Search results for 'Conceptualization' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rajesh Kasturirangan, Nirmalya Guha & Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad (2011). Indian Cognitivism and the Phenomenology of Conceptualization. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):277-296.score: 18.0
    We perform conceptual acts throughout our daily lives; we are always judging others, guessing their intentions, agreeing or opposing their views and so on. These conceptual acts have phenomenological as well as formal richness. This paper attempts to correct the imbalance between the phenomenal and formal approaches to conceptualization by claiming that we need to shift from the usual dichotomies of cognitive science and epistemology such as the formal/empirical and the rationalist/empiricist divides—to a view of conceptualization grounded in (...)
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  2. Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad (2011). Indian Cognitivism and the Phenomenology of Conceptualization. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):277-296.score: 18.0
    We perform conceptual acts throughout our daily lives; we are always judging others, guessing their intentions, agreeing or opposing their views and so on. These conceptual acts have phenomenological as well as formal richness. This paper attempts to correct the imbalance between the phenomenal and formal approaches to conceptualization by claiming that we need to shift from the usual dichotomies of cognitive science and epistemology such as the formal/empirical and the rationalist/empiricist divides—to a view of conceptualization grounded in (...)
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  3. Tyler Marghetis & Rafael Núñez (2013). The Motion Behind the Symbols: A Vital Role for Dynamism in the Conceptualization of Limits and Continuity in Expert Mathematics. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (2):299-316.score: 16.0
    The canonical history of mathematics suggests that the late 19th-century “arithmetization” of calculus marked a shift away from spatial-dynamic intuitions, grounding concepts in static, rigorous definitions. Instead, we argue that mathematicians, both historically and currently, rely on dynamic conceptualizations of mathematical concepts like continuity, limits, and functions. In this article, we present two studies of the role of dynamic conceptual systems in expert proof. The first is an analysis of co-speech gesture produced by mathematics graduate students while proving a theorem, (...)
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  4. Reshef Agam‐Segal (2014). When Language Gives Out: Conceptualization, and Aspect‐Seeing as a Form of Judgment. Metaphilosophy 45 (1):41-68.score: 16.0
    This article characterizes aspect-perception as a distinct form of judgment in Kant's sense: a distinct way in which the mind contacts world and applies concepts. First, aspect-perception involves a mode of thinking about things apart from any established routine of conceptualizing them. It is thus a form of concept application that is essentially reflection about language. Second, this mode of reflection has an experiential, sometimes perceptual, element: in aspect-perception, that is, we experience meanings—bodies of norms. Third, aspect-perception can be “preparatory”: (...)
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  5. Joachim F. Wohlwill (1957). The Abstraction and Conceptualization of Form, Color, and Number. Journal of Experimental Psychology 53 (5):304.score: 15.0
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  6. Lawrence C. Hartlage (1969). Verbal Tests of Spatial Conceptualization. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (1):180.score: 15.0
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  7. Cedric Dawkins (2010). Beyond Wages and Working Conditions: A Conceptualization of Labor Union Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):129 - 143.score: 12.0
    This article integrates theory and concepts from the business and society, business ethics, and labor relations literatures to offer a conceptualization of labor union social responsibility that includes activities geared toward three primary objectives: economic equity, workplace democracy, and social justice. Economic, workplace, and social labor union stakeholders are identified, likely issues are highlighted, and the implications of labor union social responsibility for labor union strategy are discussed. It is noted that, given the breadth of labor unions in a (...)
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  8. Agustin Vicente & Fernando Martinez-Manrique (2013). The Influence of Language in Conceptualization: Three Views. Protosociology 20:89-106.score: 12.0
    Different languages carve the world in different categories. They also encode events in different ways, conventionalize different metaphorical mappings, and differ in their rule-based metonymies and patterns of meaning extensions. A long-standing, and controversial, question is whether this variability in the languages generates a corresponding variability in the conceptual structure of the speakers of those languages. Here we will present and discuss three interesting general proposals by focusing on representative authors of such proposals. The proposals are the following: first, that (...)
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  9. Amy Coplan (2011). Will the Real Empathy Please Stand Up? A Case for a Narrow Conceptualization. Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (s1):40-65.score: 12.0
    A longstanding problem with the study of empathy is the lack of a clear and agreed upon definition. A trend in the recent literature is to respond to this problem by advancing a broad and all-encompassing view of empathy that applies to myriad processes ranging from mimicry and imitation to high-level perspective taking. I argue that this response takes us in the wrong direction and that what we need in order to better understand empathy is a narrower conceptualization, not (...)
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  10. Sandro Castaldo, Katia Premazzi & Fabrizio Zerbini (2010). The Meaning(s) of Trust. A Content Analysis on the Diverse Conceptualizations of Trust in Scholarly Research on Business Relationships. Journal of Business Ethics 96 (4):657 - 668.score: 12.0
    Scholarly research largely converges on the argument that trust is of paramount importance to drive economic agents toward mutually satisfactory, fair, and ethically compliant behaviors. There is, however, little agreement on the meaning of trust, whose conceptualizations differ with respect to actors, relationships, behaviors, and contexts. At present, we know much better what trust does than what trust is. In this article, we present an extensive review and analysis of the most prominent articles on trust in market relationships. Using computer-aided (...)
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  11. Aanand D. Naik, Carmel B. Dyer, Mark E. Kunik & Laurence B. McCullough (2009). Patient Autonomy for the Management of Chronic Conditions: A Two-Component Re-Conceptualization. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (2):23 – 30.score: 12.0
    The clinical application of the concept of patient autonomy has centered on the ability to deliberate and make treatment decisions (decisional autonomy) to the virtual exclusion of the capacity to execute the treatment plan (executive autonomy). However, the one-component concept of autonomy is problematic in the context of multiple chronic conditions. Adherence to complex treatments commonly breaks down when patients have functional, educational, and cognitive barriers that impair their capacity to plan, sequence, and carry out tasks associated with chronic care. (...)
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  12. Tomás F. González & Manuel Guillén (2008). Organizational Commitment: A Proposal for a Wider Ethical Conceptualization of 'Normative Commitment'. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 78 (3):401 - 414.score: 12.0
    Conceptualization and measurement of organizational commitment involve different dimensions that include economic, affective, as well as moral aspects labelled in the literature as: ‘continuance’, ‘affective’ and ‘normative’ commitment. This multidimensional framework emerges from the convergence of different research lines. Using Aristotle’s philosophical framework, that explicitly considers the role of the will in human commitment, it is proposed a rational explanation of the existence of mentioned dimensions in organizational commitment. Such a theoretical proposal may offer a more accurate definition (...)
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  13. Mioara Mugur-Schächter (1993). From Quantum Mechanics to Universal Structures of Conceptualization and Feedback on Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 23 (1):37-122.score: 12.0
    In previous works we have established that the spacetime probabilistic organization of the quantum theory is determined by the spacetime characteristics of the operations by which the observer produces the objects to be studied (“states” of microsystems) and obtains qualifications of these. Guided by this first conclusion, we have then built a “general syntax of relativized conceptualization” where any description is explicitly and systematically referred to the two basic epistemic operations by which the conceptor introduces the object to be (...)
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  14. Neelke Doorn (2011). Conceptualization or Assessment: One at a Time or Both? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (2):153-155.score: 12.0
    I am very grateful to Toby Williamson and Ajit Shah for their insightful commentaries on my paper on mental competence. By linking their commentaries to the Mental Capacity Act of 2005, they both reflect a strong embeddedness in clinical practice, which I very much appreciate. Both authors seem, more or less, to agree on the need for an anthropological conceptualization of mental competence beyond a rather “mechanistic decision-making ability.” However, they do disagree on the pace (Williamson) and direction (Shah) (...)
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  15. Omar Lizardo (2013). Re‐Conceptualizing Abstract Conceptualization in Social Theory: The Case of the “Structure” Concept. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 43 (2):155-180.score: 12.0
    I this paper, I draw on recent research on the radically embodied and perceptual bases of conceptualization in linguistics and cognitive science to develop a new way of reading and evaluating abstract concepts in social theory. I call this approach Sociological Idea Analysis. I argue that, in contrast to the traditional view of abstract concepts, which conceives them as amodal “presuppositions” removed from experience, abstract concepts are irreducibly grounded in experience and partake of non-negotiable perceptual-symbolic features from which a (...)
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  16. Gilles Fauconnier (1999). Creativity, Simulation, and Conceptualization. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):615-615.score: 12.0
    Understanding the role of simulation in conceptualization has become a priority for cognitive science. Barsalou makes a valuable contribution in that direction. The present commentary points to theoretical issues that need to be refined and elaborated in order to account for key aspects of meaning construction, such as negation, counterfactuals, quantification or analogy. Backstage cognition, with its elaborate bindings, blendings, and mappings, is more complex than Barsalou's discussion might suggest. Language does not directly carry meaning, but rather serves, along (...)
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  17. Gi-Du Kang & Jeffrey James (2007). Revisiting the Concept of a Societal Orientation: Conceptualization and Delineation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 73 (3):301 - 318.score: 12.0
    Marketers have traditionally evaluated products and practices on the basis of whether something could be sold. It is also important to evaluate products and practices from a societal perspective, "Should a product be sold?" The first idea reflects a managerial orientation and what must be done to sell a product; the second idea reflects a societal orientation and the impact of selling a product. In relation to the second idea, the societal marketing concept was introduced in 1972. There has been (...)
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  18. Hong-Gee Kim (1997). A Psychologically Plausible Logical Model of Conceptualization. Minds and Machines 7 (2):249-267.score: 12.0
    This paper discusses how we understand and use a concept or the meaningof a general term to identify the objects falling under the term. There aretwo distinct approaches to research on the problems of concepts and meaningthe psychological approach and the formal (or logical) approach. My majorconcern is to consider the possibility of reconciling these two differentapproaches, and for this I propose to build a psychologically plausibleformal system of conceptualization. That is, I will develop a theory-basedaccount of concepts and (...)
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  19. Bill LaBauve & Kimberly Rynearson (2001). The Impact of Conceptualization Skills in Counseling Children. Inquiry 20 (3):33-38.score: 12.0
    This article addresses the importance of client conceptualization skills in counseling as well as the limitations of child conceptualization skills in counseling. Furthermore, the article provides a rough overview of the applicable points in Piaget’s theory of cognitive development and a discussion of how these points relate to conceptualization skills in counseling.
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  20. Melinda A. García (1995). Responsibility Versus Defensiveness: Inclusion of Ethnicity in the Conceptualization of Theory. Ethics and Behavior 5 (4):373 – 375.score: 12.0
    (1995). Responsibility Versus Defensiveness: Inclusion of Ethnicity in the Conceptualization of Theory. Ethics & Behavior: Vol. 5, No. 4, pp. 373-375.
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  21. Stan Franklin (1997). Action Patterns, Conceptualization, and Artificial Intelligence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):23-24.score: 12.0
    This commentary connects some of Glenberg's ideas to similar ideas from artificial intelligence. Second, it briefly discusses hidden assumptions relating to meaning, representations, and projectable properties. Finally, questions about mechanisms, mental imagery, and conceptualization in animals are posed.
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  22. C. Trumpp, J. Endrikat, C. Zopf & E. Guenther (2013). Definition, Conceptualization, and Measurement of Corporate Environmental Performance: A Critical Examination of a Multidimensional Construct. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.score: 12.0
    Corporate environmental performance (CEP) has been of fundamental interest in scholarly research during the last few decades. However, there is a great deal of disagreement pertaining to the definition, conceptualization, and adequate measurement of CEP. Our study addresses these issues and provides a methodologically rigorous and comprehensive examination of content validity and construct validity. By integrating the available literature on CEP, we derive a parsimonious definition and theoretically sound framework of the focal construct. Drawing on non-aggregated and publicly available (...)
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  23. Paul Katsafanas (2005). Nietzsche's Theory of Mind: Consciousness and Conceptualization. European Journal of Philosophy 13 (1):1–31.score: 10.0
    I show that Nietzsche's puzzling and seemingly inconsistent claims about consciousness constitute a coherent and philosophically fruitful theory. Drawing on some ideas from Schopenhauer and F.A. Lange, Nietzsche argues that conscious mental states are mental states with conceptually articulated content, whereas unconscious mental states are mental states with non-conceptually articulated content. Nietzsche's views on concepts imply that conceptually articulated mental states will be superficial and in some cases distorting analogues of non-conceptually articulated mental states. Thus, the claim that conscious states (...)
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  24. Mark Andrew DeBellis (1995). Music and Conceptualization. Cambridge University Press.score: 10.0
    This book is a philosophical study of the relations between hearing and thinking about music. The central problem it addresses is as follows: how is it possible to talk about what a listener perceives in terms that the listener does not recognise? By applying the concepts and techniques of analytic philosophy the author explores the ways in which musical hearing may be described as nonconceptual, and how such mental representation contrasts with conceptual thought. The author is both philosopher and musicologist (...)
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  25. Eleanor R. E. O.’Higgins (2010). Corporations, Civil Society, and Stakeholders: An Organizational Conceptualization. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):157 - 176.score: 10.0
    This article presents a descriptive conceptual framework comprising four different company configurations with respect to orientations toward corporate social responsibility (CSR). The four types are Skeptical, Pragmatic, Engaged, and Idealistic. The framework is grounded in instrumental and normative stakeholder theory, and a company's configuration is based on its instrumental and/or normative stance toward stakeholders. Its configuration indicates what position a company adopts in relation to CSR. This article argues that there is no one formula to fit all companies, descriptively or (...)
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  26. Simon Lumsden (2003). Satisfying the Demands of Reason: Hegel's Conceptualization of Experience. Topoi 22 (1):41-53.score: 10.0
    Hegel had taken the Kantian categories of thought to be merely formal, without content, since, he argued, Kant abstracted the conditions of thought from the world. The Kantian categories can, as such, only be understood subjectively and so are unable to secure a content for themselves. Hegel, following Fichte, tried to provide a content for the logical categories. In order to reinstate an objective status for logic and conceptuality he tries to affirm the unity of thought and being. The idea (...)
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  27. Krzysztof Brzechczyn (2007). Paths to Democracy of the Post-Soviet Republics: Attempt at Conceptualization. In Ewa Czerwińska-Schupp (ed.), Values and Norms in the Age of Globalization. Peter Lang. 1--30.score: 10.0
    The paper conceptualizes five basic developmental paths the post-Soviet republics followed. The conceptual framework of this paper is expanded theory of real socialism in non-Marxian historical materialism, namely proposed the model of secession from socialist empire. The first developmental path was followed by societies in which an independent civil revolution took place. This path of development bifurcates into two furhter sub-variants. Namely civil revolutions in the Baltic republics (Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia) resulted in the independence and stable democracies. Civil revolution in (...)
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  28. Svend Østergaard (2004). The Conceptualization of Processes. Axiomathes 14 (1-3):77-96.score: 10.0
    There are various sources of the human conceptual system that pertain to causation. According to the realism of René Thom the attention network is attuned to existing patterns of singularities in space/time. According to cognitive linguistics the conceptual system is determined by the neural wiring and the embodied experience of the cognizer. Our concepts do therefore not necessarily reflect objective properties of space and time. In this paper I discuss the two positions and their relation. Following Len Talmy, I present (...)
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  29. Fahri Karakas & Emine Sarigollu (2012). Benevolent Leadership: Conceptualization and Construct Development. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (4):537 - 553.score: 10.0
    This research examines benevolent leadership and makes three key contributions to organizational research. The first contribution is a theoretical one; the development of a theory-grounded conceptual model of benevolent leadership based on four streams of creating common good in organizations: morality, spirituality, vitality, and community. The second contribution is the development of an instrument (Benevolent Leadership Scale) to measure the construct of benevolent leadership. This scale is composed of four dimensions: Ethical Sensitivity, Spiritual Depth, Positive Engagement, and Community Responsiveness. The (...)
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  30. Ewald Lang (1990). Primary Perceptual Space and Inherent Proportion Schema: Two Interacting Categorization Grids Underlying the Conceptualization of Spatial Objects. Journal of Semantics 7 (2):121-141.score: 10.0
    Within the realms of cognitive studies, spatial structure is one of the few domains where attempts to trace mental representations from the level of sensory input conditions through conceptual structure to their lexical and grammatical organization seem to be feasible and revealing. Presenting a linguist's approach to the meaning and use of spatial dimensional terms, the paper aims to demonstrate why and how the semantic analysis of these linguistic items has to be justified in terms of nonlinguistic conceptual structure formation, (...)
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  31. Dale Cannon (2008). “Polanyi's Influence on Poteat's Conceptualization of Modernity's 'Insanity' and Its Cure. Tradition and Discovery 35 (2):23-30.score: 10.0
    My intent is to paint in rather broad strokes Bill Poteat’s intellectual agenda, as I came to understand it, and how Michael Polanyi fit into that agenda for Poteat alongside other major intellectual mentors. Bill’s agenda was to expose critically and, so far as possible, to counter the fateful consequences of what he called the “prepossessions of the European Enlightenment” regarding human knowing, human doing, and human being. Although his work involved conceptual analysis, the nature of this conceptual-archaeology was far (...)
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  32. Linda C. Rodríguez & Ivan Montiel (2011). A Conceptualization of How Firms Invest in CSR Based on Country Risk. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:309-315.score: 10.0
    We look at the relationship of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and country risk. We conceptualize the relationship first by asking if there is a correlationand then positing the directionality of the relationship. We posit that there is an inverse or negative correlation of implicit CSR with country risk and a positive correlation between explicit CSR and country risk. Understanding this relationship can help firms respond to a variety of external pressures such as those from activist organizations and stockholder disciplining; thus, (...)
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  33. Sonia Sedivy (2004). Wittgenstein's Diagnosis of Empiricism's Third Dogma: Why Perception is Not an Amalgam of Sensation and Conceptualization. Philosophical Investigations 27 (1):1-33.score: 9.0
  34. Mark A. Wrathall (2005). Non-Rational Grounds and Non-Conceptual Content. Synthesis Philosophica 2 (40):265-278.score: 9.0
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  35. Hector-Neri Castaneda (1974). The Acceptance of Theories, Conceptual Analysis, and Other Minds. Philosophical Studies 26 (December):301-312.score: 9.0
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  36. J. I. Bakker (1990). The Gandhian Approach to Swadeshi or Appropriate Technology: A Conceptualization in Terms of Basic Needs and Equity. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 3 (1).score: 9.0
    This is an examination of the significance of Gandhi's social philosophy for development. It is argued that, when seen in light of Gandhi's social philosophy, the concepts of appropriate technology (A.T.) and basic needs take on new meaning. The Gandhian approach can be identified with theoriginal "basic needs" strategy for international development (Emmerij, 1981). Gandhi's approach helps to provide greater equity, or "distributive justice," by promoting technology that is appropriate to "basic needs" (food, clothing, shelter, health and basic education). (...)
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  37. Lawrence Grossberg (1982). Intersubjectivity and the Conceptualization of Communication. Human Studies 5 (1):213 - 235.score: 9.0
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  38. William Whisner (1993). Self-Deception and Other-Person Deception: A New Conceptualization of One Central Type of Self-Deception. Philosophia 22 (3-4):223-240.score: 9.0
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  39. Lisa Feldman Barrett (2005). Feeling is Perceiving: Core Affect and Conceptualization in the Experience of Emotion. In Lisa Feldman Barrett, Paula M. Niedenthal & Piotr Winkielman (eds.), Emotion and Consciousness. Guilford Press. 255-284.score: 9.0
  40. Mioara Mugur-Schächter (2002). Objectivity and Descriptional Relativities. Foundations of Science 7 (1-2):73-180.score: 9.0
    A general representation of the processesof conceptualization, founded upon adescriptional mould drawn from fundamentalquantum mechanics, is outlined. The approach iscalled the method of relativizedconceptualization. This stresses that therepresentation is not researched as a ``neutralstatement of facts'' but, from the start on, asa method subjected to definitedescriptional aims, namely an a prioriexclusion of the emergence of false problems orparadoxes and of any gliding into relativism.The method is characterized by an explicit andsystematic relativization of each descriptionalstep, to all the descriptional elementsinvolved (...)
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  41. Sandra Lancaster & Margaret Foddy (1988). Self-Extensions: A Conceptualization. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 18 (1):77–94.score: 9.0
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  42. Joseph Runzo (1982). The Radical Conceptualization of Perceptual Experience. American Philosophical Quarterly 19 (July):205-218.score: 9.0
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  43. R. Lippens (2001). Organizational Moralities and Social Transition: Towards a Conceptualization of Organizational Regulation in a Transitional Age. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 33 (3):211 - 223.score: 9.0
    This essay attempts to think through the impact of what we call our "transitional age" on organizational life, specifically on organizational regulation, and thus on organizational moral life. It provides notes towards a reconceptualization of organizational moral life that may be helpful to all students and practitioners of organization and business ethics who would want to make sense of the often significant contextuality, unpredictability, and undecidability of contemporary organizational life.
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  44. William N. Whisner (1993). Self-Deception and Other-Person Deception: Toward a New Conceptualization of Self- Deception. Philosophia 22 (3-4):223-240.score: 9.0
     
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  45. Katalin Balog (2009). Jerry Fodor on Non-Conceptual Content. Synthese 167 (3):311 - 320.score: 6.0
    Proponents of non-conceptual content have recruited it for various philosophical jobs. Some epistemologists have suggested that it may play the role of “the given” that Sellars is supposed to have exorcised from philosophy. Some philosophers of mind (e.g., Dretske) have suggested that it plays an important role in the project of naturalizing semantics as a kind of halfway between merely information bearing and possessing conceptual content. Here I will focus on a recent proposal by Jerry Fodor. In a recent paper (...)
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  46. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2003). Concepts and Conceptual Analysis. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (2):253-282.score: 6.0
    Conceptual analysis is undergoing a revival in philosophy, and much of the credit goes to Frank Jackson. Jackson argues that conceptual analysis is needed as an integral component of so-called serious metaphysics and that it also does explanatory work in accounting for such phenomena as categorization, meaning change, communication, and linguistic understanding. He even goes so far as to argue that opponents of concep- tual analysis are implicitly committed to it in practice. We show that he is wrong on all (...)
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  47. Laura Schroeter (2004). The Limits of Conceptual Analysis. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (4):425-453.score: 6.0
    It would be nice if good old a priori conceptual analysis were possible. For many years conceptual analysis was out of fashion, in large part because of the excessive ambitions of verificationist theories of meaning._ _However, those days are over._ _A priori conceptual analysis is once again part of the philosophical mainstream._ _This renewed popularity, moreover, is well-founded. Modern philosophical analysts have exploited developments in philosophical semantics to formulate analyses which avoid the counterintuitive consequences of verificationism, while vindicating our ability (...)
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  48. Hans-Johann Glock (2009). Concepts, Conceptual Schemes and Grammar. Philosophia 37 (4):653-668.score: 6.0
    This paper considers the connection between concepts, conceptual schemes and grammar in Wittgenstein’s last writings. It lists eight claims about concepts that one can garner from these writings. It then focuses on one of them, namely that there is an important difference between conceptual and factual problems and investigations. That claim draws in its wake other claims, all of them revolving around the idea of a conceptual scheme, what Wittgenstein calls a ‘grammar’. I explain why Wittgenstein’s account does not fall (...)
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  49. Brie Gertler (2002). Explanatory Reduction, Conceptual Analysis, and Conceivability Arguments About the Mind. Noûs 36 (1):22-49.score: 6.0
    My aim here is threefold: (a) to show that conceptual facts play a more significant role in justifying explanatory reductions than most of the contributors to the current debate realize; (b) to furnish an account of that role, and (c) to trace the consequences of this account for conceivability arguments about the mind.
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  50. Gabor Forrai (2009). Brandom on Two Problems of Conceptual Role Semantics. In Barbara Merker (ed.), Vertehen nach Heidegger und Brandom.score: 6.0
    The paper examines how Brandom can respond to two objections raised against another sort of inferentialism, conceptual role semantics. After a brief explanation of the difference between the motivations and the nature of the two accounts (I), I argue that externalism can be accommodated within Brandomian inferentialism (II). Then I offer a reconstruction of how Brandom tries to explain mutual understanding (III-IV). Finally I point out a problem in Brandom’s account, which is this. Brandom’s inferential roles are social and normative, (...)
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