Search results for 'Conclusion Iii' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  5
    Samuel C. Wheeler Iii (1984). The Conclusion of the Theaetetus. History of Philosophy Quarterly 1 (4):355 - 367.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  3
    Conclusion Iii, \Large {\Bf.
    PARANORMAL IS ABNORMAL ACTION OF MIND ON MATTER.\\ ONE NEEDS FIRST A THEORY OF NORMAL ACTION OF MIND ON MATTER.\\ CLASSICAL THEORY INADEQUATE: NO `MIND' IN THE DYNAMICS.\\ QUANTUM THEORY IS FORMULATED AS A THEORY OF MIND-MATTER INTERPLAY!\\ SIMPLER THAN CLASSICAL PHYSICS!\\ I SHALL:\\ 1. SHOW HOW QUANTUM THEORY OF MIND-MATTER IS CONSTRUCTED.\\ 2. DO TWO IMPORTANT MIND-MATTER CALCULATIONS.\\ 3. LOOK AT RAMIFICATIONS FOR PARANORMAL.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Philip Brey, Lee Caragata, James Dickinson, David Glidden, Sara Gottlieb, Bruce Hannon, Ian Howard, Jeff Malpas, Katya Mandoki, Jonathan Maskit, Bryan G. Norton, Roger Paden, David Roberts, Holmes Rolston Iii, Izhak Schnell, Jonathon M. Smith, David Wasserman & Mick Womersley (1998). Philosophy and Geography Iii: Philosophies of Place. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    A growing literature testifies to the persistence of place as an incorrigible aspect of human experience, identity, and morality. Place is a common ground for thought and action, a community of experienced particulars that avoids solipsism and universalism. It draws us into the philosophy of the ordinary, into familiarity as a form of knowledge, into the wisdom of proximity. Each of these essays offers a philosophy of place, and reminds us that such philosophies ultimately decide how we make, use, and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  4. R. W. H., E. Kunze & Orchomenos Iii (1935). Orchomenos III: die Keramik der fruhen Bronzezeit. Journal of Hellenic Studies 55:86.
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  16
    Ruth Thomas, Katherine Whybrow & Cassandra Scharber (2011). A Conceptual Exploration of Participation. Section III: Utilitarian Perspectives and Conclusion. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (8):801-817.
    This is the third section of an article (each published in subsequent regular issues of EPAT) that explores the concept of participation. Section I: Introduction and Early Perspectives grounds our exploration of participation and explores definitions and early perspectives of participation we have identified as ‘historically original’ and ‘philosophical’. Section II: Participation as Engagement in Experience—An Aesthetics Perspective is a continuation of our conceptual exploration of participation that digs into the world of aesthetics. Finally, Section III: The Utilitarian Perspective and (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  12
    A. W. Pickard (1940). The Conclusion of Zeus A. B. Cook: Zeus, a Study in Ancient Religion. Volume III, Zeus, God of the Dark Sky. Two Vols. (Part I, Text and Notes: Part II, Appendixes and Index). Pp. Xxx+1299; 83 Plates; 932 Figures. Cambridge: University Press, 1940. Cloth, £8. 8s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (04):209-213.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  15
    D. J. Shoesmith (1978). Multiple-Conclusion Logic. Cambridge University Press.
    Multiple -conclusion logic extends formal logic by allowing arguments to have a set of conclusions instead of a single one, the truth lying somewhere among the conclusions if all the premises are true. The extension opens up interesting possibilities based on the symmetry between premises and conclusions, and can also be used to throw fresh light on the conventional logic and its limitations. This is a sustained study of the subject and is certain to stimulate further research. Part I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   52 citations  
  8. Sergio Tenenbaum (2012). The Idea of Freedom and Moral Cognition in Groundwork III. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 84 (3):555-589.
    Kant’s views on the relation between freedom and moral law seem to undergo a major, unannounced shift. In the third section of the Groundwork, Kant seems to be using the fact that we must act under the idea of freedom as a foundation for the moral law. However, in the Critique of Practical Reason, Kant claims that our awareness of our freedom depends on our awareness of the moral law. I argue that the apparent conflict between the two texts depends (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  6
    J. J. Tuech (2005). Methodological Quality and Reporting of Ethical Requirements in Phase III Cancer Trials. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (5):251-255.
    Background: The approval of a research ethics committee and obtaining informed consent from patients could be considered the main issues in the ethics of research with human beings. The aim of this study was to assess both methodological quality and ethical quality, and also to assess the relationship between these two qualities in randomised phase III cancer trials.Method: Methodological quality and ethical quality were assessed for all randomised controlled trials published in 10 international journals between 1999 and 2001 .Results: The (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  25
    Jeanine Grenberg (2009). The Phenomenological Failure of Groundwork III. Inquiry 52 (4):335 – 356.
    Henry Allison and Paul Guyer have recently offered interpretations of Kant's argument in Groundwork III. These interpretations share this premise: the argument moves from a non-moral, theoretical premise to a moral conclusion, and the failure of the argument is a failure to make this jump from the non-moral to the moral. This characterization both of the nature of the argument and its failure is flawed. Consider instead the possibility that in Groundwork III, Kant is struggling toward something rather different (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  23
    Richard Scheines, Estimating Latent Causal Influences: Tetrad III Variable Selection and Bayesian Parameter Estimation.
    The statistical evidence for the detrimental effect of exposure to low levels of lead on the cognitive capacities of children has been debated for several decades. In this paper I describe how two techniques from artificial intelligence and statistics help make the statistical evidence for the accepted epidemiological conclusion seem decisive. The first is a variable-selection routine in TETRAD III for finding causes, and the second a Bayesian estimation of the parameter reflecting the causal influence of Actual Lead Exposure, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  2
    L. Lawlor (2005). Un Ecart Infime (Part III): The Blind Spot in Foucault. Philosophy and Social Criticism 31 (5-6):665-685.
    This article is the third part of a trilogy investigating the relation between Merleau-Ponty and Foucault. All three essays are inspired by Foucault’s diagnosis of our epoch in terms of biopower. They therefore aim at the creation of a new concept of life. In ‘Un Ecart Infime (Part III)’, I lay out Foucault’s analysis, from the first chapter of The Order of Things, of Velázquez’s painting, Las Meninas. By stressing what Foucault says about the ‘sagittal lines’ exiting the painting, one (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  2
    Peter B. M. Vranas (2016). New Foundations for Imperative Logic III: A General Definition of Argument Validity. Synthese 193 (6):1703-1753.
    Besides pure declarative arguments, whose premises and conclusions are declaratives, and pure imperative arguments, whose premises and conclusions are imperatives, there are mixed-premise arguments, whose premises include both imperatives and declaratives, and cross-species arguments, whose premises are declaratives and whose conclusions are imperatives or vice versa. I propose a general definition of argument validity: an argument is valid exactly if, necessarily, every fact that sustains its premises also sustains its conclusion, where a fact sustains an imperative exactly if it (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Anthony Greenwald, On Doing Two Things at Once: III. Confirmation of Perfect Timesharing When Simultaneous Tasks Are Ideomotor Compatible.
    A. G. Greenwald and H. G. Shulman (1973) found that 2 tasks characterized by ideomotor (IM) compatibility could be perfectly timeshared (i.e., performed simultaneously without mutual interference). The 2 tasks were pronouncing “A” or “B” in response to hearing those letter names, and making a manual left or right response to seeing a left- or right-positioned arrow. M.-C. Lien, R. W. Proctor, and P. A. Allen (2002) did not replicate Greenwald and Shulman’s result, and concluded that their finding of perfect (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  68
    Peter B. M. Vranas (2012). New Foundations for Imperative Logic Iii: A General Definition of Argument Validity. Manuscript in Preparation.
    Besides pure declarative arguments, whose premises and conclusions are declaratives (“you sinned shamelessly; so you sinned”), and pure imperative arguments, whose premises and conclusions are imperatives (“repent quickly; so repent”), there are mixed-premise arguments, whose premises include both imperatives and declaratives (“if you sinned, repent; you sinned; so repent”), and cross-species arguments, whose premises are declaratives and whose conclusions are imperatives (“you must repent; so repent”) or vice versa (“repent; so you can repent”). I propose a general definition of argument (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Luciano Floridi (2008). The Method of Levels of Abstraction. Minds and Machines 18 (3):303-329.
    The use of “levels of abstraction” in philosophical analysis (levelism) has recently come under attack. In this paper, I argue that a refined version of epistemological levelism should be retained as a fundamental method, called the method of levels of abstraction. After a brief introduction, in section “Some Definitions and Preliminary Examples” the nature and applicability of the epistemological method of levels of abstraction is clarified. In section “A Classic Application of the Method ofion”, the philosophical fruitfulness of the new (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   38 citations  
  17.  47
    Ruth Chang (2016). Parity, Imprecise Comparability, and the Repugnant Conclusion. Theoria 82 (2):183-215.
    This article explores the main similarities and differences between Derek Parfit’s notion of imprecise comparability and a related notion I have proposed of parity. I argue that the main difference between imprecise comparability and parity can be understood by reference to ‘the standard view’. The standard view claims that 1) differences between cardinally ranked items can always be measured by a scale of units of the relevant value, and 2) all rankings proceed in terms of the trichotomy of ‘better than’, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  45
    Kelly Oliver (2009). Animal Lessons: How They Teach Us to Be Human. Columbia University Press.
    Introduction: The role of animals in philosophies of man -- Part I: What's wrong with animal rights? -- The right to remain silent -- Part II: Animal pedagogy -- You are what you eat : Rousseau's cat -- Say the human responded : Herder's sheep -- Part III: Difference worthy of its name -- Hair of the dog : Derrida's and Rousseau's good taste -- Sexual difference, animal difference : Derrida's sexy silkworm -- Part IV: It's our fault -- The (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  19.  20
    Matthew C. Halteman & Megan Halteman Zwart (2016). "Philosophy as Therapy for Recovering (Unrestrained) Omnivores". In Andrew Chignell, Terence Cuneo, and Matthew C. Halteman, eds., Philosophy Comes to Dinner: Arguments about the Ethics of Eating, New York: Routledge, 2016.
    Recourse to a variety of well-constructed arguments is undoubtedly a significant strategic asset for cultivating more ethical eating habits and convincing others to follow suit. Nevertheless, common obstacles often prevent even the best arguments from getting traction in our lives. For one thing, many of us enter the discussion hampered by firmly-entrenched but largely uninvestigated assumptions about food that make it difficult to imagine how even well-supported arguments that challenge our familiar frames of culinary reference could actually apply to us. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Stephen Engstrom (2009). The Form of Practical Knowledge: A Study of the Categorical Imperative. Harvard University Press.
    Introduction -- Part I: Willing as practical knowing -- The will and practical judgment -- Fundamental practical judgments : the wish for happiness -- Part II: From presuppositions of judgment to the idea of a categorical imperative -- The formal presuppositions of practical judgment -- Constraints on willing -- Part III: Interpretation -- The categorical imperative -- Applications -- Conclusion.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  21. G. Piccinini & J. Garson (2014). Functions Must Be Performed at Appropriate Rates in Appropriate Situations. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 65 (1):1-20.
    We sketch a novel and improved version of Boorse’s biostatistical theory of functions. Roughly, our theory maintains that (i) functions are non-negligible contributions to survival or inclusive fitness (when a trait contributes to survival or inclusive fitness); (ii) situations appropriate for the performance of a function are typical situations in which a trait contributes to survival or inclusive fitness; (iii) appropriate rates of functioning are rates that make adequate contributions to survival or inclusive fitness (in situations appropriate for the performance (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  22. Anders Nes (2016). The Sense of Natural Meaning in Conscious Inference. In T. Breyer & C. Gutland (eds.), Phenomenology of Thinking. Routledge 97-115.
    The paper addresses the phenomenology of inference. It proposes that the conscious character of conscious inferences is partly constituted by a sense of meaning; specifically, a sense of what Grice called ‘natural meaning’. In consciously drawing the (outright, categorical) conclusion that Q from a presumed fact that P, one senses the presumed fact that P as meaning that Q, where ‘meaning that’ expresses natural meaning. This sense of natural meaning is phenomenologically analogous, I suggest, to our sense of what (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23.  22
    Jessica Dawn Moss (2012). Aristotle on the Apparent Good: Perception, Phantasia, Thought, and Desire. Oxford University Press.
    Pt. I. The apparent good. Evaluative cognition -- Perceiving the good -- Phantasia and the apparent good -- pt. II. The apparent good and non-rational motivation. Passions and the apparent good -- Akrasia and the apparent good -- pt. III. The apparent good and rational motivation. Phantasia and deliberation -- Happiness, virtue, and the apparent good -- Practical induction -- Conclusion : Aristotle's practical empiricism.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  24. Jeffrey A. Barrett (2011). On the Faithful Interpretation of Pure Wave Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (4):693-709.
    Given Hugh Everett III's understanding of the proper cognitive status of physical theories, his relative-state formulation of pure wave mechanics arguably qualifies as an empirically acceptable physical theory. The argument turns on the precise nature of the relationship that Everett requires between the empirical substructure of an empirically faithful physical theory and experience. On this view, Everett provides a weak resolution to both the determinate record and the probability problems encountered by pure wave mechanics, and does so in a way (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  25.  50
    Ian Rumfitt (2014). I—Truth and Meaning. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 88 (1):21-55.
    Should we explicate truth in terms of meaning, or meaning in terms of truth? Ramsey, Prior and Strawson all favoured the former approach: a statement is true if and only if things are as the speaker, in making the statement, states them to be; similarly, a belief is true if and only if things are as a thinker with that belief thereby believes them to be. I defend this explication of truth against a range of objections. Ramsey formalized this account (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  26.  57
    C. A. Hooker (2004). Asymptotics, Reduction and Emergence. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (3):435-479.
    All the major inter-theoretic relations of fundamental science are asymptotic ones, e.g. quantum theory as Planck's constant h 0, yielding (roughly) Newtonian mechanics. Thus asymptotics ultimately grounds claims about inter-theoretic explanation, reduction and emergence. This paper examines four recent, central claims by Batterman concerning asymptotics and reduction. While these claims are criticised, the discussion is used to develop an enriched, dynamically-based account of reduction and emergence, to show its capacity to illuminate the complex variety of inter-theory relationships in physics, and (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  27.  6
    Leland De la Durantaye (2009). Giorgio Agamben: A Critical Introduction. Stanford University Press.
    Introduction : the idea of potentiality -- Art for art's sake. The destruction of aesthetics and the man without content (1970) -- A general science of the human. Stanzas : word and phantasm in western culture (1977) -- A critique of the dialectic. Infancy and history : the destruction of experience (1978) -- The pure potentiality of representation. Idea of prose (1985) -- From spectacle to shekinah : the coming community (1990) -- The potential of paradigms. Homo sacer : sovereign (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  28.  24
    Frédéric Vandenberghe (2009). A Philosophical History of German Sociology. Routledge.
    Introduction -- 1e Intermed consid -- Marx -- Simmel -- Weber -- Lukács -- 2e intermed consid -- Horkheimer -- Adorno -- 3e intermed consid -- Habermas I -- Habermas II -- Habermas III -- Conclusion -- Postscript -- Bibliography.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  29.  30
    Luca Castagnoli (2010). Ancient Self-Refutation: The Logic and History of the Self-Refutation Argument From Democritus to Augustine. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Truth, Falsehood and Self-Refutation: 1. Preliminaries; 2. A modern approach: Mackie on the absolute self-refutation of 'nothing is true'; 3. Setting the ancient stage: Dissoi Logoi 4.6; 4. Self-refutation and dialectic: Plato; 5. Speaking to Antiphasis: Aristotle; 6. Introducing peritroph: Sextus Empiricus; 7. Augustine's turn; 8. Interim conclusions; Part II. Pragmatic, Ad Hominem and Operational Self-Refutation: 9. Epicurus against the determinist: blame and reversal; 10. Anti-sceptical dilemmas: pragmatic or ad hominem self-refutations?; 11. Must (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  30. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2013). Spinoza's Metaphysics: Substance and Thought. Oxford University Press.
    This book is comprised of two parts. The first four chapters concentrate on the metaphysics of substance, while the last two address Spinoza’s metaphysics of thought. These two parts are closely connected, and several crucial claims in the last two chapters rely on arguments advanced in the first four. I intentionally use the term ‘metaphysics of thought’ rather than ‘philosophy of mind’ for two main reasons. First, the domain of thought in Spinoza is far more extensive than anything associated with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  31.  17
    Peter Schroeder-Heister (2012). The Categorical and the Hypothetical: A Critique of Some Fundamental Assumptions of Standard Semantics. Synthese 187 (3):925-942.
    The hypothetical notion of consequence is normally understood as the transmission of a categorical notion from premisses to conclusion. In model-theoretic semantics this categorical notion is 'truth', in standard proof-theoretic semantics it is 'canonical provability'. Three underlying dogmas, (I) the priority of the categorical over the hypothetical, (II) the transmission view of consequence, and (III) the identification of consequence and correctness of inference are criticized from an alternative view of proof-theoretic semantics. It is argued that consequence is a basic (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  32. Frank Arntzenius & Ned Hall (2003). On What We Know About Chance. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (2):171-179.
    The ‘Principal Principle’ states, roughly, that one's subjective probability for a proposition should conform to one's beliefs about that proposition's objective chance of coming true. David Lewis has argued (i) that this principle provides the defining role for chance; (ii) that it conflicts with his reductionist thesis of Humean supervenience, and so must be replaced by an amended version that avoids the conflict; hence (iii) that nothing perfectly deserves the name ‘chance’, although something can come close enough by playing the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  33. Lawrence B. Solum, Semantic Originalism.
    Semantic originalism is a theory of constitutional meaning that aims to disentangle the semantic, legal, and normative strands of debates in constitutional theory about the role of original meaning in constitutional interpretation and construction. This theory affirms four theses: (1) the fixation thesis, (2) the clause meaning thesis, (3) the contribution thesis, and (4) the fidelity thesis. -/- The fixation thesis claims that the semantic content of each constitutional provision is fixed at the time the provision is framed and ratified: (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  60
    Michael Moehler (2012). A Hobbesian Derivation of the Principle of Universalization. Philosophical Studies 158 (1):83-107.
    In this article, I derive a weak version of Kant's categorical imperative within an informal game-theoretic framework. More specifically, I argue that Hobbesian agents would choose what I call the weak principle of universalization, if they had to decide on a rule of conflict resolution in an idealized but empirically defensible hypothetical decision situation. The discussion clarifies (i) the rationality requirements imposed on agents, (ii) the empirical conditions assumed to warrant the conclusion, and (iii) the political institutions that are (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  35.  65
    Mylan Engel (2004). What's Wrong with Contextualism, and a Noncontextualist Resolution of the Skeptical Paradox. Erkenntnis 61 (2-3):203-231.
    Skeptics try to persuade us of our ignorance with arguments like the following: 1. I dont know that I am not a handless brain-in-a-vat [BIV]. 2. If I dont know that I am not a handless BIV, then I dont know that I have hands. Therefore, 3. I dont know that I have hands. The BIV argument is valid, its premises are intuitively compelling, and yet, its conclusion strikes us as absurd. Something has to go, but what? Contextualists contend (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  36. Graham Priest (1998). To Be and Not to Be - That is the Answer. On Aristotle on the Law of Non-Contradiction. Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 1.
    In Metaphysics III, Chapter 4, Aristotle sets out and defends the Law of Non-Contradiction. The arguments are, however, rather less satisfactory than one might have expected, given the enormous historical influence the text has had. His major argument is a particularly tangled one, and the others are often little more than throw-away remarks. This essay is a commentary on the chapter, but its aim is less to interpret the text , than to see whether there is anything that Aristotle could (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  37. Thomas Søbirk Petersen (2006). On the Repugnance of the Repugnant Conclusion. Theoria 72 (2):126-137.
    The aim of this paper is to discuss the plausibility of a certain position in the philosophical literature within which the Repugnant Conclusion is treated, not as repugnant, but as an acceptable implication of the total welfare principle. I will confine myself to focus primarily on Törbjörn Tännsjö’s presentation. First, I reconstruct Tännsjö’s view concerning the repugnance of the RC in two arguments. The first argument is criticized for (a) addressing the wrong comparison, (b) relying on the controversial claim (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Matthew Braddock (2013). Defusing the Demandingness Objection: Unreliable Intuitions. Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (2):169-191.
    Dogged resistance to demanding moral views frequently takes the form of The Demandingness Objection. Premise (1): Moral view V demands too much of us. Premise (2): If a moral view demands too much of us, then it is mistaken. Conclusion: Therefore, moral view V is mistaken. Objections of this form harass major theories in normative ethics as well as prominent moral views in applied ethics and political philosophy. The present paper does the following: (i) it clarifies and distinguishes between (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39. Dean Zimmerman (2010). The A-Theory of Time, Presentism, and Open Theism. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell 789--809.
    This chapter contains sections titled: * I Introduction * II A-Theories and B-Theories * III Competing Versions of the A-Theory * IV Presentism a Trivial Truth? * V Open Theism and the A-Theory of Time * VI The “Truthmaker” Argument * VII Conclusion * Notes.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  75
    Soran Reader & Gillian Brock (2004). Needs, Moral Demands and Moral Theory. Utilitas 16 (3):251-266.
    In this article we argue that the concept of need is as vital for moral theory as it is for moral life. In II we analyse need and its normativity in public and private moral practice. In III we describe simple cases which exemplify the moral demandingness of needs, and argue that the significance of simple cases for moral theory is obscured by the emphasis in moral philosophy on unusual cases. In IV we argue that moral theories are inadequate if (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  41.  30
    Ruth M. Kempson & Annabel Cormack (1981). Ambiguity and Quantification. Linguistics and Philosophy 4 (2):259 - 309.
    In the opening sections of this paper, we defined ambiguity in terms of distinct sentences (for a single sentence-string) with, in particular, distinct sets of truth conditions for the corresponding negative sentence-string. Lexical vagueness was defined as equivalent to disjunction, for under conditions of the negation of a sentence-string containing such an expression, all the relevant more specific interpretations of the string had also to be negated. Yet in the case of mixed quantification sentences, the strengthened, more specific, interpretations of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   23 citations  
  42.  16
    Michael Naas (2002). Taking on the Tradition: Jacques Derrida and the Legacies of Deconstruction. Stanford University Press.
    Taking on the Tradition focuses on how the work of Jacques Derrida has helped us rethink and rework the themes of tradition, legacy, and inheritance in the Western philosophical tradition. It concentrates not only on such themes in the work of Derrida but also on his own gestures with regard to these themes—that is, on the performativity of Derrida’s texts. The book thus uses Derrida’s understanding of speech act theory to reread his own work. The book consists in a series (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  43.  68
    Axel Honneth (2002). Grounding Recognition: A Rejoinder to Critical Questions. Inquiry 45 (4):499 – 519.
    It is always great good fortune for an author to have his writings meet with a receptive circle of readers who take them up in their own work and clarify them further. Indeed, it may even be the secret of all theoretical productivity that one reaches an opportune point in one's own creative process when others' queries, suggestions, and criticisms give one no peace, until one has been forced to come up with new answers and solutions. The four essays collected (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  44. David F. Austin (1990). What's the Meaning of 'This'?: A Puzzle About Demonstrative Belief. Cornell University Press.
    In recent literature in the philosophy of mind and language, one finds a variety of examples that raise serious problems for the traditional analysis of belief as a two-term relation between a believer and a proposition. My main purpose in this essay is to provide a critical test case for any theory of the propositional attitudes, and to demonstrate that this case really does present an unsolved puzzle. Chapter I defines the traditional, propositional analysis of belief, and then introduces a (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  45. Rudi Visker (2008). The Inhuman Condition: Looking for Difference After Levinas and Heidegger. Duquesne University Press.
    Introduction: Talking 'bout my generation -- Part I: Looking for difference -- Levinas, multiculturalism, and us -- In respectful contempt : Heidegger, appropriation, facticity -- Whistling in the dark : two approaches to anxiety -- Part II: After Levinas -- The price of being dispossessed : Levinas' God and Freud's trauma -- The mortality of the transcendent : Levinas and evil -- Is ethics fundamental? : questioning Levinas on irresponsibility -- Part III: After Heidegger -- Intransitive facticity : a question (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  46. Nicole A. Vincent (2006). Equality, Responsibility and Talent Slavery. Imprints 9 (2):118-39.
    Egalitarians must address two questions: i. What should there be an equality of, which concerns the currency of the ‘equalisandum’; and ii. How should this thing be allocated to achieve the so-called equal distribution? A plausible initial composite answer to these two questions is that resources should be allocated in accordance with choice, because this way the resulting distribution of the said equalisandum will ‘track responsibility’ — responsibility will be tracked in the sense that only we will be responsible for (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47.  52
    Brett Maynard Bevers (2011). Everett's “Many-Worlds” Proposal. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 42 (1):3-12.
    Hugh Everett III proposed that a quantum measurement can be treated as an interaction that correlates microscopic and macroscopic systems—particularly when the experimenter herself is included among those macroscopic systems. It has been difficult, however, to determine precisely what this proposal amounts to. Almost without exception, commentators have held that there are ambiguities in Everett’s theory of measurement that result from significant—even embarrassing—omissions. In the present paper, we resist the conclusion that Everett’s proposal is incomplete, and we develop a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  48.  48
    Pavel Gregoric (2007). Aristotle on the Common Sense. Oxford University Press.
    I. The framework. 1, Aristotle's project and methods. 2, The perceptual capacity of the soul. 3, The sensory apparatus. 4, The common sense and the related capacities -- II. The terminology. 1, Overlooked occurrences of the phrase 'common sense'. 2, De anima III.1 425a27. 3, De partibus animalium IV.10 686a31. 4, De memoria et reminiscentia 1 450a10. 5, De anima III.7 431b5. 6, Conclusions on the terminology -- III. Functions of the common sense. 1, Simultaneous perception and cross-modal binding. 2, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  49.  1
    Kevin J. Vanhoozer (2010). Remythologizing Theology: Divine Action, Passion, and Authorship. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Introduction: what is remythologizing?; Part I. 'God' in Scripture and Theology: 1. Biblical representation (Vorstellung): divine communicative action and passion; 2. Theological conceptualization (Begriff): varieties of theism and panentheism; 3. The new kenotic-perichoretic relational ontotheology: some 'classical' concerns; Part II. Communicative Theism and the Triune God: 4. God's being is in communicating; 5. God in three persons: the one who lights and lives in love; Part III. God and World: Authorial Action and Interaction: 6. Divine (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  50. Stephen Donaho (1998). Are Declarative Sentences Representational? Mind 107 (425):33-58.
    We call a semantic theory 'classical' if it includes the assertions that (I) a function V assigning semantic value maps object language proper names into some set D, (ii) V maps object language atomic sentences into some set F, and (iii) the extension of any object language unary predicate is a member of the power set of D. Two theorems can be proven which assert that any classical theory which includes certain other assumptions assigns the same member of F to (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000