaps rational to the individual, might seem entirely inappropriate or harmful to others. This book shows how we may better understand delusion by examining the nature of compulsion.
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  13. Robert Kowalski (2005). On Terrorism and the Politics of Compulsion. World Futures 61 (3):188 – 198.
    The concept of "terrorism" is problematized and argued to be at one end of a continuum of behavior that can be characterized as "compulsion." This approach to conflict is explained in terms of Transactional Analysis and the inadequacy of compulsion as a means of managing human affairs (politics) is explored in relation to the use of power that it requires, and to the responses it generates. An alternative behavior, based on "turning the other cheek" and Satyagraha (confronting), is (...)
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  14.  6
    Albino Barrera (2005). Economic Compulsion and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Markets can often be harsh in compelling people to make unpalatable economic choices any reasonable person would not take under normal conditions. Thus workers laid off in mid-career accept lower paid jobs that are beneath their professional experience for want of better alternatives. Economic migrants leave their families and cross borders (legally or illegally) in search of a livelihood and countless Third World families rely on child labor to supplement meagre household incomes. These are examples of economic compulsion, an (...)
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  15. Jenann Ismael (2007). Freedom, Compulsion, and Causation. Psyche 13.
    The intuitive notion of cause carries with it the idea of compulsion. When we learn that the dynamical laws are deterministic, we give this a causal reading and imagine our actions compelled to occur by conditions laid down at the beginning of the universe. Hume famously argued that this idea of compulsion is borrowed from experience and illegitimately projected onto regularities in the world. Exploiting the interventionist analysis of causal relations, together with an insight about the degeneracy of (...)
     
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  16.  23
    Christopher Bobonich (1991). Persuasion, Compulsion and Freedom in Plato's Laws. Classical Quarterly 41 (02):365-.
    One of the distinctions that Plato in the Laws stresses most heavily in his discussion of the proper relation between the individual citizen and the laws of the city is that between persuasion and compulsion. Law, Plato believes, should try to persuade rather than compel the citizens. Near the end of the fourth book of the Laws, the Athenian Stranger, Plato's spokesman in this dialogue, asks whether the lawgiver for their new city of Magnesia should in making laws ‘explain (...)
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  17. Megan Wallace, Compulsion, Love and the Willingness to Rule.
    We are told in Book I (347b-d) of The Republic that good people will not be willing to rule for money or honor. On the contrary, they will have to be coerced, by some compulsion or punishment, to rule. Moreover, in a city full of good men, there will be a competition to see who will be the ones not to rule. So a good or ‘true’ ruler will be one who does not necessarily want to rule. Even stronger: (...)
     
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  18.  9
    Malcolm Tight (1998). Lifelong Learning: Opportunity or Compulsion? British Journal of Educational Studies 46 (3):251 - 263.
    Lifelong learning is presented as a means for enabling individuals, organisations and nations to meet the challenges of an increasingly competitive world. It suggests an extension of opportunity,involving all adults, whatever their interests or experience. There is also, however, a strong sense of expectation, even compulsion, with emphasis given to vocational forms of study and participation.
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  19. Celia T. Bardwell-Jones (2013). Persuasion and Compulsion in the Classroom1. In Jacquelyn Kegley & Krzyszof Piotr Skowronski (eds.), Persuasion and Compulsion in Democracy. Lexington 231.
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  20. Judith M. Green (2013). Persuasion and Compulsion in Democracy. In Jacquelyn Kegley & Krzyszof Piotr Skowronski (eds.), Persuasion and Compulsion in Democracy. Lexington 173.
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  21. Jacquelyn Kegley & Krzysztof Piotr Skowronski (eds.) (2015). Persuasion and Compulsion in Democracy. Lexington Books.
    The book presents a variety of philosophical and socio-political perspectives related to the relationship between persuasion and compulsion in democracy. It meets the need of the present time, in America and in Europe, to re-read and discuss the basic assumptions of democracy and the role of individual within it in the context of institutional persuasions that can become factual compulsions for other institution and, first of all, individuals.
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  22. Jakub Wyborski (2013). The Forlorn Hope of Freedom and Rational Persuasion Beyond Compulsion—A Pragmatist View. In Jacquelyn Kegley & Krzyszof Piotr Skowronski (eds.), Persuasion and Compulsion in Democracy. Lexington 107.
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  23. Michael Smith (2003). Rational Capacities, Or: How to Distinguish Recklessness, Weakness, and Compulsion. In Sarah Stroud & Christine Tappolet (eds.), Weakness of Will and Practical Irrationality. Oxford: Clarendon Press 17-38.
  24. William M. Salter (1899). Does Political Compulsion Need to Be Justified? International Journal of Ethics 10 (1):97-98.
  25.  8
    Severin Schroeder, Intuition, Decision, Compulsion.
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  26.  53
    Richard Holton & Kent Berridge (forthcoming). Addiction Between Compulsion and Choice. In Neil Levy (ed.), Addiction and Self-Control. Oxford University Press
    We aim to find a middle path between disease models of addiction, and those that treat addictive choices as choices like any other. We develop an account of the disease element by focussing on the idea that dopamine works primarily to lay down dispositional intrinsic desires. Addictive substances artifically boost the dopamine signal, and thereby lay down intrinsic desires for the substances that persist through withdrawal, and in the face of beliefs that they are worthless. The result is (...)
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  27. Eric Brown (2000). Justice and Compulsion for Plato's Philosopher–Rulers. Ancient Philosophy 20 (1):1-17.
  28. Robert Heinaman (1988). Compulsion and Voluntary Action in the Eudemian Ethics. Noûs 22 (2):253-281.
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  29. Gary Watson (1999). Disordered Appetites: Addiction, Compulsion and Dependence. In Jon Elster (ed.), Addiction: Entries and Exits. Russell Sage Publications
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  30.  63
    Charles S. Chihara (1961). Wittgenstein and Logical Compulsion. Analysis 21 (6):136 - 140.
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  31.  29
    Gerald B. Dworkin (1968). Compulsion and Moral Concepts. Ethics 78 (3):227-233.
  32. Larry Gostin & William J. Curran (1986). The Limits of Compulsion in Controlling AIDS. Hastings Center Report 16 (6):24-29.
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  33. Jody Azzouni (2008). The Compulsion to Believe: Logical Inference and Normativity. Protosociology 25:69-88.
    The interaction between intuitions about inference, and the normative constraints that logical principles applied to mechanically-recognizable derivations impose on inference, is explored. These intuitions are evaluated in a clear testcase: informal mathematical proof. It is argued that formal derivations are not the source of our intuitions of validity, and indeed, neither is the semantic recognition of validity, either as construed model-theoretically, or as driven by the subject-matter such inferences are directed towards. Rather, psychologically-engrained inference-packages are the source of our sense (...)
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  34.  44
    Ferenc Huoranszki (2011). Weakness and Compulsion: The Essential Difference. Philosophical Explorations 14 (1):81-97.
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  35.  42
    A. J. Cronin & J. Harris (2010). Authorisation, Altruism and Compulsion in the Organ Donation Debate. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (10):627-631.
    The report from the Organ Donation Taskforce looking at the potential impact of an opt-out system for deceased donor organ donation in the UK, published in November 2008, is probably the most comprehensive and systematic inquiry to date into the issues and considerations which might affect the availability of deceased donor organs for clinical transplantation. By the end of a thorough and transparent process, a clear consensus was reached. The taskforce rejected the idea of an opt-out system. In this article (...)
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  36. Andrea L. Bonnicksen (1997). Fetal Motherhood: Toward a Compulsion to Generate Lives? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (1):19-30.
    A scientist at Edinburgh University announced in 1994 that he had removed ovaries from, mouse fetuses and transplanted them, to adult mice. The ovaries released eggs, and conceptions occurred. Although this was not the first such attempt with mice, the study attracted attention because the researcher suggested, that fetal to adult ovarian transplants were a theoretical possibility for humans. If aborted, fetuses were used, as egg sources in assisted conception, a new entity would arise: the never-born genetic mother. Using eggs (...)
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  37.  45
    Donald C. Williams (1953). Remarks on Causation and Compulsion. Journal of Philosophy 50 (4):120-124.
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  38. Bill Brewer (1995). Compulsion by Reason (Mental Causation II). Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 69:237-53.
  39.  13
    Roberta Tucker (2004). Disorientation, Reorientation, A Compulsion to Explain. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (5-6):5-6.
    The articles in this issue attempt to better understand the specific relationship between literature and the workings of the brain/mind. It includes articles from a literary scholar and poet who examines the neurological basis of writing poetry, and from four literary scholars: one who looks at the relation between some specific poetic techniques and the functioning of certain processing systems in the brain, one who examines how bodily systems outside the brain are enlisted in the reading experience, one who uses (...)
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  40.  6
    Joseph W. Little (1992). Ethics, Political Beliefs & Governmental Compulsion. Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 1 (1-2):101-117.
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  41. Conrad Lodziak (1988). Dull Compulsion of the Economic: The Dominant Ideology and Social Reproduction. Radical Philosophy 44:10-17.
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  42.  11
    Kenneth A. Taylor (2000). What in Nature is the Compulsion of Reason? Synthese 122 (1-2):209 - 244.
    If reason is a real causal force,operative in some, but not all ofour cognition and conation, then itought to be possible to tell anaturalistic story that distinguishes themind which is moved byreason from the mind which is movedby forces other than reason.This essay proposes some steps towardthat end. I proceed by showingthat it is possible to reconcile certainemerging psychological ideasabout the causal powers of themind/brain with a venerablephilosophical vision of reason as the facultyof norms. My accountof reason is psychologistic, social, (...)
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  43.  20
    Robert Wachbroit (1987). Logical Compulsion and Necessity. Erkenntnis 26 (1):45 - 56.
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  44.  5
    Lennart Nordenfelt (2009). The Nature of Vital Goals: Comment on Andrew Bloodworth's Review of Rationality and Compulsion. Health Care Analysis 17 (1):92-94.
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  45.  5
    Richard Jenkyns (2008). A Compulsion for Antiquity: Freud and the Ancient World. Common Knowledge 14 (2):319-319.
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  46.  34
    Jonathan Y. Tsou (2009). Rationality and Compulsion: Applying Action Theory to Psychiatry – by Lennart Nordenfelt. [REVIEW] Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (4):415-418.
  47.  22
    Michael J. Sweeney (2007). Philosophy and Jihād: Al-Fārābī on Compulsion to Happiness. Review of Metaphysics 60 (3):543-572.
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  48.  8
    Bertrand P. Helm (1972). Santayana: The Temporal Compulsion. Southern Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):207-217.
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  49. Malcom Tight (1998). Lifelong Learning: Opportunity or Compulsion? British Journal of Educational Studies 46 (3):251-263.
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  50.  16
    Dwight Furrow (1998). Schindler's Compulsion: An Essay on Practical Necessity. American Philosophical Quarterly 35 (3):209 - 229.
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