Search results for 'Computers and civilization' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  3
    Harold J. Morowitz (1999). The New Renaissance: Computers And The Next Level of Civilization by Douglas S. Robertson. Complexity 5 (2):35-35.
  2. Harold J. Morowitz (1999). Books and Software Reviews-The New Renaissance: Computers and the Next Level of Civilization. Complexity 5 (2):35-35.
     
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  3. Michio Kaku (1997). Visions: How Science Will Revolutionize the 21st Century. Anchor Books.
    In a spellbinding narrative that skillfully weaves together cutting-edge research among today's foremost scientists, theoretical physicist Michio Kaku--author of the bestselling book Hyperspace --presents a bold, exhilarating adventure into the science of tomorrow. In Visions, Dr. Kaku examines in vivid detail how the three scientific revolutions that profoundly reshaped the twentieth century--the quantum, biogenetic, and computer revolutions--will transform the way we live in the twenty-first century. The fundamental elements of matter and life--the particles of the atom and the nucleus of (...)
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  4.  29
    Donna Jeanne Haraway (1997). Modest₋Witness@Second₋Millennium.Femaleman₋Meets₋Oncomouse: Feminism and Technoscience. Routledge.
    Modest_Witness@Second_Millennium. FemaleMan_Meets_OncoMouse explores the roles of stories, figures, dreams, theories, facts, delusions, advertising, institutions, economic arrangements, publishing practices, scientific advances, and politics in twentieth- century technoscience. The book's title is an e-mail address. With it, Haraway locates herself and her readers in a sprawling net of associations more far-flung than the Internet. The address is not a cozy home. There is no innocent place to stand in the world where the book's author figure, FemaleMan, encounters DuPont's controversial laboratory rodent, OncoMouse. (...)
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  5. Philip J. Davis (1986/2005). Descartes' Dream: The World According to Mathematics. Dover Publications.
    Philosopher Rene Descartes visualized a world unified by mathematics, in which all intellectual issues could be resolved rationally by local computation. This series of provocative essays takes a modern look at the seventeenth-century thinker’s dream, examining the physical and intellectual influences of mathematics on society, particularly in light of technological advances. They survey the conditions that elicit the application of mathematic principles; the effectiveness of these applications; and how applied mathematics constrain lives and transform perceptions of reality. Highly suitable for (...)
     
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  6. Pierre Lévy (1987). La Machine Univers Création, Cognition Et Culture Informatique. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  7.  14
    Sally Munt (ed.) (2001). Technospaces: Inside the New Media. Continuum.
    In this book, an international team of authors explore themes of depth and surface, of real and conceptual space and of human/machine interaction.
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  8. Peter Schefe & Margaret A. Boden (1993). Informatik Und Philosophie. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  9.  4
    Gustaf Östberg (1989). What is a Materials Data System? AI and Society 3 (3):220-228.
    During the last two decades considerable efforts have been made to develop computerized data systems for engineering materials. The results have not come up to the expectations of systems that can be used by designers for selecting of materials. Some factors have been recognized as responsible for the slow progress. It has proved difficult, however, for those involved in this development to make use of such information about the systems in question. Conflicts have occurred between different parties involved. It now (...)
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  10.  2
    R. D. Parslow (1981). The Computerized Destruction of Western Civilization. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 11 (2):16.
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  11.  18
    James Lovelock & Peter Seidel (2003). A Primer of Civilization. World Futures 59 (3 & 4):315 – 318.
    All past civilizations came to an end for various reasons. We should not assume we are different. Besides the possibility of internal decline, there are threats such as the possibility of nuclear war or a sizable asteroid hitting the earth. While community knowledge of social insects is in their genes, ours is in print computers, etc. Loss of access to this knowledge would be catastrophic for future generations. What might be available would be of little help. In the Dark (...)
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  12.  1
    Joe Podolsky (1995). Book Review: Out of Control: The Rise of Neo-Biological Civilization by Kevin Kelly. [REVIEW] Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 25 (3):38-39.
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  13.  89
    John R. Searle (2009). Making the Social World: The Structure of Human Civilization. Oxford University Press.
    The purpose of this book -- Intentionality -- Collective intentionality and the assignment of function -- Language as biological and social -- The general theory of institutions and institutional facts: -- Language and social reality -- Free will, rationality, and institutional facts -- Power : deontic, background, political, and other -- Human rights -- Concluding remarks : the ontological foundations of the social sciences.
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  14.  78
    Richard Oxenberg, Why Computers Are Not Intelligent: An Argument.
    Computers can mimic human intelligence, sometimes quite impressively. This has led some to claim that, a.) computers can actually acquire intelligence, and/or, b.) the human mind may be thought of as a very sophisticated computer. In this paper I argue that neither of these inferences are sound. The human mind and computers, I argue, operate on radically different principles.
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  15.  10
    Herbert Marcuse (1969). Eros and Civilization: A Philosophical Inquiry Into Freud. London,Sphere.
    Contends that Freud's theory of civilization is substantially sociological, and examines the philosophical and sociological implications of key Freudian ...
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  16. Gerard Ahearne (2013). Towards an Ecological Civilization: A Gramscian Strategy for a New Political Subject. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):317-326.
    While much work has been done theorising the concept of an ecological civilization, the actual transition to an ecological civilization is another matter. One possible strategy for transforming our world from a death-rattle industrial civilization to a life affirming ecological civilization may be found in the later work of Antonio Gramsci. It is argued that as Gramsci became increasingly disillusioned with Soviet communism, he diagnosed its failure as due to the way opposition movements tend to mirror (...)
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  17.  88
    Nicholas Maxwell (1994). Towards a New Enlightenment: What the Task of Creating Civilization has to Learn From the Success of Modern Science. In Ronald Barnett (ed.), Academic Community: Discourse or Discord? Jessica Kingsley
    We face two great probems of learning: learning about the universe and about ourselves as a part of the universe, and learning how to create world civilization. We have solved the first problem, but not the second. We need to learn from our solution to the first problem how to solve the second. That involves getting clear about the nature of the progress-achieving methods of science, generalizing these methods so that they become fruitfully applicable to any problematic endeavour, and (...)
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  18.  27
    R. G. Collingwood (1992/1984). The New Leviathan, or, Man, Society, Civilization, and Barbarism. Oxford University Press.
    The New Leviathan, originally published in 1942, a few months before the author's death, is the book which R. G. Collingwood chose to write in preference to completing his life's work on the philosophy of history. It was a reaction to the Second World War and the threat which Nazism and Fascism constituted to civilization. The book draws upon many years of work in moral and political philosophy and attempts to establish the multiple and complex connections between the levels (...)
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  19. Jaroslav Krejčí (2004). The Paths of Civilization: Understanding the Currents of History. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In this ambitious exploration of humanity and civilizations throughout history, major historical events and processes in the history of mankind are looked at in order to understand the "currents" of history. Jaroslav Krejc analyzes the whole history of civilization and considers historical events such as feudalism and the development of science. By bringing both sociological and historical insights to this broad subject, and particular attention to different types of knowledge (such as religion and its impact state law labor and (...)
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  20.  26
    Stefano Gualeni (2014). Augmented Ontologies or How to Philosophize with a Digital Hammer. Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):177-199.
    Could a person ever transcend what it is like to be in the world as a human being? Could we ever know what it is like to be other creatures? Questions about the overcoming of a human perspective are not uncommon in the history of philosophy. In the last century, those very interrogatives were notably raised by American philosopher Thomas Nagel in the context of philosophy of mind. In his 1974 essay What is it Like to Be a Bat?, Nagel (...)
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  21.  12
    Samuel Vriezen (2012). The Poetry of Jeroen Mettes. Continent 2 (1):22-28.
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 22–28. Jeroen Mettes burst onto the Dutch poetry scene twice. First, in 2005, when he became a strong presence on the nascent Dutch poetry blogosphere overnight as he embarked on his critical project Dichtersalfabet (Poet’s Alphabet). And again in 2011, when to great critical acclaim (and some bafflement) his complete writings were published – almost five years after his far too early death. 2005 was the year in which Dutch poetry blogging exploded. That year saw the foundation (...)
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  22. Albert Schweitzer (1980/1987). The Philosophy of Civilization. Prometheus Books.
    The decay and the restoration of civilization -- Civilization and ethics.
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  23.  11
    Zhongjiang Wang (2011). Ultimate Concern, Reflection of Civilization, and the Idea of “Man” in Yin Haiguang. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (4):565-584.
    Yin Haiguang’s investigation and pursuit of the idea of “Man” reflect not merely a limited historical or parochial academic interest, but indeed address an ultimate concern of humanity which transcends any spatio-temporal limitations. In criticizing “modern man” for its faceless and non-self-identical figure, Yin Haiguang brings the conditions, purposes and noble values of humanity to light. His work has extraordinary significance for the highest aims of humanity and civilization.
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  24. Corey Abel (2011). Oakeshott’s Wise Defense: Christianity as A Civilization. In The Meanings of Michael Oakeshott's Christianity.
    This paper for the first time reveals Oakeshott' early interest in writing a work of Christian apology. This "apology" was conceived in accordance with Oakeshott's religious modernism. Since Oakeshott never completed a formal apology, the author explores some early essays in which parts of the apologetic project are reflected, and then goes on to race the religious themes present in many of Oakeshott's published work. In conclusion, it is suggested that Oakeshott maybe understood as offering a concept of civilization (...)
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  25.  16
    Brett Bowden (2009). The Empire of Civilization: The Evolution of an Imperial Idea. University of Chicago Press.
    From the Crusades to the colonial era to the global war on terror, this sweeping volume exposes “civilization” as a stage-managed account of history that ...
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  26. M. de Wulf (1922/2005). Philosophy and Civilization in the Middle Ages. Dover Publications.
    This classic study by a distinguished scholar surveys the major philosophical trends and thinkers of a vital period in Western civilization. Based on Maurice DeWulf's celebrated Princeton University lectures, it offers an accessible view of medieval history, covering scholastic, ecclesiastic, classicist, and secular thought of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. From Anselm and Abelard to Thomas Aquinas and William of Occam, it chronicles the influence of the era's great philosophers on their contemporaries as well as on subsequent generations.
     
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  27. Edgar L. Eckfeldt (2011). The Christian Legacy: Taming Brutish Human Nature in Western Civilization. Life Wisdom Books.
    A people divided -- Impact of science -- The physical world and its life forms -- Human beginnings -- Our animal instincts -- An inward look -- Emergence of civilization -- Flaws in civilizations -- Brutal despair in ancient Rome -- Persistent cruelty -- The search for ethics in antiquity -- Ecclesiastical search for ethics in Christianity -- The Gospel's ethical impact -- Ethical impact in multi-invaded Britannia -- Ethical impact in seeking freedom -- Rather humanitarian Britain -- Rather (...)
     
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  28. Maurice M. Eisenstein (1999). Phenomenology of Civilization: Reason as a Regulative Principle in Collingwood and Husserl. Upa.
    Phenomenology of Civilization explores the philosophy of Edmund Husserl and R.G. Collingwood, two of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century. Husserl founded phenomenology, which has had a direct effect on contemporary philosophy, and Collingwood, though less formally known, is still one of the most commonly read twentieth century philosophers. Maurice Eisenstein examines their work in relation to recent philosophy, particularly focusing on existentialism, Heideggerian phenomenology, and postmodernism. He brings these two philosophers together because they were contemporaries of (...)
     
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  29. Michio Kitahara (1995). The Entangled Civilization: Democracy, Equality, and Freedom at a Loss. Upa.
    Why are democracy, equality and freedom currently in such turmoil? Kitahara discusses the confusion and pessimism in Western civilization today. The author presents his theory of civilization and suggests how the enormous problems within Western civilization can be addressed by pursuing the original basis of Western civilization-individualism. The three key values of democracy, equality and freedom are then re-interpreted from the perspective of individualism, and possibilities for dealing with the problems of Western civilization are suggested. (...)
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  30.  39
    Michael Levin (2004). J.S. Mill on Civilization and Barbarism. Frank Cass.
    John Stuart Mill's best-known work is On Liberty. In it he declared that Western society was in danger of coming to a standstill. This was an extraordinarily pessimistic claim in view of Britain's global dominance at the time and one that has been insufficiently investigated in the secondary literature. The wanting model was that of China, a once advanced civilization that had apparently ossified. To understand how Mill came to this conclusion requires one to investigate his notion of the (...)
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  31.  6
    Masahiro Morioka (2003). Painless Civilization: A Philosophical Critique of Desire. Trasview.
    Morioka's most controversial book to date. The endless tendency to eliminate pain and suffering makes us totally lose sight of the meaning of life that is indispensable to human beings. How are we to battle against this painless civilization?
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  32.  19
    Roger Penrose (1999). The Emperor's New Mind: Concerning Computers, Minds, and the Laws of Physics. OUP Oxford.
    In his bestselling work of popular science, Sir Roger Penrose takes us on a fascinating roller-coaster ride through the basic principles of physics, cosmology, mathematics, and philosophy to show that human thinking can never be emulated by a machine.
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  33.  24
    John Dewey (1931/1968). Philosophy and Civilization. Gloucester, Mass.,P. Smith.
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  34. William Barrett (1978). The Illusion of Technique: A Search for Meaning in a Technological Civilization. Anchor Press.
     
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  35. Albert Schweitzer (1961). Civilization and Ethics. Allen & Unwin Published in Association with Black.
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  36.  15
    William S. Robinson (1992). Computers, Minds, and Robots. Temple University Press.
  37. Hans Peter Duerr (1985). Dreamtime Concerning the Boundary Between Wilderness and Civilization.
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  38.  33
    Gerhard Endress, Rüdiger Arnzen & J. Thielmann (eds.) (2004). Words, Texts, and Concepts Cruising the Mediterranean Sea: Studies on the Sources, Contents and Influences of Islamic Civilization and Arabic Philosophy and Science: Dedicated to Gerhard Endress on His Sixty-Fifth Birthday. Peeters.
    This statement by the late Franz Rosenthal is, in a sense, the uniting theme of the present volume's 35 articles by renowned scholars of Islamic Studies, Middle ...
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  39.  2
    William Ernest Hocking (1958). The Coming World Civilization. Philosophical Review 67 (3):409-411.
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  40.  21
    V. M. Mezhujev (1993). Marxism in the Context of the History of Civilization and Culture. Studies in East European Thought 45 (1-2):23 - 35.
  41.  15
    Randall R. Dipert (2002). The Substantive Impact of Computers on Philosophy: Prolegomena to a Computational and Information-Theoretic Metaphysics. In James Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (eds.), Metaphilosophy. Blackwell Pub. 146-157.
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  42.  4
    A. H. Johnson (1962). Whitehead's Philosophy of Civilization. New York, Dover Publications.
  43.  2
    Iulia Grad (2010). A Christian Philosophical Perspective on Western Civilization. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (25):192-194.
    Emil Brunner, Christianity and Civilisation. Foundations and Specific Problems. Cambridge: James Clarke & Co. 2009.
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  44. Jacques Maritain (1946). The Twilight of Civilization. London, Sheed & Ward.
    The crisis of modern humanism. The great anti-Christian forces. The gospel and the pagan empire. Christianity and democracy.
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  45.  9
    V. S. Stepin (1993). The Fate of Marxism and the Future of Civilization. Studies in East European Thought 45 (1-2):117 - 133.
  46.  1
    G. P. Adams, W. R. Dennes, J. Loewenberg, D. S. Mackay, P. Marhenke & S. C. Pepper (1938). Knowledge and Society: A Philosophical Approach to Modern Civilization. Journal of Philosophy 35 (17):466-470.
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  47.  1
    Benjamin Kidd (1904). Principles of Western Civilization. Philosophical Review 13 (2):247-249.
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  48.  1
    Roy Rada (1991). Computers and Gradualness: The Selfish Meme. [REVIEW] AI and Society 5 (3):246-254.
    In making a contribution, a person's life gains meaning. A small contribution affects a few people for a short time, while a large contribution affects many people for a long time. Within the framework of an abstract, computational world, a metric on contributions is defined. Simulation of the computational model shows the critical role of gradualness. Gradualness can be supported by human-computer systems in which the computer does the copying and arithmetic, and the human applies a rich understanding of the (...)
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  49.  4
    E. M. Adams (1975). Philosophy and the Modern Mind: A Philosophical Critique of Modern Western Civilization. University of North Carolina Press.
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  50. Brooks Adams (1975). The Law of Civilization and Decay: An Essay on History. Gordon Press.
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