Search results for 'Confucian ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Yunxia Zhu (2009). Confucian Ethics Exhibited in the Discourse of Chinese Business and Marketing Communication. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (Supplement 3):517 - 528.score: 246.0
    With the internationalisation of the Chinese market, Confucian ethics began to draw researchers' attention. However, little research has been conducted in the specific application of Confucian ethics in marketing communication. This article fills in the research gap by examining how Confucian ethics underpins the discourse of Chinese Expo invitations. Chinese sales managers' views are incorporated into the analysis as substantiation of findings. Confucian ethics embraces both qing (emotion) and li (reason) and relevant (...)
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  2. Heungsik Park, Michael T. Rehg & Donggi Lee (2005). The Influence of Confucian Ethics and Collectivism on Whistleblowing Intentions: A Study of South Korean Public Employees. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 58 (4):387 - 403.score: 246.0
    The current study presents the findings of an empirical inquiry into the effects of Confucian ethics and collectivism, on individual whistleblowing intentions. Confucian Ethics and Individualism–Collectivism were measured in a questionnaire completed by 343 public officials in South Korea. This study found that Confucian ethics had significant but mixed effects on whistleblowing intentions. The affection between father and son had a negative effect on internal and external whistleblowing intentions, while the distinction between the roles (...)
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  3. Yunping Wang (2008). Confucian Ethics and Emotions. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (3):352-365.score: 240.0
    The Confucian understanding of emotions and their ethical importance confirms and exemplifies the contemporary Western renewed understanding of the nature of emotions. By virtue of a systematic conceptual analysis of Confucian ethics, one can see that, according to Confucians, the ethical significance of emotions, lies in that an ethical life is also emotional and virtues are inclinational. And a further exploration shows that the reason for the ethical significance is both that emotions are heavenly-endowed and that there (...)
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  4. Wang Yunping (2008). Confucian Ethics and Emotions. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (3):352 - 365.score: 240.0
    The Confucian understanding of emotions and their ethical importance confirms and exemplifies the contemporary Western renewed understanding of the nature of emotions. By virtue of a systematic conceptual analysis of Confucian ethics, one can see that, according to Confucians, the ethical significance of emotions, lies in that an ethical life is also emotional and virtues are inclinational. And a further exploration shows that the reason for the ethical significance is both that emotions are heavenly-endowed and that there (...)
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  5. Peter R. Woods & David A. Lamond (2011). What Would Confucius Do? – Confucian Ethics and Self-Regulation in Management. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (4):669-683.score: 234.0
    We examined Confucian moral philosophy, primarily the Analects, to determine how Confucian ethics could help managers regulate their own behavior (self-regulation) to maintain an ethical standard of practice. We found that some Confucian virtues relevant to self-regulation are common to Western concepts of management ethics such as benevolence, righteousness, wisdom, and trustworthiness. Some are relatively unique, such as ritual propriety and filial piety. We identify seven Confucian principles and discuss how they apply to achieving (...)
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  6. Chad Hansen (1972). Freedom and Moral Responsibility in Confucian Ethics. Philosophy East and West 22 (2):169-186.score: 216.0
    Confucian moral philosophy doesn't seem to provide a theory of excuses. I explore an explanatory hypothesis to explain how excuse conditions might be built into the Confucian doctrine of rectifying names. In the process, I address the issue of the motivation for the theory. The hypothesis is that the theory provides not only excuse conditions, but also exception and conflict resolution roles for an essentially positive morality rooted in the traditional code of 禮 li/ritual, transmitted from the ancient (...)
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  7. Kwong-loi Shun & David B. Wong (eds.) (2004). Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community. Cambridge.score: 212.0
    The Chinese ethical tradition has often been thought to oppose Western views of the self--as autonomous and possessed of individual rights--with views that emphasize the centrality of relationship and community to the self. The essays in this collection discuss the validity of that contrast as it concerns Confucianism, the single most influential Chinese school of thought. (Alasdair MacIntyre, who has significantly articulated the need for dialogue across traditions, contributes a concluding essay of commentary.).
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  8. Qingsong Shen & Kwong-loi Shun (eds.) (2007). Confucian Ethics in Retrospect and Prospect. Council for Research in Values and Philosophy.score: 210.0
    desire. It is misleading to say that shu concerns the nature of desire in the ordinary sense, for it has more to do with the manner of satisfaction than ...
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  9. Yang Xiao (2011). Holding an Aristotelian Mirror to Confucian Ethics? Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (3):359-375.score: 210.0
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  10. Weiming Tu (1984). Confucian Ethics Today: The Singapore Challenge. Federal Publications.score: 210.0
  11. Fang Xudong (2012). Confucian Ethics and Impartiality: On the Confucian View About Brotherhood. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 7 (1):1-19.score: 210.0
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  12. Ok-Sun An (1997). Compassion and Benevolence: A Comparative Study of Early Buddhist and Classical Confucian Ethics. Peter Lang.score: 210.0
  13. Qiyong Guo (ed.) (2004). Ru Jia Lun Li Zheng Ming Ji: Yi "Qin Qin Hu Yin " Wei Zhong Xin = a Collection of Contention About Confucian Ethics. Hubei Jiao Yu Chu Ban She.score: 210.0
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  14. Youzheng Li (2004). Ren Xue Jie Shi Xue: Kong Meng Lun Li Xue Jie Gou Fen Xi = a Hermeneutics of the Ren-Learning: A Structural Analysis of Confucian Ethics. Zhongguo Ren Min da Xue Chu Ban She.score: 210.0
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  15. Yuli Liu (2004). The Unity of Rule and Virtue: A Critique of a Supposed Parallel Between Confucian Ethics and Virtue Ethics. Eastern Universities Press.score: 210.0
  16. Weiming Tu (ed.) (1991). The Triadic Chord: Confucian Ethics, Industrial East Asia, and Max Weber: Proceedings of the 1987 Singapore Conference on Confucian Ethics and the Modernisation of Industrial East Asia. Institute of East Asian Philosophies.score: 210.0
  17. Kai-wing Chow (1994). The Rise of Confucian Ritualism in Late Imperial China: Ethics, Classics, and Lineage Discourse. Stanford University Press.score: 204.0
    This pathbreaking work argues that the major intellectual trend in China from the seventeenth through to the early nineteenth century was Confucian ritualism, as expressed in ethics and classical learning. Through the performance of rites, the early Qing scholars believed they could cultivate Confucian virtues and achieve social order. The author shows how Confucian ritualism, with its emphasis on lineage, became a broad movement of social reform that stressed conformity and clearly prescribed rules of behavior, expressed (...)
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  18. Quey-Jen Yeh & Xiaojun Xu (2010). The Effect of Confucian Work Ethics on Learning About Science and Technology Knowledge and Morality. Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):111 - 128.score: 198.0
    While Chinese societies often appear centralized and traditional, presumably impeding technology and innovation, these values may simply reflect the negative-leaning poles of Confucianism. This study proposes a Confucian work ethic dimension that stresses justified tradition. In combination with Western innovative cultures, this Chinese style might facilitate learning about knowledge and morality in an interaction seemingly unique to the Chinese science and technology sector. Specifically, contrary to the Western style that tolerates conflict to achieve harmony, Confucian work ethics (...)
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  19. Jane Geaney (2000). Chinese Cosmology and Recent Studies in Confucian Ethics: A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (3):449 - 470.score: 198.0
    Scholars of early Chinese philosophy frequently point to the nontranscendent, organismic conception of the cosmos in early China as the source of China's unique perspective and distinctive values. One would expect recent works in Confucian ethics to capitalize on this idea. Reviewing recent works in Confucian ethics by P. J. Ivanhoe, David Nivison, R. P. Peerenboom, Henry Rosemont, and Tu Wei-Ming, the author analyzes these new studies in terms of the extent to which their representation of (...)
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  20. Deborah S. Mower (2013). Situationism and Confucian Virtue Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (1):113-137.score: 194.0
    Situationist research in social psychology focuses on the situational factors that influence behavior. Doris and Harman argue that this research has powerful implications for ethics, and virtue ethics in particular. First, they claim that situationist research presents an empirical challenge to the moral psychology presumed within virtue ethics. Second, they argue that situationist research supports a theoretical challenge to virtue ethics as a foundation for ethical behavior and moral development. I offer a response from moral psychology (...)
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  21. Edward J. Romar (2004). Managerial Harmony: The Confucian Ethics of Peter F. Drucker. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 51 (2):199-210.score: 186.0
    “Confucianism⋯ is a universal ethic in which the rules and imperatives of behavior hold for all individuals.” (Peter F. Drucker, Forbes, 1981). Peter Drucker is credited as the founder of modern American management. In his distinguished career he has written widely and authoritatively on the subject and to a large extent his work possesses a distinctive ethical tone. This paper will argue that Confucian ethics underlie much of Drucker's writing. Both Drucker and Confucius view power as the central (...)
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  22. Chenyang Li (2008). Does Confucian Ethics Integrate Care Ethics and Justice Ethics? The Case of Mencius. Asian Philosophy 18 (1):69 – 82.score: 180.0
    In recent years, scholars of Confucian ethics have debated on important issues such as whether Confucian ethics embraces, or should embrace, universal values and impartiality. Some have argued that Confucian ethics integrates both care and justice, and that Confucian ethics is both particularistic and universalistic. In this essay, I will defend a view of the relation between care and justice and the relation between care ethics and justice ethics on the (...)
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  23. Marc J. Dollinger (1988). Confucian Ethics and Japanese Management Practices. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (8):575 - 584.score: 180.0
    This paper proposes that an important method for understanding the ethics of Japanese management is the systematic study of its Confucian traditions and the writings of Confucius. Inconsistencies and dysfunction in Japanese ethical and managerial behavior can be attributed to contradictions in Confucius' writings and inconsistencies between the Confucian code and modern realities. Attention needs to be directed to modern Confucian philosophy since, historically Confucian thought has been an early warning system for impending change.
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  24. A. T. Nuyen (2007). Confucian Ethics as Role-Based Ethics. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (3):315-328.score: 180.0
    For many commentators, Confucian ethics is a kind of virtue ethics. However, there is enough textual evidence to suggest that it can be interpreted as an ethics based on rules, consequentialist as well as deontological. Against these views, I argue that Confucian ethics is based on the roles that make an agent the person he or she is. Further, I argue that in Confucianism the question of what it is that a person ought to (...)
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  25. Justin Tiwald (2011). Sympathy and Perspective-Taking in Confucian Ethics. Philosophy Compass 6 (10):663-674.score: 180.0
    This article spells out a forgotten debate in Confucian ethics that concerns the finer points of empathy, sympathy, and perspective-taking (sometimes called ‘role-taking’). The debate’s central question is whether sympathy is more virtuous when it is automatic and other-focused – that is, when we engage in perspective-taking without conscious effort and sympathize without significant reference to our selves or our own feelings.
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  26. M. Wang & X. Wang (2010). Organ Donation by Capital Prisoners in China: Reflections in Confucian Ethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (2):197-212.score: 180.0
    This article discusses the practice and development of organ donation by capital prisoners in China. It analyzes the issue of informed consent regarding organ donation from capital prisoners in light of Confucian ethics and expounds the point that under the influence of Confucianism, China is a country that attaches great importance to the role of the family in practicing informed consent in various areas, the area of organ donation from capital prisoners included. It argues that a proper form (...)
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  27. A. T. Nuyen (2007). Confucian Ethics and "the Age of Biological Control". Philosophy East and West 57 (1):83-96.score: 180.0
    : Ronald Dworkin claims that if we are able to control our own biology, "our most settled convictions will . . . be undermined [and] we will be in a kind of moral free-fall." This is so because he takes moral convictions to be determined by the choices we make against a fixed biological background. It would seem that if Confucian ethics is grounded in ren xing (human nature) and if ren xing refers to a fixed biological background, (...)
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  28. Karyn Lai (2012). Kam-Por Yu, Julia Tao, and Philip J. Ivanhoe (Eds.), Taking Confucian Ethics Seriously: Contemporary Theories and Applications. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):119-124.score: 180.0
    Kam-por Yu, Julia Tao, and Philip J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Taking Confucian Ethics Seriously: Contemporary Theories and Applications Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-6 DOI 10.1007/s11712-011-9253-y Authors Karyn Lai, School of History of Philosophy, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009.
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  29. Kam-por Yu, Julia Tao & Philip J. Ivanhoe (eds.) (2010). Taking Confucian Ethics Seriously: Contemporary Theories and Applications. SUNY.score: 180.0
    A consideration of Confucian ethics as a living ethical tradition with contemporary relevance.
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  30. Wai-Ying Wong (2012). Ren, Empathy and the Agent-Relative Approach in Confucian Ethics. Asian Philosophy 22 (2):133-141.score: 180.0
    The recent debate on whether Confucian Ethics should be viewed as a type of virtue ethics inevitably touches on the issue of the meaning of virtues such as ren ?, yi ?, and li ?. However, the argument would be over-simplified to claim that since Confucianism puts significant weight on virtues then it is virtue ethics. The conclusion would mainly depend on how we understand the key concepts such as ren, yi and the roles they play (...)
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  31. Roger T. Ames (2011). Confucian Role Ethics: A Vocabulary. The Chinese University Press.score: 180.0
  32. Young-Bae Song (2002). Crisis of Cultural Identity in East Asia: On the Meaning of Confucian Ethics in the Age of Globalisation. Asian Philosophy 12 (2):109 – 125.score: 174.0
    How can people from diverse and different cultural backgrounds balance and reconcile their autonomous cultural identity with the universal dictates of the global age? My approach to this question is from an East Asian perspective, in particular by addressing the issue of 'Confucian cultural identity' under four broad topics: (1) the truth and falsehood of the discourse on 'Asian Values' and 'Confucian-style Capitalism'; (2) the spread of modern science and the tragic consequences of 'Instrumental Reason'; (3) criticism of (...)
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  33. Pak-Hang Wong (2012). Dao, Harmony and Personhood: Towards a Confucian Ethics of Technology. Philosophy and Technology 25 (1):67-86.score: 174.0
    A closer look at the theories and questions in philosophy of technology and ethics of technology shows the absence and marginality of non-Western philosophical traditions in the discussions. Although, increasingly, some philosophers have sought to introduce non-Western philosophical traditions into the debates, there are few systematic attempts to construct and articulate general accounts of ethics and technology based on other philosophical traditions. This situation is understandable, for the questions of modern sciences and technologies appear to be originated from (...)
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  34. Rutaichanok Jingjit & Marianna Fotaki (2010). Confucian Ethics and the Limited Impact of the New Public Management Reform in Thailand. Journal of Business Ethics 97 (S1):61-73.score: 170.0
    The diffusion of New Public Management reforms across the globe is based on the assumption of the universal applicability of managerialism, driven by instrumental rationality, individualism, independence and competition. The aim of this article is to challenge this conception and to fill a significant gap in the existing research by analysing potential problems arising from the implementation of the NPM philosophy in non-Western public organisations. In-depth interviews and a large-scale survey were conducted across six public organisations in Thailand based on (...)
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  35. Kit-Chun Joanna Lam (2003). Confucian Business Ethics and the Economy. Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):153-162.score: 168.0
    Confucian ethics as applied to the study of business ethics often relate to the micro consideration of personal ethics and the character of a virtuous person. Actually, Confucius and his school have much to say about the morals of the public administration and the market institutions in a more macro level. While Weber emphasizes the role of culture on the development of the economy, and Marx the determining influence of the material base on ideology, we see (...)
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  36. A. T. Nuyen (2009). Moral Obligation and Moral Motivation in Confucian Role-Based Ethics. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (1):1-11.score: 162.0
    How is the Confucian moral agent motivated to do what he or she judges to be right or good? In western philosophy, the answer to a question such as this depends on whether one is an internalist or externalist concerning moral motivation. In this article, I will first interpret Confucian ethics as role-based ethics and then argue that we can attribute to Confucianism a position on moral motivation that is neither internalist nor externalist but somewhere in (...)
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  37. Alan K. L. Chan (2000). Confucian Ethics and the Critique of Ideology. Asian Philosophy 10 (3):245 – 261.score: 162.0
    The debate between Hans-Georg Gadamer and Jürgen Habermas provides a fresh perspective from which Confucian philosophy may be approached. In this paper, focusing on the Lunyu (Analects), I argue that the sayings of Confucius reflect an essentially 'conservative' orientation, finding in tradition a reservoir of insight and truth. There is a critical dimension to it in that ethical reflection and self-cultivation would enable the individual to challenge particular claims of tradition. However, can self-cultivation transcend tradition as a whole and (...)
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  38. Wen Haiming (2012). Confucian Co-Creative Ethics: Self and Family. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 7 (3):439-454.score: 162.0
    A general account of the Confucian self as either collectivist or relational requires careful examination. This article begins with the major textual resources of the Confucian tradition and then compares this idea of moral expansion with Deweyan ideas of the self and community. By parsing key Confucian terms that comprise the meaning of “being together” and “mutual association,” the author argues that Confucian selves and individuals are fundamentally contextually creative. By comparing the Confucian idea of (...)
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  39. Cho-yun Hsu (1991). Applying Confucian Ethics to International Relations. Ethics and International Affairs 5 (1):15–31.score: 156.0
  40. Philip J. Ivanhoe (2006). Kwong‐Loi Shun and David Wong, Eds., Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community:Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community. [REVIEW] Ethics 117 (1):156-160.score: 156.0
  41. Wai-Ying Wong (2011). The Moral and Non-Moral Virtues in Confucian Ethics. Asian Philosophy 21 (1):71-82.score: 156.0
    The question ?How should one live?? reflects the central concern in the ethics of Socrates. The answer to this question is not merely related to the concepts of obligation and duty, which constitute the major problems of modern moral philosophy, but it can also be considered from the prudential point of view. Therefore both the moral and non-moral realms contribute to a good life. Although there is little doubt concerning the existence of the non-moral realm in Confucianism, yet the (...)
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  42. Antonio S. Cua (1992). Confucian Ethics. In Lawrence C. Becker & Charlotte B. Becker (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Ethics. Garland Publishing Inc.score: 156.0
     
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  43. James Lenman, Tamar Schapiro, Daniel Statman, Harry Brighouse, Adam Swift & John Martin Fischer (2006). 10. Kwong‐Loi Shun and David Wong, Eds., Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community Kwong‐Loi Shun and David Wong, Eds., Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community (Pp. 156-160). [REVIEW] Ethics 117 (1).score: 156.0
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  44. Lai Chen (2010). Virtue Ethics and Confucian Ethics. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (3):275-287.score: 152.0
    This essay focuses on the unity of several virtues in pre-Qin Confucians. Confucius maintains the proper application and coherence of such virtues as benevolence, wisdom, trustworthiness, straightforwardness, courage, and firmness. Further, Confucius takes benevolence and nobility as characteristic of human being. Particular attention is paid to the distinction and relationship between virtuous characters and virtuous actions.
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  45. Edward Slingerland (2011). The Situationist Critique and Early Confucian Virtue Ethics. Ethics 121 (2):390-419.score: 150.0
    This article argues that strong versions of the situationist critique of virtue ethics are empirically and conceptually unfounded, as well as that, even if one accepts that the predictive power of character may be limited, this is not a fatal problem for early Confucian virtue ethics. Early Confucianism has explicit strategies for strengthening and expanding character traits over time, as well as for managing a variety of situational forces. The article concludes by suggesting that Confucian virtue (...)
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  46. Chenyang Li (1994). The Confucian Concept of Jen and the Feminist Ethics of Care: A Comparative Study. Hypatia 9 (1):70 - 89.score: 150.0
    This article compares Confucian ethics of Jen and feminist ethics of care. It attempts to show that they share philosophically significant common grounds. Its findings affirm the view that care-orientation in ethics is not a characteristic peculiar to one sex. It also shows that care-orientation is not peculiar to subordinated social groups. Arguing that the oppression of women is not an essential element of Confucian ethics, the author indicates the Confucianism and feminism are compatible.
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  47. Mingxu Wang, Wen Zhang & Xueliang Wang (2008). The Principle of Family Determination in Organ Donation: The Application of Confucian Ethics. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 20 (2):183-196.score: 150.0
  48. Karyn L. Lai (2009). Chong, Kim-Chong, Early Confucian Ethics: Concepts and Arguments. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (4):467-470.score: 150.0
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  49. Karyn L. Lai (2009). Judgment in Confucian Ethics. Sophia 48 (1):77-84.score: 150.0
  50. Yanming An (2009). Li, Youzheng 李幼蒸, a Hermeneutics of the Ren-Learning: A Structural Analysis of Confucian Ethics 仁學解釋學 : 孔孟倫理學結構分析. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (3):341-344.score: 150.0
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