Search results for 'Computational Theory' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Bartlomiej Swiatczak (2011). Conscious Representations: An Intractable Problem for the Computational Theory of Mind. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 21 (1):19-32.score: 240.0
    Advocates of the computational theory of mind claim that the mind is a computer whose operations can be implemented by various computational systems. According to these philosophers, the mind is multiply realisable because—as they claim—thinking involves the manipulation of syntactically structured mental representations. Since syntactically structured representations can be made of different kinds of material while performing the same calculation, mental processes can also be implemented by different kinds of material. From this perspective, consciousness plays a minor (...)
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  2. Jon Cogburn & Jason Megill (2010). Are Turing Machines Platonists? Inferentialism and the Computational Theory of Mind. Minds and Machines 20 (3):423-439.score: 240.0
    We first discuss Michael Dummett’s philosophy of mathematics and Robert Brandom’s philosophy of language to demonstrate that inferentialism entails the falsity of Church’s Thesis and, as a consequence, the Computational Theory of Mind. This amounts to an entirely novel critique of mechanism in the philosophy of mind, one we show to have tremendous advantages over the traditional Lucas-Penrose argument.
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  3. Gualtiero Piccinini & Sonya Bahar (2013). Neural Computation and the Computational Theory of Cognition. Cognitive Science 37 (3):453-488.score: 236.0
    We begin by distinguishing computationalism from a number of other theses that are sometimes conflated with it. We also distinguish between several important kinds of computation: computation in a generic sense, digital computation, and analog computation. Then, we defend a weak version of computationalism—neural processes are computations in the generic sense. After that, we reject on empirical grounds the common assimilation of neural computation to either analog or digital computation, concluding that neural computation is sui generis. Analog computation requires continuous (...)
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  4. Louis C. Charland (1995). Feeling and Representing: Computational Theory and the Modularity of Affect. Synthese 105 (3):273-301.score: 192.0
    In this paper I review some leading developments in the empirical theory of affect. I argue that (1) affect is a distinct perceptual representation governed system, and (2) that there are significant modular factors in affect. The paper concludes with the observation thatfeeler (affective perceptual system) may be a natural kind within cognitive science. The main purpose of the paper is to explore some hitherto unappreciated connections between the theory of affect and the computational theory of (...)
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  5. Gualtiero Piccinini (2004). The First Computational Theory of Mind and Brain: A Close Look at McCulloch and Pitts' Logical Calculus of Ideas Immanent in Nervous Activity. Synthese 141 (2):175-215.score: 192.0
    Despite its significance in neuroscience and computation, McCulloch and Pitts's celebrated 1943 paper has received little historical and philosophical attention. In 1943 there already existed a lively community of biophysicists doing mathematical work on neural networks. What was novel in McCulloch and Pitts's paper was their use of logic and computation to understand neural, and thus mental, activity. McCulloch and Pitts's contributions included (i) a formalism whose refinement and generalization led to the notion of finite automata (an important formalism in (...)
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  6. Martin V. Butz Oliver Herbort (2012). Too Good to Be True? Ideomotor Theory From a Computational Perspective. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 192.0
    In recent years, Ideomotor Theory has regained widespread attention and sparked the development of a number of theories on goal-directed behavior and learning. However, there are two issues with previous studies’ use of Ideomotor Theory. Although Ideomotor Theory is seen as very general, it is often studied in settings that are considerably more simplistic than most natural situations. Moreover, Ideomotor Theory’s claim that effect anticipations directly trigger actions and that action-effect learning is based on the formation (...)
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  7. Jeffrey Hershfield (2005). Is There Life After the Death of the Computational Theory of Mind? Minds and Machines 15 (2):183-194.score: 184.0
    In this paper, I explore the implications of Fodor’s attacks on the Computational Theory of Mind (CTM), which get their most recent airing in The Mind Doesn’t Work That Way. I argue that if Fodor is right that the CTM founders on the global nature of abductive inference, then several of the philosophical views about the mind that he has championed over the years founder as well. I focus on Fodor’s accounts of mental causation, psychological explanation, and intentionality.
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  8. Steven Horst (1999). Symbols and Computation: A Critique of the Computational Theory of Mind. Minds and Machines 9 (3):347-381.score: 184.0
    Over the past several decades, the philosophical community has witnessed the emergence of an important new paradigm for understanding the mind.1 The paradigm is that of machine computation, and its influence has been felt not only in philosophy, but also in all of the empirical disciplines devoted to the study of cognition. Of the several strategies for applying the resources provided by computer and cognitive science to the philosophy of mind, the one that has gained the most attention from philosophers (...)
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  9. Laura Sizer (2000). Towards a Computational Theory of Mood. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (4):743-770.score: 184.0
    Moods have global and profound effects on our thoughts, motivations and behavior. To understand human behavior and cognition fully, we must understand moods. In this paper I critically examine and reject the methodology of conventional ?cognitive theories? of affect. I lay the foundations of a new theory of moods that identifies them with processes of our cognitive functional architecture. Moods differ fundamentally from some of our other affective states and hence require distinct explanatory tools. The computational theory (...)
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  10. Marcin Milkowski, Computational Theory of Mind. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 184.0
    The Computational Theory of Mind The Computational Theory of Mind (CTM) claims that the mind is a computer, so the theory is also known as computationalism. It is generally assumed that CTM is the main working hypothesis of cognitive science. CTM is often understood as a specific variant of the Representational Theory of Mind (RTM), […].
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  11. William J. Rapaport & Michael W. Kibby (2002). Contextual Vocabulary Acquisition: A Computational Theory and Educational Curriculum. In Nagib Callaos, Ana Breda & Ma Yolanda Fernandez J. (eds.), Proceedings of the 6th World Multiconference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics. International Institute of Informatics and Systemics.score: 180.0
    We discuss a research project that develops and applies algorithms for computational contextual vocabulary acquisition (CVA): learning the meaning of unknown words from context. We try to unify a disparate literature on the topic of CVA from psychology, first- and secondlanguage acquisition, and reading science, in order to help develop these algorithms: We use the knowledge gained from the computational CVA system to build an educational curriculum for enhancing students’ abilities to use CVA strategies in their reading of (...)
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  12. John-Michael M. Kuczynski (2006). Two Concepts of "Form" and the so-Called Computational Theory of Mind. Philosophical Psychology 19 (6):795-821.score: 180.0
    According to the computational theory of mind (CTM), to think is to compute. But what is meant by the word 'compute'? The generally given answer is this: Every case of computing is a case of manipulating symbols, but not vice versa - a manipulation of symbols must be driven exclusively by the formal properties of those symbols if it is qualify as a computation. In this paper, I will present the following argument. Words like 'form' and 'formal' are (...)
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  13. Kirk Ludwig & Susan Schneider (2008). Fodor's Challenge to the Classical Computational Theory of Mind. Mind and Language 23 (1):123–143.score: 180.0
    In The Mind Doesn’t Work that Way, Jerry Fodor argues that mental representations have context sensitive features relevant to cognition, and that, therefore, the Classical Computational Theory of Mind (CTM) is mistaken. We call this the Globality Argument. This is an in principle argument against CTM. We argue that it is self-defeating. We consider an alternative argument constructed from materials in the discussion, which avoids the pitfalls of the official argument. We argue that it is also unsound and (...)
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  14. Steven Horst, The Computational Theory of Mind. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 180.0
    Over the past thirty years, it is been common to hear the mind likened to a digital computer. This essay is concerned with a particular philosophical view that holds that the mind literally is a digital computer (in a specific sense of “computer” to be developed), and that thought literally is a kind of computation. This view—which will be called the “Computational Theory of Mind” (CTM)—is thus to be distinguished from other and broader attempts to connect the mind (...)
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  15. John-Michael Kuczynski (2007). Conceptual Atomism and the Computational Theory of Mind: A Defense of Content-Internalism and Semantic Externalism. John Benjamins & Co.score: 180.0
    Contemporary philosophy and theoretical psychology are dominated by an acceptance of content-externalism: the view that the contents of one's mental states are constitutively, as opposed to causally, dependent on facts about the external world. In the present work, it is shown that content-externalism involves a failure to distinguish between semantics and pre-semantics---between, on the one hand, the literal meanings of expressions and, on the other hand, the information that one must exploit in order to ascertain their literal meanings. It is (...)
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  16. John Mikhail (2008). Moral Cognition and Computational Theory. In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Moral Psychology Volume 3. MIT Press.score: 180.0
    In this comment on Joshua Greene's essay, The Secret Joke of Kant's Soul, I argue that a notable weakness of Greene's approach to moral psychology is its neglect of computational theory. A central problem moral cognition must solve is to recognize (i.e., compute representations of) the deontic status of human acts and omissions. How do people actually do this? What is the theory which explains their practice?
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  17. Iep Author, Computational Theory of Mind.score: 180.0
    The Computational Theory of Mind The Computational Theory of Mind (CTM) claims that the mind is a computer, so the theory is also known as computationalism. It is generally assumed that CTM is the main working hypothesis of cognitive science. CTM is often understood as a specific variant of the Representational Theory of Mind (RTM), […].
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  18. Tomer Fekete & Shimon Edelman (2011). Towards a Computational Theory of Experience. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):807-827.score: 180.0
    A standing challenge for the science of mind is to account for the datum that every mind faces in the most immediate – that is, unmediated – fashion: its phenomenal experience. The complementary tasks of explaining what it means for a system to give rise to experience and what constitutes the content of experience (qualia) in computational terms are particularly challenging, given the multiple realizability of computation. In this paper, we identify a set of conditions that a computational (...)
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  19. Rainer Reisenzein (2009). Emotional Experience in the Computational Belief-Desire Theory of Emotion. Emotion Review 1 (3):214-222.score: 168.0
    Based on the belief that computational modeling (thinking in terms of representation and computations) can help to clarify controversial issues in emotion theory, this article examines emotional experience from the perspective of the Computational Belief–Desire Theory of Emotion (CBDTE), a computational explication of the belief–desire theory of emotion. It is argued that CBDTE provides plausible answers to central explanatory challenges posed by emotional experience, including: the phenomenal quality,intensity and object-directedness of emotional experience, the function (...)
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  20. Janyce M. Wiebe & William J. Rapaport (1988). A Computational Theory of Perspective and Reference in Narrative. In Proceedings of the 26th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics.score: 168.0
    Narrative passages told from a character's perspective convey the character's thoughts and perceptions. We present a discourse process that recognizes characters' thoughts and perceptions in third-person narrative. An effect of perspective on reference in narrative is addressed: References in passages told from the perspective of a character reflect the character's beliefs. An algorithm that uses the results of our discourse process to understand references with respect to an appropriate set of beliefs is presented.
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  21. K. McClelland (forthcoming). Cycles of Conflict: A Computational Modeling Alternative to Collins's Theory of Conflict Escalation. Sociological Theory.score: 162.0
    In a new theory of conflict escalation, Randall Collins (2012) engages critical issues of violent conflict and presents a compellingly plausible theoretical description based on his extensive empirical research. He also sets a new challenge for sociology: explaining the time dynamics of social interaction. However, despite heavy reliance on the quantitative concept of positive feedback loops in his theory, Collins presents no mathematical specification of the dynamic relationships among his variables. This article seeks to fill that gap by (...)
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  22. Jason L. Megill (2004). Are We Paraconsistent? On the Lucas-Penrose Argument and the Computational Theory of Mind. Auslegung 27 (1):23-30.score: 162.0
     
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  23. P. S. Kitcher (1988). Marr's Computational Theory of Vision. Philosophy of Science 55 (March):1-24.score: 156.0
    David Marr's theory of vision has been widely cited by philosophers and psychologists. I have three projects in this paper. First, I try to offer a perspicuous characterization of Marr's theory. Next, I consider the implications of Marr's work for some currently popular philosophies of psychology, specifically, the "hegemony of neurophysiology view", the theories of Jerry Fodor, Daniel Dennett, and Stephen Stich, and the view that perception is permeated by belief. In the last section, I consider what the (...)
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  24. Steven Horst (1996). Symbols, Computation, and Intentionality: A Critique of the Computational Theory of Mind. University of California Press.score: 156.0
    In this carefully argued critique, Steven Horst pronounces the theory deficient.
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  25. Michael Rescorla (2014). A Theory of Computational Implementation. Synthese 191 (6):1277-1307.score: 156.0
    I articulate and defend a new theory of what it is for a physical system to implement an abstract computational model. According to my descriptivist theory, a physical system implements a computational model just in case the model accurately describes the system. Specifically, the system must reliably transit between computational states in accord with mechanical instructions encoded by the model. I contrast my theory with an influential approach to computational implementation espoused by Chalmers, (...)
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  26. Terrance Tomkow, The Computational Theory of the Laws of Nature.score: 156.0
    A new account of the of the laws of nature based upon Algorithmic Information Theory.
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  27. Jason L. Megill & Jon Cogburn (2005). Easy's Gettin' Harder All the Time: The Computational Theory and Affective States. Ratio 18 (3):306-316.score: 154.0
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  28. Keith Butler (1996). Individualism and Marr's Computational Theory of Vision. Mind and Language 11 (4):313-37.score: 154.0
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  29. Roger Fellows (1995). Welcome to Wales: Searle on the Computational Theory of Mind. In , Philosophy and Technology. New York: Cambridge University Press. 85-97.score: 154.0
  30. Murat Aydede (2005). Computation and Functionalism: Syntactic Theory of Mind Revisited. In G. Irzik & G. Guezeldere (eds.), Turkish Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science. Springer.score: 150.0
    There is a thesis often aired by some philosophers of psychology that syntax is all we need and there is no need to advert to intentional/semantic properties of symbols for purposes of psychological explanation. Indeed, the worry has been present since the first explicit articulation of so-called Computational Theory of Mind (CTM). Even Fodor, who has been the most ardent defender of the Language of Thought Hypoth- esis (LOTH) (which requires the CTM), has raised worries about its apparent (...)
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  31. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (ed.) (1986). Meaning And Cognitive Structure: Issues In The Computational Theory Of Mind. Norwood: Ablex.score: 150.0
  32. Louis C. Charland (1995). Emotion as a Natural Kind: Towards a Computational Foundation for Emotion Theory. Philosophical Psychology 8 (1):59-84.score: 150.0
    In this paper I link two hitherto disconnected sets of results in the philosophy of emotions and explore their implications for the computational theory of mind. The argument of the paper is that, for just the same reasons that some computationalists have thought that cognition may be a natural kind, so the same can plausibly be argued of emotion. The core of the argument is that emotions are a representation-governed phenomenon and that the explanation of how they figure (...)
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  33. Don Mathis & Michael Mozer (1996). Conscious and Unconscious Perception: A Computational Theory. In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. 324-328.score: 150.0
  34. Hans D. Muller (1999). Steven W. Horst, Symbols, Computation, and Intentionality: A Critique of the Computational Theory of Mind. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 9 (3):424-430.score: 150.0
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  35. Pirmin Stekeler-Weithofer (2008). The Computational Theory of Mind and the Decomposition of Actions. Philosophical Topics 36 (2):63-86.score: 150.0
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  36. Craig DeLancey (1997). Emotion and the Computational Theory of Mind. In S. O'Nuillain, Paul McKevitt & E. MacAogain (eds.), Two Sciences of Mind. John Benjamins.score: 150.0
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  37. Author unknown, Moral Cognition and Computational Theory.score: 150.0
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  38. Sachiko Kinoshita (1994). Does a Computational Theory of Human Memory Need Intelligence? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):673.score: 150.0
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  39. Brandon Zimmerman (2008). Conceptual Atomism and the Computational Theory of Mind. Review of Metaphysics 62 (1):141-142.score: 150.0
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  40. Sergio E. Lew & B. Silvano Zanutto (2011). A Computational Theory for the Learning of Equivalence Relations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 150.0
  41. Paul Thagard (1987). Zenon W. Pylyshyn and William Demopoulos, Eds., Meaning and Cognitive Structure: Issues in the Computational Theory of Mind Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 7 (10):422-423.score: 150.0
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  42. C. Castelfranchi (1995). Self-Awareness: Notes for a Computational Theory of Intrapsychic Social Interaction. In Giuseppe Trautteur (ed.), Consciousness: Distinction and Reflection. Bibliopolis. 55--80.score: 150.0
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  43. L. Jonathan Cohen (1980). Some Defects in Fodor' 'Computational' Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):75.score: 150.0
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  44. T. Fekete & S. Edelman (forthcoming). Prolegomena to a Computational Theory of Experience. Consciousness and Cognition. Under Review.score: 150.0
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  45. Robert L. Greene (1994). Why Do We Need a Computational Theory of Laboratory Tasks? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):668.score: 150.0
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  46. K. Holyoak (1996). Thagard. P.(1989). Analogical Mapping by Constraint Satisfaction: A Computational Theory. Cognitive Science 13.score: 150.0
     
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  47. Bipin Indurkhya (1987). Approximate Semantic Transference: A Computational Theory of Metaphors and Analogies. Cognitive Science 11 (4):445-480.score: 150.0
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  48. Richard McDonough (2001). Why the Computational Theory of Mind Doesn't Compute. [REVIEW] Metascience 10 (3):442-447.score: 150.0
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  49. Michael Pazzani (1991). A Computational Theory of Learning Causal Relationships. Cognitive Science 15 (3):401-424.score: 150.0
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