Search results for 'Confucius and Confucianism. [from old catalog' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. C. Y. [from old catalog] Hsu (1926). The Philosophy of Confucius. London, Student Christian Movement.score: 963.0
     
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  2. Herrlee Glessner Creel (1951). Confucius. London, Routledge & K. Paul.score: 819.0
     
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  3. Shao-lun Wang (1955). Jên Lei Hsing Fu Chih Lu.score: 774.0
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  4. Kung-chʻao Yeh (1943). The Confucian Conception of Jên. London, the China Society.score: 774.0
  5. Bonnie Louise Kuchler (ed.) (2004). One Heart: Universal Wisdom From the World's Scriptures. Marlowe.score: 228.0
    The purpose of One Heart is to illuminate the common sacred ground at the heart of seven faiths: Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Taoism. Its method is to identify 65 essential principles, among them: Feel what other people feel; Don't harm others; Lead with virtue and concern for others; Be honest; Practice what you preach; Be content; Don't let anger take over; Choose your companions wisely; Accept the existence of spiritual beings; Seek and you will find. Illustrating (...)
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  6. Confucius[From Old Catalog], Kramers, Robert Paul, [From Old Catalog] & Su Wang (eds.) (1950). Kʻung Tsŭ Chia Yü. Leiden, E. J. Brill.score: 196.8
     
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  7. Confucius[from old catalog] (1942). The Conduct of Life. New York, the New Home Library.score: 196.8
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  8. David Ackerman, Jing Hu & Liyuan Wei (2009). Confucius, Cars, and Big Government: Impact of Government Involvement in Business on Consumer Perceptions Under Confucianism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):473 - 482.score: 162.0
    Building on prior research in Confucianism and business, the current study examines the effects of Confucianism on consumer trust of government involvement with products and company brands. Based on three major ideas of Confucianism – meritocracy, loyalty to superior, and separation of responsibilities – it is expected that consumers under the influence of Confucianism would perceive products from government-involved enterprises to have more desirable attributes and show preference for their company brands. Findings from an empirical study in the Chinese automobile (...)
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  9. Fêng-chên[from old catalog] Chia (1937). Chung-Kuo Li Hsüeh Shih.score: 139.2
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  10. Hagop Sarkissian (2010). Confucius and the Effortless Life of Virtue. History of Philosophy Quarterly 27 (1):1-16.score: 135.0
    Natural talent and diligent practice regularly lead to effortless virtuosity in many fields, such as music and athletics. Can the same be true of morality? Confucius’s wonderfully terse autobiography in the Analects suggests that, given the right starting materials and an appropriate curriculum of study, a program of moral self-cultivation can indeed lead to effortless moral virtuosity. But can we make sense of this claim from a contemporary perspective? This paper evaluates the plausibility of the moral ideal in the (...)
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  11. Shuo Dongfang & Hongcheng Lin (2006). Separation of Politics and Morality: A Commentary on Analects of Confucius. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (3):401-417.score: 135.0
    Confucians emphasizes and values morality, hence observers tended to regard moralities as politics so that the independent politics in the Confucian tradition has become implicit. Through a perusal of the Analects of Confucius, we can find that ethics and politics were separated from and independent of each other to Confucius, the primitive Confucian: he did not substitute ethics for politics.
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  12. Ronnie Littlejohn (2010). Confucianism: An Introduction. I.B. Tauris.score: 135.0
    "China has 'arrived,' and Ronnie Littlejohn helps us know this antique culture better. In his entirely accessible introduction, Littlejohn has done the academy the timely service of resourcing the best contemporary research in sinology to tell the compelling story of a living Confucianism as it has meandered through the dynasties to flow down to our present time." -- Roger T. Ames, Professor of Philosophy, University of Hawai’i "Although basically intended as an introductory text for undergraduates, this book is equally a (...)
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  13. Jiyuan Yu (2008). The “Manifesto” of New-Confucianism and the Revival of Virtue Ethics. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (3):317-334.score: 126.0
    In 1958, a group of New-Confucians issued “A Manifesto for a Re-Appraisal of Sinology and Reconstruction of Chinese Culture.” Equally in 1958, the British philosopher Elizabeth Anscombe published her classical paper “Modern Moral Philosophy.” These two papers have the same target — modern Western morality — and the solutions they proposed respectively. Yet Anscombe’s paper did not mention Confucianism, and the “Manifesto” ignored Aristotelian tradition of virtue. Furthermore, from 1960s to 1990s, the revival movement of Confucianism and the revival movement (...)
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  14. David Elstein (2010). Why Early Confucianism Cannot Generate Democracy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):427-443.score: 126.0
    A central issue in Chinese philosophy today is the relationship between Confucianism and democracy. While some political figures have argued that Confucian values justify non-democratic forms of government, many scholars have argued that Confucianism can provide justification for democracy, though this Confucian democracy will differ substantially from liberal democracy. These scholars believe it is important for Chinese culture to develop its own conception of democracy using Confucian values, drawn mainly from Kongzi (Confucius) and Mengzi (Mencius), as the basis. This (...)
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  15. May Sim (2007). Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius. Cambridge University Press.score: 126.0
    Aristotle and Confucius are pivotal figures in world history; nevertheless, Western and Eastern cultures have in modern times largely abandoned the insights of these masters. Remastering Morals is the first book-length scholarly comparison of the ethics of Aristotle and Confucius. May Sim's comparisons offer fresh interpretations of the central teachings of both men. More than a catalog of similarities and differences, her study brings two great traditions into dialog so that each is able to learn from the (...)
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  16. Yu Jiyuan & Lei Yongqiang (2008). The "Manifesto" of New-Confucianism and the Revival of Virtue Ethics. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (3):317 - 334.score: 126.0
    In 1958, a group of New-Confucians issued "A Manifesto for a Re-Appraisal of Sinology and Reconstruction of Chinese Culture." Equally in 1958, the British philosopher Elizabeth Anscombe published her classical paper "Modern Moral Philosophy." These two papers have the same target — modern Western morality — and the solutions they proposed respectively. Yet Anscombe's paper did not mention Confucianism, and the "Manifesto" ignored Aristotelian tradition of virtue. Furthermore, from 1960s to 1990s, the revival movement of Confucianism and the revival movement (...)
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  17. Jeffrey L. Richey (ed.) (2008). Teaching Confucianism. Oxford University Press.score: 126.0
    Even the most casual observer of Chinese society is aware of the tremendous significance of Confucianism as a linchpin of both ancient and modern Chinese identity. Furthermore, the Confucian tradition has exercised enormous influence over the values and institutions of the other cultures of East Asia, an influence that continues to be important in the global Asian diaspora. If forecasters are correct in labeling the 21st century 'the Chinese century,' teachers and scholars of religious studies and theology will be called (...)
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  18. Shih-Yu Kuo (2011). Climate Change and the Ecological Intelligence of Confucius. Journal of Global Ethics 7 (2):185 - 194.score: 108.0
    Confucius is conventionally regarded as the founder of secular humanism and as a philosopher concerned about humans and culture. I would add to this that Confucius should also be read as an environmental philosopher. One reason is the pedagogical dimension in Confucianism, which points to Confucius as an environmental educator ? not the least of which since much of environmental education relies on common sense and an enlightened collective self-interest. Another reason is an aspect I call ?ecological (...)
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  19. Sor-hoon Tan (2010). Authoritative Master Kong (Confucius) in an Authoritarian Age. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):137-149.score: 108.0
    Employing the distinction between the authoritarian (based on coercion) and the authoritative (based on excellence), this study of the understanding of authority in the Analects argues against interpretations of Confucianism which cast Confucius himself as advocating authoritarianism. Passages with key notions such as shang 上 and xia 下; fu 服 and cong 從; quan 權 and wei 威, are analyzed to illuminate ideas of hierarchy, obedience, and the nature of authority itself in the text. The evidence pieced together reveals (...)
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  20. Shiling Xiang (2010). Inquiry Into the Transcendence of Tang Dynasty Confucians to Han Dynasty Confucians and the Transformation of Traditional Confucianism in Terms of Lunyu Bijie. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):471-485.score: 108.0
    Neo-Confucianism of the Han and Tang dynasties is an indispensable part of the history of Chinese philosophy. From Han dynasty Confucians to Tang dynasty Confucians, the study of Confucian classics evolved progressively from textual research to conceptual explanation. A significant sign of this transformation is the book Lunyu Bijie 论语笔解 (A Written Explanation of the Analects), co-authored by Han Yu and Li Ao. Making use of the tremendous room for interpretation within the Analects, the book studied and reorganized the relationship (...)
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  21. Edward Slingerland (2001). Virtue Ethics, the "Analects," and the Problem of Commensurability. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (1):97 - 125.score: 108.0
    In support of the thesis that virtue ethics allows for a more comprehensive and consistent interpretation of the "Analects" than other possible models, the author uses a structural outline of a virtue ethic (derived from Alasdair MacIntyre's account of the Aristotelian tradition) to organize a discussion of the text. The resulting interpretation focuses attention on the religious aspects of Confucianism and accounts for aspects of the text that are otherwise difficult to explain. In addition, the author argues that the structural (...)
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  22. Peimin Ni, Confucius Making the Way Great, Rediscovering China Series.score: 108.0
    Through a systematic "gongfu" reading of Confucius, this book shows how Confucius' ideas are different from dogmatized or overly intellectualistic understandings of Confucianism and how the Master s insights can be a rich resource for re-enchanting the world and the contemporary life. Review: The book is a thoughtful and inspiring presentation of Confucianism as arguably the longest and most influential ethical and spiritual traditions in human history. It is highly readable with many insightful observations.
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  23. Geir Sigurðsson (2012). Li 禮, Ritual and Pedagogy: A Cross-Cultural Exploration. [REVIEW] Sophia 51 (2):227-242.score: 108.0
    The aim of this article is to show, first, that ritual in general and the Confucian li in particular can serve an important pedagogical function, and, secondly, that the sophisticated treatment of li by Confucius and his immediate followers demonstrates that they were consciously aware of this particular potential of li. The discussion takes off by considering formal, ritualized performances from an educational point of view by making use of some seminal, largely Western, research on ritual, though always with (...)
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  24. Huaiyu Wang (2010). Jiang, Wenye 江文也, a Discourse on Confucius's Music 孔子的樂論. Translated From 上代支那正樂考—孔子の音樂論 by Y Ang Rubin 楊儒賓. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (1):115-119.score: 96.0
    Jiang, Wenye 江文也, A Discourse on Confucius’s Music 孔子的樂論. Translated from 上代支那正樂考—孔子の音樂論 by Y ang Rubin 楊儒賓 Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11712-009-9148-3 Authors Huaiyu Wang, Georgia College & State University Department of History, Geography, and Philosophy Campus Box 47 Milledgeville GA 31061 USA Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009 Journal Volume Volume 9 Journal Issue Volume 9, Number 1.
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  25. Confucius, Analects of Confucius, the (From the Chinese Classics).score: 85.2
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  26. Günter Wohlfart (2010). Kantianism Versus Confucianism: From Kant's Universalized Egocentrism to Kongzi's Moral Reciprocity and Mengzi's Compassion. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 2 (1):105-116.score: 85.2
    This is a “metacritical” engagement from a Confucian perspective with the legacy of Kantian ethics. The first and longest part of this essay deals with the European West and Kant, especially the categorical imperative. The second part hearkens back to East Asian antiquity, especially Ancient China, as it briefly explores Kongzi’s Golden Rule and Mengzi’s compassion.
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  27. Justin Tiwald (2009). Review of Philip J. Ivanhoe, Readings From the Lu-Wang School of Neo-Confucianism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 9 (36).score: 84.0
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  28. Christian Helmut Wenzel (2009). Kant's Aesthetics: Overview and Recent Literature. Philosophy Compass 4 (3):380-406.score: 81.0
    In 1764, Kant published his Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and the Sublime and in 1790 his influential third Critique , the Critique of the Power of Judgment . The latter contains two parts, the 'Critique of the Aesthetic Power of Judgment' and the 'Critique of the Teleological Power of Judgment'. They reveal a new principle, namely the a priori principle of purposiveness ( Zweckmäßigkeit ) of our power of judgment, and thereby offer new a priori grounds for (...)
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  29. Inazō Nitobe (1906/2004). Bushido: Samurai Ethics and the Soul of Japan. Dover Publications.score: 81.0
    At the turn of the 20th century, when Japan was evolving from an isolated feudal society into a modern nation, a Japanese educator wrote this book to introduce the rest of the world to his society's traditional values. Author Inazo Nitobe defines bushido, the way of the warrior, as the source of the virtues most admired by his people. In this eloquent work, he takes an eclectic and far-reaching approach, drawing examples from indigenous traditions--Buddhism, Shintoism, Confucianism, and the centuries-old philosophies (...)
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  30. JeeLoo Liu (2007). Confucian Moral Realism. Asian Philosophy 17 (2):167 – 184.score: 81.0
    In this paper I construct Confucian moral realism as a metaethical theory that is compatible with, or even derivable from, traditional Confucianism. The paper is at once interpretative and constructive. In my analysis, Confucians can establish the realist's claims on moral properties because they embrace the view of a moralistic universe. Moral properties in Confucian ethics not only are presented as objective, naturalistic properties, but also are seen as 'causally efficacious'. There are several theses commonly endorsed by contemporary moral realists. (...)
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  31. Sor-Hoon Tan (2007). Confucian Democracy as Pragmatic Experiment: Uniting Love of Learning and Love of Antiquity. Asian Philosophy 17 (2):141 – 166.score: 81.0
    This paper argues for the pragmatic construction of Confucian democracy by showing that Chinese philosophers who wish to see Confucianism flourish again as a positive dimension of Chinese civilization need to approach it pragmatically and democratically, otherwise their love of the past is at the expense of something else Confucius held in equal esteem, love of learning. Chinese philosophers who desire democracy for China would do well to learn from the earlier failures of the iconoclastic Westernizers, and realize that (...)
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  32. Kim Sungmoon (2009). Self-Transformation and Civil Society: Lockean Vs. Confucian. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (4):383-401.score: 81.0
    Although contemporary Confucianists tend to view Western liberalism as pitting the individual against society, recent liberal scholarship has vigorously claimed that liberal polity is indeed grounded in the self-transformation that produces “liberal virtues.” To meet this challenge, this essay presents a sophisticated Confucian critique of liberalism by arguing that there is an appreciable contrast between liberal and Confucian self-transformation and between liberal and Confucian virtues. By contrasting Locke and Confucius, key representatives of each tradition, this essay shows that both (...)
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  33. Oliver Leaman (ed.) (2001). Encyclopedia of Asian Philosophy. Routledge.score: 81.0
    From Abhidharma to Zurvan, this important new resource identifies and defines the principal concepts and individuals in Asian philosophy throughout the world. The comprehensive geographic coverage encompasses China, Japan, India, the Middle East, the United States and Australasia, with an emphasis on contemporary developments and movements. Featuring 650 signed A-Z entries, the Encyclopedia emphasises the present-day vitality of Asian philosophy, and provides extensive coverage of trends such as the reciprocal exchange of theories between East and West, and new schools of (...)
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  34. Quey-Jen Yeh & Xiaojun Xu (2010). The Effect of Confucian Work Ethics on Learning About Science and Technology Knowledge and Morality. Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):111 - 128.score: 81.0
    While Chinese societies often appear centralized and traditional, presumably impeding technology and innovation, these values may simply reflect the negative-leaning poles of Confucianism. This study proposes a Confucian work ethic dimension that stresses justified tradition. In combination with Western innovative cultures, this Chinese style might facilitate learning about knowledge and morality in an interaction seemingly unique to the Chinese science and technology sector. Specifically, contrary to the Western style that tolerates conflict to achieve harmony, Confucian work ethics -an Eastern way (...)
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  35. Ted Slingerland (1996). The Conception of Ming in Early Confucian Thought. Philosophy East and West 46 (4):567-581.score: 81.0
    Various interpretations of the role that ming ("fate") plays in early Confucian thought are examined. An interpretation is advanced which argues that early Confucians saw reality as being bifurcated into two distinct realms--"inner" and "outer"--and that ming refers to unpredictable forces in the outside realm, which are beyond the bounds of proper human endeavor. The vagaries of ming are not the concern of the gentleman, whose efforts and worries are to be focused on the cultivation of the self: the inner (...)
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  36. Keqian Xu (2012). A Synthetic Comprehension of the Way of Zhong in Early Confucian Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 7 (3):422-438.score: 81.0
    Zhong 中 is a very important philosophical concept in early Confucianism. Both the received ancient Confucian classics and the newly discovered ancient bamboo manuscripts tell us that adhering to the principle of zhong was an important charge that had been transmitted and inherited by early ancient Chinese political leaders from generation to generation. Confucius and his followers adopted the concept of zhong and further developed it into a sophisticated doctrine, which is usually called zhongdao 中道 (the Way of zhong) (...)
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  37. Jinglin Li (2010). Mencius' Refutation of Yang Zhu and Mozi and the Theoretical Implication of Confucian Benevolence and Love. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (2):155-178.score: 81.0
    Confucianism defined benevolence with “feelings” and “love.” “Feelings” in Confucianism can be mainly divided into three categories: feelings in general (seven kinds of feelings), love for one’s relatives, and compassion (Four Commencements). The seven kinds of feeling in which people respond to things can be summarized as “likes and dislikes.” The mind responds to things through feelings; based on the mind of benevolence and righteousness or feelings of compassion, the expression of feelings can conform to the principle of (...)
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  38. Peter Singer (ed.) (1994). Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 81.0
    What is ethics? Where does it come from? Can we really hope to find any rational way of deciding how we ought to live? If we can, what would it be like, and how are we going to know when we have found it? To capture the essentials of what we know about the origins and nature of ethics, Peter Singer has drawn on anthropology, evolution, game theory, and works of fiction, in addition to the classic moral philosophy of such (...)
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  39. Yi Guo (2008). Human Nature, Mind and Virtue. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 10:143-147.score: 81.0
    The key issue of traditional theories of human nature in China is De or virtue, Yu or desire and their correlation. It leads to two developing currents: one is the old tradition since Xia, Shang and Zhou, the Three Dynasties which take desire as nature, another is the new tradition later Confucius initiated which take virtue as nature. So the understanding of human nature in early China experienced a process from desire to virtue, or from the instinct of human (...)
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  40. Chozan Niwa (2006). The Demon's Sermon on the Martial Arts and Other Tales. Kodansha International.score: 81.0
    The Demon said to the swordsman, "Fundamentally, man's mind is not without good. It is simply that from the moment he has life, he is always being brought up with perversity. Thus, having no idea that he has gotten used to being soaked in it, he harms his self-nature and falls into evil. Human desire is the root of this perversity." Woven deeply into the martial traditions and folklore of Japan, the fearsome Tengu dwell in the country's mountain forest. Mythical (...)
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  41. Mary Walsh (2008). The Oxford Handbook of Political Theory. Contemporary Political Theory 7 (2):232-234.score: 81.0
    Long recognized as one of the main branches of political science, political theory has in recent years burgeoned in many different directions. Close textual analysis of historical texts sits alongside more analytical work on the nature and normative grounds of political values. Continental and post-modern influences jostle with ones from economics, history, sociology, and the law. Feminist concerns with embodiment make us look at old problems in new ways, and challenges of new technologies open whole new vistas for political theory. (...)
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  42. Guo Yi (2008). Human Nature, Mind and Virtue. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 10:481-485.score: 81.0
    The key issue of traditional theories of human nature in China is De or virtue, Yu or desire and their correlation. It leads to two developing currents: one is the old tradition since Xia, Shang and Zhou, the Three Dynasties which take desire as nature, another is the new tradition later Confucius initiated which take virtue as nature. So the understanding of human nature in early China experienced a process from desire to virtue, or from the instinct of human (...)
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  43. Karen Armstrong (2006). The Great Transformation: The Beginning of Our Religious Traditions. Knopf.score: 81.0
    In the ninth century BCE, the peoples of four distinct regions of the civilized world created the religious and philosophical traditions that have continued to nourish humanity to the present day: Confucianism and Daoism in China, Hinduism and Buddhism in India, monotheism in Israel, and philosophical rationalism in Greece. Later generations further developed these initial insights, but we have never grown beyond them. Rabbinic Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, for example, were all secondary flowerings of the original Israelite vision. Now, in (...)
     
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  44. A. S. Cua (ed.) (2003). Encyclopedia of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.score: 81.0
    Featuring contributions from the world's most highly esteemed Asian philosophy scholars, this important encyclopedia covers the complex and increasingly influential field of Chinese thought, from earliest recorded times to the present day. Including coverage on the subject previously unavailable to English speakers, the Encyclopedia sheds light on the extensive range of concepts, movements, philosophical works, and thinkers that populate the field. It includes a thorough survey of the history of Chinese philosophy; entries on all major thinkers from Confucius to (...)
     
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  45. Carine Defoort (1995). Voor wie moet je zorg dragen ? Morele discusses tussen vroege confucianisten en mohisten. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 57 (1):36 - 50.score: 81.0
    Beginning with a dialogue written in the Mencius (late 4th c. B.C.), this article traces an old discussion in Chinese philosophy concerning the question of whom one shouldtake care of. Confucius (551-479 B.C.) values the capacity for empathy or 'likening to oneself'. He thereby promotes, without explicitly arguing for it, a revaluation and extension of the traditional attitude of gradual concern, starting from close relatives and radiating outward. The first opposition to this attitude comes from the Mohists (5-4th c. (...)
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  46. Roger T. Ames & David L. Hall (2003). Dao De Jing: Making This Life Significant: A Philosophical Translation. Ballantine Books.score: 81.0
    Composed more than 2,000 years ago during a turbulent period of Chinese history, the Dao de jing set forth an alternative vision of reality in a world torn apart by violence and betrayal. Daoism, as this subtle but enduring philosophy came to be known, offers a comprehensive view of experience grounded in a full understanding of the wonders hidden in the ordinary. Now in this luminous new translation, based on the recently discovered ancient bamboo scrolls, China scholars Roger T. Ames (...)
     
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  47. Laozi (2003). Dao de Jing: Making This Life Significant: A Philosophical Translation. Ballantine Books.score: 81.0
    Composed more than 2,000 years ago during a turbulent period of Chinese history, the Dao de jing set forth an alternative vision of reality in a world torn apart by violence and betrayal. Daoism, as this subtle but enduring philosophy came to be known, offers a comprehensive view of experience grounded in a full understanding of the wonders hidden in the ordinary. Now in this luminous new translation, based on the recently discovered ancient bamboo scrolls, China scholars Roger T. Ames (...)
     
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  48. Deborah Sommer (ed.) (1995). Chinese Religion: An Anthology of Sources. Oxford University Press.score: 81.0
    For centuries, westerners have referred to China's numerous traditions of spiritual expression as "religious"--a word born of western thought that cannot completely characterize the passionate writing that fills the pages of this pathbreaking anthology. The first of its kind in well over thirty years, this text offers the student of Chinese ritual and cosmology the broadest range of primary sources from antiquity to the modern era. Readings are arranged chronologically and cover such concepts as Taoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, and even communism. (...)
     
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  49. Leslie Forster Stevenson (2009). Ten Theories of Human Nature. Oxford University Press.score: 81.0
    Over three previous editions, Ten Theories of Human Nature has been a remarkably popular introduction to some of the most influential developments in Western and Eastern thought. This thoroughly revised fourth edition features substantial new chapters on Aristotle and on evolutionary theories of human nature; the latter centers on Edward O. Wilson but also outlines the ideas of Emile Durkheim, B. F. Skinner, Nikolaas Tinbergen, Konrad Lorenz, Noam Chomsky, and recent evolutionary psychology. This edition also includes a rewritten introduction that (...)
     
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  50. Jinli He (2014). Zhang, Xianglong 張祥龍, Rejecting the Qin, Revitalizing the Han, and Responding to Buddhism: Confucianism From D Ong Zhongshu to L U Xiangshan 拒秦興漢和應對佛學的儒家哲學:從董仲舒到陸象山. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):299-303.score: 79.2
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