Search results for 'Computer' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. James H. Moor (2001). The Future of Computer Ethics: You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet! [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 3 (2):89-91.score: 24.0
    The computer revolution can beusefully divided into three stages, two ofwhich have already occurred: the introductionstage and the permeation stage. We have onlyrecently entered the third and most importantstage – the power stage – in which many ofthe most serious social, political, legal, andethical questions involving informationtechnology will present themselves on a largescale. The present article discusses severalreasons to believe that future developments ininformation technology will make computerethics more vibrant and more important thanever. Computer ethics is here to (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Darren Abramson (2011). Philosophy of Mind Is (in Part) Philosophy of Computer Science. Minds and Machines 21 (2):203-219.score: 24.0
    In this paper I argue that whether or not a computer can be built that passes the Turing test is a central question in the philosophy of mind. Then I show that the possibility of building such a computer depends on open questions in the philosophy of computer science: the physical Church-Turing thesis and the extended Church-Turing thesis. I use the link between the issues identified in philosophy of mind and philosophy of computer science to respond (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Wendy S. Parker (2009). Does Matter Really Matter? Computer Simulations, Experiments, and Materiality. Synthese 169 (3):483 - 496.score: 24.0
    A number of recent discussions comparing computer simulation and traditional experimentation have focused on the significance of “materiality.” I challenge several claims emerging from this work and suggest that computer simulation studies are material experiments in a straightforward sense. After discussing some of the implications of this material status for the epistemology of computer simulation, I consider the extent to which materiality (in a particular sense) is important when it comes to making justified inferences about target systems (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Margaret A. Boden (1988). Computer Models On Mind: Computational Approaches In Theoretical Psychology. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    What is the mind? How does it work? How does it influence behavior? Some psychologists hope to answer such questions in terms of concepts drawn from computer science and artificial intelligence. They test their theories by modeling mental processes in computers. This book shows how computer models are used to study many psychological phenomena--including vision, language, reasoning, and learning. It also shows that computer modeling involves differing theoretical approaches. Computational psychologists disagree about some basic questions. For instance, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Paul Humphreys (2009). The Philosophical Novelty of Computer Simulation Methods. Synthese 169 (3):615 - 626.score: 24.0
    Reasons are given to justify the claim that computer simulations and computational science constitute a distinctively new set of scientific methods and that these methods introduce new issues in the philosophy of science. These issues are both epistemological and methodological in kind.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Kenman Wong (2000). The Development of Computer Ethics: Contributions From Business Ethics and Medical Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (2):245-253.score: 24.0
    In this essay, we demonstrate that the field of computer ethics shares many core similarities with two other areas of applied ethics, Academicians writing and teaching in the area of computer ethics, along with practitioners, must address ethical issues that are qualitatively similar in nature to those raised in medicine and business. In addition, as academic disciplines, these three fields also share some similar concerns. For example, all face the difficult challenge of maintaining a credible dialogue with diverse (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. TerrellWard Bynum (2001). Computer Ethics: Its Birth and its Future. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 3 (2):109-112.score: 24.0
    This article discusses some``historical milestones'' in computer ethics, aswell as two alternative visions of the futureof computer ethics. Topics include theimpressive foundation for computer ethics laiddown by Norbert Wiener in the 1940s and early1950s; the pioneering efforts of Donn Parker,Joseph Weizenbaum and Walter Maner in the1970s; Krystyna Gorniak's hypothesis thatcomputer ethics will evolve into ``globalethics''; and Deborah Johnson's speculation thatcomputer ethics may someday ``disappear''.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ronald N. Giere (2009). Is Computer Simulation Changing the Face of Experimentation? Philosophical Studies 143 (1):59 - 62.score: 24.0
    Morrison points out many similarities between the roles of simulation models and other sorts of models in science. On the basis of these similarities she claims that running a simulation is epistemologically on a par with doing a traditional experiment and that the output of a simulation therefore counts as a measurement. I agree with her premises but reject the inference. The epistemological payoff of a traditional experiment is greater (or less) confidence in the fit between a model and a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Eran Tal (2011). From Data to Phenomena and Back Again: Computer-Simulated Signatures. Synthese 182 (1):117-129.score: 24.0
    This paper draws attention to an increasingly common method of using computer simulations to establish evidential standards in physics. By simulating an actual detection procedure on a computer, physicists produce patterns of data (‘signatures’) that are expected to be observed if a sought-after phenomenon is present. Claims to detect the phenomenon are evaluated by comparing such simulated signatures with actual data. Here I provide a justification for this practice by showing how computer simulations establish the reliability of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Richard Heersmink, Jeroen van den Hoven, Nees Jan van Eck & Jan van den Berg (2011). Bibliometric Mapping of Computer and Information Ethics. Ethics and Information Technology 13 (3):241-249.score: 24.0
    This paper presents the first bibliometric mapping analysis of the field of computer and information ethics (C&IE). It provides a map of the relations between 400 key terms in the field. This term map can be used to get an overview of concepts and topics in the field and to identify relations between information and communication technology concepts on the one hand and ethical concepts on the other hand. To produce the term map, a data set of over thousand (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Amnon Eden (2011). Some Philosophical Issues in Computer Science. Minds and Machines 21 (2):123-133.score: 24.0
    The essays included in the special issue dedicated to the philosophy of computer science examine new philosophical questions that arise from reflection upon conceptual issues in computer science and the insights such an enquiry provides into ongoing philosophical debates.
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Aron Vallinder & Erik J. Olsson (2013). Do Computer Simulations Support the Argument From Disagreement? Synthese 190 (8):1437-1454.score: 24.0
    According to the Argument from Disagreement (AD) widespread and persistent disagreement on ethical issues indicates that our moral opinions are not influenced by moral facts, either because there are no such facts or because there are such facts but they fail to influence our moral opinions. In an innovative paper, Gustafsson and Peterson (Synthese, published online 16 October, 2010) study the argument by means of computer simulation of opinion dynamics, relying on the well-known model of Hegselmann and Krause (J (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Mark Coeckelbergh (2007). Violent Computer Games, Empathy, and Cosmopolitanism. Ethics and Information Technology 9 (3):219-231.score: 24.0
    Many philosophical and public discussions of the ethical aspects of violent computer games typically centre on the relation between playing violent videogames and its supposed direct consequences on violent behaviour. But such an approach rests on a controversial empirical claim, is often one-sided in the range of moral theories used, and remains on a general level with its focus on content alone. In response to these problems, I pick up Matt McCormick’s thesis that potential harm from playing computer (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Timothy Colburn & Gary Shute (2007). Abstraction in Computer Science. Minds and Machines 17 (2):169-184.score: 24.0
    We characterize abstraction in computer science by first comparing the fundamental nature of computer science with that of its cousin mathematics. We consider their primary products, use of formalism, and abstraction objectives, and find that the two disciplines are sharply distinguished. Mathematics, being primarily concerned with developing inference structures, has information neglect as its abstraction objective. Computer science, being primarily concerned with developing interaction patterns, has information hiding as its abstraction objective. We show that abstraction through information (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Sanford C. Goldberg (1997). The Very Idea of Computer Self-Knowledge and Self-Deception. Minds and Machines 7 (4):515-529.score: 24.0
    Do computers have beliefs? I argue that anyone who answers in the affirmative holds a view that is incompatible with what I shall call the commonsense approach to the propositional attitudes. My claims shall be two. First,the commonsense view places important constraints on what can be acknowledged as a case of having a belief. Second, computers – at least those for which having a belief would be conceived as having a sentence in a belief box – fail to satisfy some (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Philip Brey (2005). The Epistemology and Ontology of Human-Computer Interaction. Minds and Machines 15 (3-4):383-398.score: 24.0
    This paper analyzes epistemological and ontological dimensions of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) through an analysis of the functions of computer systems in relation to their users. It is argued that the primary relation between humans and computer systems has historically been epistemic: computers are used as information-processing and problem-solving tools that extend human cognition, thereby creating hybrid cognitive systems consisting of a human processor and an artificial processor that process information in tandem. In this role, computer systems (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. John Weckert (2001). Computer Ethics: Future Directions. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 3 (2):93-96.score: 24.0
    Changes in information technologylead to new topics and new emphases in computerethics. The present article examines a varietyof such issues, and argues that computer ethicsmust become more rigorous and develop astronger theoretical base. The articleconcludes with a discussion of ways to makecomputer ethics more effective in bringinghelpful changes to the world.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Wendy S. Parker (2008). Computer Simulation Through an Error-Statistical Lens. Synthese 163 (3):371 - 384.score: 24.0
    After showing how Deborah Mayo’s error-statistical philosophy of science might be applied to address important questions about the evidential status of computer simulation results, I argue that an error-statistical perspective offers an interesting new way of thinking about computer simulation models and has the potential to significantly improve the practice of simulation model evaluation. Though intended primarily as a contribution to the epistemology of simulation, the analysis also serves to fill in details of Mayo’s epistemology of experiment.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Guglielmo Tamburrini (2009). Brain to Computer Communication: Ethical Perspectives on Interaction Models. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 2 (3):137-149.score: 24.0
    Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) enable one to control peripheral ICT and robotic devices by processing brain activity on-line. The potential usefulness of BCI systems, initially demonstrated in rehabilitation medicine, is now being explored in education, entertainment, intensive workflow monitoring, security, and training. Ethical issues arising in connection with these investigations are triaged taking into account technological imminence and pervasiveness of BCI technologies. By focussing on imminent technological developments, ethical reflection is informatively grounded into realistic protocols of brain-to-computer communication. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. David Sanford Horner (2010). Moral Luck and Computer Ethics: Gauguin in Cyberspace. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 12 (4):299-312.score: 24.0
    Issue Title: Moral Luck, Social Networking Sites, and Trust on the Web I argue that the problem of 'moral luck' is an unjustly neglected topic within Computer Ethics. This is unfortunate given that the very nature of computer technology, its 'logical malleability', leads to ever greater levels of complexity, unreliability and uncertainty. The ever widening contexts of application in turn lead to greater scope for the operation of chance and the phenomenon of moral luck. Moral luck bears down (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Timothy R. Colburn (1991). Program Verification, Defeasible Reasoning, and Two Views of Computer Science. Minds and Machines 1 (1):97-116.score: 24.0
    In this paper I attempt to cast the current program verification debate within a more general perspective on the methodologies and goals of computer science. I show, first, how any method involved in demonstrating the correctness of a physically executing computer program, whether by testing or formal verification, involves reasoning that is defeasible in nature. Then, through a delineation of the senses in which programs can be run as tests, I show that the activities of testing and formal (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Earl W. Spurgin (2003). What's Wrong with Computer-Generated Images of Perfection in Advertising? Journal of Business Ethics 45 (3):257 - 268.score: 24.0
    Advertisers often use computers to create fantastic images. Generally, these are perfectly harmless images that are used for comic or dramatic effect. Sometimes, however, they are problematic human images that I call computer-generated images of perfection. Advertisers create these images by using computer technology to remove unwanted traits from models or to generate entire human bodies. They are images that portray ideal human beauty, bodies, or looks. In this paper, I argue that the use of such images is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Tibor Bosse, Martijn C. Schut & Jan Treur (2009). Formal Analysis of Dynamics Within Philosophy of Mind by Computer Simulation. Minds and Machines 19 (4):543-555.score: 24.0
    Computer simulations can be useful tools to support philosophers in validating their theories, especially when these theories concern phenomena showing nontrivial dynamics. Such theories are usually informal, whilst for computer simulation a formally described model is needed. In this paper, a methodology is proposed to gradually formalise philosophical theories in terms of logically formalised dynamic properties. One outcome of this process is an executable logic-based temporal specification, which within a dedicated software environment can be used as a simulation (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Herman T. Tavani (2001). The State of Computer Ethics as a Philosophical Field of Inquiry: Some Contemporary Perspectives, Future Projections, and Current Resources. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 3 (2):97-108.score: 24.0
    The present article focusesupon three aspects of computer ethics as aphilosophical field: contemporary perspectives,future projections, and current resources.Several topics are covered, including variouscomputer ethics methodologies, the `uniqueness'of computer ethics questions, and speculationsabout the impact of globalization and theinternet. Also examined is the suggestion thatcomputer ethics may `disappear' in the future.Finally, there is a brief description ofcomputer ethics resources, such as journals,textbooks, conferences and associations.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Timothy Colburn & Gary Shute (2011). Decoupling as a Fundamental Value of Computer Science. Minds and Machines 21 (2):241-259.score: 24.0
    Computer science is an engineering science whose objective is to determine how to best control interactions among computational objects. We argue that it is a fundamental computer science value to design computational objects so that the dependencies required by their interactions do not result in couplings, since coupling inhibits change. The nature of knowledge in any science is revealed by how concepts in that science change through paradigm shifts, so we analyze classic paradigm shifts in both natural and (...)
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Michael E. Cuffaro (forthcoming). How-Possibly Explanations in Quantum Computer Science. Philosophy of Science.score: 24.0
    A primary goal of quantum computer science is to find an explanation for the fact that quantum computers are more powerful than classical computers. In this paper I argue that to answer this question is to compare algorithmic processes of various kinds, and in so doing to describe the possibility spaces associated with these processes. By doing this we explain how it is possible for one process to outperform its rival. Further, in this and similar examples little is gained (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Paul McCullagh, Gaye Lightbody, Jaroslaw Zygierewicz & W. George Kernohan (2014). Ethical Challenges Associated with the Development and Deployment of Brain Computer Interface Technology. Neuroethics 7 (2):109-122.score: 24.0
    Brain Computer Interface (BCI) technology offers potential for human augmentation in areas ranging from communication to home automation, leisure and gaming. This paper addresses ethical challenges associated with the wider scale deployment of BCI as an assistive technology by documenting issues associated with the development of non-invasive BCI technology. Laboratory testing is normally carried out with volunteers but further testing with subjects, who may be in vulnerable groups is often needed to improve system operation. BCI development is technically complex, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Pim Haselager (2013). Did I Do That? Brain–Computer Interfacing and the Sense of Agency. Minds and Machines 23 (3):405-418.score: 24.0
    Brain–computer interfacing (BCI) aims at directly capturing brain activity in order to enable a user to drive an application such as a wheelchair without using peripheral neural or motor systems. Low signal to noise ratio’s, low processing speed, and huge intra- and inter-subject variability currently call for the addition of intelligence to the applications, in order to compensate for errors in the production and/or the decoding of brain signals. However, the combination of minds and machines through BCI’s and intelligent (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Femke Nijboer, Jens Clausen, Brendan Z. Allison & Pim Haselager (2013). The Asilomar Survey: Stakeholders' Opinions on Ethical Issues Related to Brain-Computer Interfacing. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 6 (3):541-578.score: 24.0
    Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) research and (future) applications raise important ethical issues that need to be addressed to promote societal acceptance and adequate policies. Here we report on a survey we conducted among 145 BCI researchers at the 4th International BCI conference, which took place in May–June 2010 in Asilomar, California. We assessed respondents’ opinions about a number of topics. First, we investigated preferences for terminology and definitions relating to BCIs. Second, we assessed respondents’ expectations on the marketability of different (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Helen Nissenbaum (2005). Where Computer Security Meets National Security. Ethics and Information Technology 7 (2):61-73.score: 24.0
    This paper identifies two conceptions of security in contemporary concerns over the vulnerability of computers and networks to hostile attack. One is derived from individual-focused conceptions of computer security developed in computer science and engineering. The other is informed by the concerns of national security agencies of government as well as those of corporate intellectual property owners. A comparative evaluation of these two conceptions utilizes the theoretical construct of “securitization,”developed by the Copenhagen School of International Relations.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Dominic Lopes (2009). A Philosophy of Computer Art. Routledge.score: 24.0
    The machine in the ghost -- A computer art form -- Live wires: computing interaction -- Work to rule -- Artist to audience -- Computer art poetics -- Atari to art -- Envoi.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Amnon H. Eden (2007). Three Paradigms of Computer Science. Minds and Machines 17 (2):135-167.score: 24.0
    We examine the philosophical disputes among computer scientists concerning methodological, ontological, and epistemological questions: Is computer science a branch of mathematics, an engineering discipline, or a natural science? Should knowledge about the behaviour of programs proceed deductively or empirically? Are computer programs on a par with mathematical objects, with mere data, or with mental processes? We conclude that distinct positions taken in regard to these questions emanate from distinct sets of received beliefs or paradigms within the discipline: (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Justin Solomon (2009). Programmers, Professors, and Parasites: Credit and Co-Authorship in Computer Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (4):467-489.score: 24.0
    This article presents an in-depth analysis of past and present publishing practices in academic computer science to suggest the establishment of a more consistent publishing standard. Historical precedent for academic publishing in computer science is established through the study of anecdotes as well as statistics collected from databases of published computer science papers. After examining these facts alongside information about analogous publishing situations and standards in other scientific fields, the article concludes with a list of basic principles (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Philip J. Nickel (2011). Ethics in E-Trust and E-Trustworthiness: The Case of Direct Computer-Patient Interfaces. Ethics and Information Technology 13 (2):355-363.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I examine the ethics of e - trust and e - trustworthiness in the context of health care, looking at direct computer-patient interfaces (DCPIs), information systems that provide medical information, diagnosis, advice, consenting and/or treatment directly to patients without clinicians as intermediaries. Designers, manufacturers and deployers of such systems have an ethical obligation to provide evidence of their trustworthiness to users. My argument for this claim is based on evidentialism about trust and trustworthiness: the idea that (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Timothy Colburn & Gary Shute (2010). Abstraction, Law, and Freedom in Computer Science. Metaphilosophy 41 (3):345-364.score: 24.0
    Abstract: Laws of computer science are prescriptive in nature but can have descriptive analogs in the physical sciences. Here, we describe a law of conservation of information in network programming, and various laws of computational motion (invariants) for programming in general, along with their pedagogical utility. Invariants specify constraints on objects in abstract computational worlds, so we describe language and data abstraction employed by software developers and compare them to Floridi's concept of levels of abstraction. We also consider Floridi's (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Michael J. Quinn (2006). On Teaching Computer Ethics Within a Computer Science Department. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2):335-343.score: 24.0
    The author has surveyed a quarter of the accredited undergraduate computer science programs in the United States. More than half of these programs offer a “social and ethical implications of computing” course taught by a computer science faculty member, and there appears to be a trend toward teaching ethics classes within computer science departments. Although the decision to create an “in house” computer ethics course may sometimes be a pragmatic response to pressure from the accreditation agency, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Justine Johnstone (2007). Technology as Empowerment: A Capability Approach to Computer Ethics. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 9 (1):73-87.score: 24.0
    Standard agent and action-based approaches in computer ethics tend to have difficulty dealing with complex systems-level issues such as the digital divide and globalisation. This paper argues for a value-based agenda to complement traditional approaches in computer ethics, and that one value-based approach well-suited to technological domains can be found in capability theory. Capability approaches have recently become influential in a number of fields with an ethical or policy dimension, but have not so far been applied in (...) ethics. The paper introduces two major versions of the theory – those advanced by Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum – and argues that they offer potentially valuable conceptual tools for computer ethics. By developing a theory of value based on core human functionings and the capabilities (powers, freedoms) required to realise them, capability theory is shown to have a number of potential benefits that complement standard ethical theory, opening up new approaches to analysis and providing a framework that incorporates a justice as well as an ethics dimension. The underlying functionalism of capability theory is seen to be particularly appropriate to technology ethics, enabling the integration of normative and descriptive analysis of technology in terms of human needs and values. The paper concludes by considering some criticisms of the theory and directions for further development. (shrink)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Dirk Schlimm (2009). Learning From the Existence of Models: On Psychic Machines, Tortoises, and Computer Simulations. Synthese 169 (3):521 - 538.score: 24.0
    Using four examples of models and computer simulations from the history of psychology, I discuss some of the methodological aspects involved in their construction and use, and I illustrate how the existence of a model can demonstrate the viability of a hypothesis that had previously been deemed impossible on a priori grounds. This shows a new way in which scientists can learn from models that extends the analysis of Morgan (1999), who has identified the construction and manipulation of models (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. D. Alexander Varakin, Daniel T. Levin & Roger Fidler (2004). Unseen and Unaware: Implications of Recent Research on Failures of Visual Awareness for Human-Computer Interface Design. Human-Computer Interaction 19 (4):389-422.score: 24.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Claus Beisbart (2012). How Can Computer Simulations Produce New Knowledge? European Journal for Philosophy of Science 2 (3):395-434.score: 24.0
    It is often claimed that scientists can obtain new knowledge about nature by running computer simulations. How is this possible? I answer this question by arguing that computer simulations are arguments. This view parallels Norton’s argument view about thought experiments. I show that computer simulations can be reconstructed as arguments that fully capture the epistemic power of the simulations. Assuming the extended mind hypothesis, I furthermore argue that running the computer simulation is to execute the reconstructing (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Markus F. Peschl & Chris Stary (1998). The Role of Cognitive Modeling for User Interface Design Representations: An Epistemological Analysis of Knowledge Engineering in the Context of Human-Computer Interaction. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 8 (2):203-236.score: 24.0
    In this paper we review some problems with traditional approaches for acquiring and representing knowledge in the context of developing user interfaces. Methodological implications for knowledge engineering and for human-computer interaction are studied. It turns out that in order to achieve the goal of developing human-oriented (in contrast to technology-oriented) human-computer interfaces developers have to develop sound knowledge of the structure and the representational dynamics of the cognitive system which is interacting with the computer.We show that in (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Luciano Floridi & J. W. Sanders (2002). Mapping the Foundationalist Debate in Computer Ethics. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (1):1-9.score: 24.0
    The paper provides a critical review of thedebate on the foundations of Computer Ethics(CE). Starting from a discussion of Moor'sclassic interpretation of the need for CEcaused by a policy and conceptual vacuum, fivepositions in the literature are identified anddiscussed: the ``no resolution approach'',according to which CE can have no foundation;the professional approach, according to whichCE is solely a professional ethics; the radicalapproach, according to which CE deals withabsolutely unique issues, in need of a uniqueapproach; the conservative approach, accordingto which (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Gerd Grübler (2011). Beyond the Responsibility Gap. Discussion Note on Responsibility and Liability in the Use of Brain-Computer Interfaces. AI and Society 26 (4):377-382.score: 24.0
    The article shows where the argument of responsibility-gap regarding brain-computer interfaces acquires its plausibility from, and suggests why the argument is not plausible. As a way of an explanation, a distinction between the descriptive third-person perspective and the interpretative first-person perspective is introduced. Several examples and metaphors are used to show that ascription of agency and responsibility does not, even in simple cases, require that people be in causal control of every individual detail involved in an event. Taking up (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Robyn Brothers (2000). The Computer-Mediated Public Sphere and the Cosmopolitan Ideal. Ethics and Information Technology 2 (2):91-97.score: 24.0
    In response to the attractive moral and politicalmodel of cosmopolitanism, this paper offers anoverview of some of the conceptual limitations to thatmodel arising from computer-mediated, interest-basedsocial interaction. I discuss James Bohman''sdefinition of the global and cosmopolitan spheres andhow computer-mediated communication might impact thedevelopment of those spheres. Additionally, I questionthe commitment to purely rational models of socialcooperation when theorizing a computer-mediated globalpublic sphere, exploring recent alternatives. Andfinally, I discuss a few of the political andepistemic constraints on participation in (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Rawad El Skaf & Cyrille Imbert (2013). Unfolding in the Empirical Sciences: Experiments, Thought Experiments and Computer Simulations. Synthese 190 (16):3451-3474.score: 24.0
    Experiments (E), computer simulations (CS) and thought experiments (TE) are usually seen as playing different roles in science and as having different epistemologies. Accordingly, they are usually analyzed separately. We argue in this paper that these activities can contribute to answering the same questions by playing the same epistemic role when they are used to unfold the content of a well-described scenario. We emphasize that in such cases, these three activities can be described by means of the same conceptual (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Bjarke Liboriussen (2013). Craft, Creativity, Computer Games: The Fusion of Play and Material Consciousness. Philosophy and Technology 26 (3):273-282.score: 24.0
    In a historical perspective, what is novel about computer games is that they are not pure games but cultural objects which allow the playful desires identified by Caillois to be fused with craftsmanship, the desire to do a job well for its own sake (Sennett). Play is often defined in opposition to work, for example by Huizinga and Caillois, but craftsmanship has two qualities which can be found in both. Firstly, craftsmanship entails creative attention to the material at hand (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. W. Oberschelp (1998). The Sorcerer and the Apprentice. Human-Computer Interaction Today. AI and Society 12 (1-2):97-104.score: 24.0
    Human-computer interaction today has got a touch of magic: Without understanding the causal coherence, using a computer seems to become the art to use the right spell with the mouse as the magic wand — the sorcerer's staff. Goethes's poem admits an allegoric interpretation. We explicate the analogy between using a computer and casting a spell with emphasis on teaching magic skills. The art to create an ergonomic user interface has to take care of various levels of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Thomas Ehrhard (ed.) (2004). Linear Logic in Computer Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Linear Logic is a branch of proof theory which provides refined tools for the study of the computational aspects of proofs. These tools include a duality-based categorical semantics, an intrinsic graphical representation of proofs, the introduction of well-behaved non-commutative logical connectives, and the concepts of polarity and focalisation. These various aspects are illustrated here through introductory tutorials as well as more specialised contributions, with a particular emphasis on applications to computer science: denotational semantics, lambda-calculus, logic programming and concurrency theory. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. William J. Rapaport (2005). Philosophy of Computer Science. Teaching Philosophy 28 (4):319-341.score: 24.0
    There are many branches of philosophy called “the philosophy of X,” where X = disciplines ranging from history to physics. The philosophy of artificial intelligence has a long history, and there are many courses and texts with that title. Surprisingly, the philosophy of computer science is not nearly as well-developed. This article proposes topics that might constitute the philosophy of computer science and describes a course covering those topics, along with suggested readings and assignments.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Jon Dovey (2006). Game Cultures: Computer Games as New Media. Open University Press.score: 24.0
    This book introduces the critical concepts and debates that are shaping the emerging field of game studies. Exploring games in the context of cultural studies and media studies, it analyses computer games as the most popular contemporary form of new media production and consumption. The book: Argues for the centrality of play in redefining reading, consuming and creating culture Offers detailed research into the political economy of games to generate a model of new media production Examines the dynamics of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000