Search results for 'Confucius and Confucianism. [from old catalog' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. C. Y. [from old catalog] Hsu (1926). The Philosophy of Confucius. London, Student Christian Movement.score: 993.0
     
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  2. Herrlee Glessner Creel (1951). Confucius. London, Routledge & K. Paul.score: 849.0
     
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  3. Shao-lun Wang (1955). Jên Lei Hsing Fu Chih Lu.score: 774.0
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  4. Kung-chʻao Yeh (1943). The Confucian Conception of Jên. London, the China Society.score: 774.0
  5. Bonnie Louise Kuchler (ed.) (2004). One Heart: Universal Wisdom From the World's Scriptures. Marlowe.score: 252.0
    The purpose of One Heart is to illuminate the common sacred ground at the heart of seven faiths: Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Taoism. Its method is to identify 65 essential principles, among them: Feel what other people feel; Don't harm others; Lead with virtue and concern for others; Be honest; Practice what you preach; Be content; Don't let anger take over; Choose your companions wisely; Accept the existence of spiritual beings; Seek and you will find. Illustrating (...)
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  6. David Ackerman, Jing Hu & Liyuan Wei (2009). Confucius, Cars, and Big Government: Impact of Government Involvement in Business on Consumer Perceptions Under Confucianism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):473 - 482.score: 234.0
    Building on prior research in Confucianism and business, the current study examines the effects of Confucianism on consumer trust of government involvement with products and company brands. Based on three major ideas of Confucianism – meritocracy, loyalty to superior, and separation of responsibilities – it is expected that consumers under the influence of Confucianism would perceive products from government-involved enterprises to have more desirable attributes and show preference for their company brands. Findings from an empirical study in the Chinese automobile (...)
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  7. Confucius[From Old Catalog], Kramers, Robert Paul, [From Old Catalog] & Su Wang (eds.) (1950). Kʻung Tsŭ Chia Yü. Leiden, E. J. Brill.score: 196.8
     
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  8. Confucius[from old catalog] (1942). The Conduct of Life. New York, the New Home Library.score: 196.8
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  9. Hagop Sarkissian (2010). Confucius and the Effortless Life of Virtue. History of Philosophy Quarterly 27 (1):1-16.score: 153.0
    Natural talent and diligent practice regularly lead to effortless virtuosity in many fields, such as music and athletics. Can the same be true of morality? Confucius’s wonderfully terse autobiography in the Analects suggests that, given the right starting materials and an appropriate curriculum of study, a program of moral self-cultivation can indeed lead to effortless moral virtuosity. But can we make sense of this claim from a contemporary perspective? This paper evaluates the plausibility of the moral ideal in the (...)
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  10. Shuo Dongfang & Hongcheng Lin (2006). Separation of Politics and Morality: A Commentary on Analects of Confucius. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (3):401-417.score: 153.0
    Confucians emphasizes and values morality, hence observers tended to regard moralities as politics so that the independent politics in the Confucian tradition has become implicit. Through a perusal of the Analects of Confucius, we can find that ethics and politics were separated from and independent of each other to Confucius, the primitive Confucian: he did not substitute ethics for politics.
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  11. Ronnie Littlejohn (2010). Confucianism: An Introduction. I.B. Tauris.score: 153.0
    "China has 'arrived,' and Ronnie Littlejohn helps us know this antique culture better. In his entirely accessible introduction, Littlejohn has done the academy the timely service of resourcing the best contemporary research in sinology to tell the compelling story of a living Confucianism as it has meandered through the dynasties to flow down to our present time." -- Roger T. Ames, Professor of Philosophy, University of Hawai’i "Although basically intended as an introductory text for undergraduates, this book is equally a (...)
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  12. David Elstein (2010). Why Early Confucianism Cannot Generate Democracy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):427-443.score: 144.0
    A central issue in Chinese philosophy today is the relationship between Confucianism and democracy. While some political figures have argued that Confucian values justify non-democratic forms of government, many scholars have argued that Confucianism can provide justification for democracy, though this Confucian democracy will differ substantially from liberal democracy. These scholars believe it is important for Chinese culture to develop its own conception of democracy using Confucian values, drawn mainly from Kongzi (Confucius) and Mengzi (Mencius), as the basis. This (...)
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  13. Jiyuan Yu (2008). The “Manifesto” of New-Confucianism and the Revival of Virtue Ethics. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (3):317-334.score: 144.0
    In 1958, a group of New-Confucians issued “A Manifesto for a Re-Appraisal of Sinology and Reconstruction of Chinese Culture.” Equally in 1958, the British philosopher Elizabeth Anscombe published her classical paper “Modern Moral Philosophy.” These two papers have the same target — modern Western morality — and the solutions they proposed respectively. Yet Anscombe’s paper did not mention Confucianism, and the “Manifesto” ignored Aristotelian tradition of virtue. Furthermore, from 1960s to 1990s, the revival movement of Confucianism and the revival movement (...)
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  14. May Sim (2007). Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius. Cambridge University Press.score: 144.0
    Aristotle and Confucius are pivotal figures in world history; nevertheless, Western and Eastern cultures have in modern times largely abandoned the insights of these masters. Remastering Morals is the first book-length scholarly comparison of the ethics of Aristotle and Confucius. May Sim's comparisons offer fresh interpretations of the central teachings of both men. More than a catalog of similarities and differences, her study brings two great traditions into dialog so that each is able to learn from the (...)
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  15. Huaiyu Wang (2010). Jiang, Wenye 江文也, a Discourse on Confucius's Music 孔子的樂論. Translated From 上代支那正樂考—孔子の音樂論 by Y Ang Rubin 楊儒賓. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (1):115-119.score: 144.0
    Jiang, Wenye 江文也, A Discourse on Confucius’s Music 孔子的樂論. Translated from 上代支那正樂考—孔子の音樂論 by Y ang Rubin 楊儒賓 Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11712-009-9148-3 Authors Huaiyu Wang, Georgia College & State University Department of History, Geography, and Philosophy Campus Box 47 Milledgeville GA 31061 USA Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009 Journal Volume Volume 9 Journal Issue Volume 9, Number 1.
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  16. Yu Jiyuan & Lei Yongqiang (2008). The "Manifesto" of New-Confucianism and the Revival of Virtue Ethics. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (3):317 - 334.score: 144.0
    In 1958, a group of New-Confucians issued "A Manifesto for a Re-Appraisal of Sinology and Reconstruction of Chinese Culture." Equally in 1958, the British philosopher Elizabeth Anscombe published her classical paper "Modern Moral Philosophy." These two papers have the same target — modern Western morality — and the solutions they proposed respectively. Yet Anscombe's paper did not mention Confucianism, and the "Manifesto" ignored Aristotelian tradition of virtue. Furthermore, from 1960s to 1990s, the revival movement of Confucianism and the revival movement (...)
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  17. Jeffrey L. Richey (ed.) (2008). Teaching Confucianism. Oxford University Press.score: 144.0
    Even the most casual observer of Chinese society is aware of the tremendous significance of Confucianism as a linchpin of both ancient and modern Chinese identity. Furthermore, the Confucian tradition has exercised enormous influence over the values and institutions of the other cultures of East Asia, an influence that continues to be important in the global Asian diaspora. If forecasters are correct in labeling the 21st century 'the Chinese century,' teachers and scholars of religious studies and theology will be called (...)
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  18. Fêng-chên[from old catalog] Chia (1937). Chung-Kuo Li Hsüeh Shih.score: 139.2
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  19. Confucius, Analects of Confucius, the (From the Chinese Classics).score: 138.0
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  20. Günter Wohlfart (2010). Kantianism Versus Confucianism: From Kant's Universalized Egocentrism to Kongzi's Moral Reciprocity and Mengzi's Compassion. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 2 (1):105-116.score: 138.0
    This is a “metacritical” engagement from a Confucian perspective with the legacy of Kantian ethics. The first and longest part of this essay deals with the European West and Kant, especially the categorical imperative. The second part hearkens back to East Asian antiquity, especially Ancient China, as it briefly explores Kongzi’s Golden Rule and Mengzi’s compassion.
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  21. Justin Tiwald (2009). Review of Philip J. Ivanhoe, Readings From the Lu-Wang School of Neo-Confucianism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 9 (36).score: 132.0
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  22. Jinli He (2014). Zhang, Xianglong 張祥龍, Rejecting the Qin, Revitalizing the Han, and Responding to Buddhism: Confucianism From D Ong Zhongshu to L U Xiangshan 拒秦興漢和應對佛學的儒家哲學:從董仲舒到陸象山. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):299-303.score: 132.0
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  23. J. R. Levenson (1963). The Inception and Displacement of Confucianism: From History as the Base of Culture to Historicism and Shifting Sands. Diogenes 11 (42):65-80.score: 132.0
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  24. Ren Jiyu (2010). Examine Confucianism From Wider Perspectives. Contemporary Chinese Thought 41 (4):61-68.score: 132.0
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  25. Shih-Yu Kuo (2011). Climate Change and the Ecological Intelligence of Confucius. Journal of Global Ethics 7 (2):185 - 194.score: 126.0
    Confucius is conventionally regarded as the founder of secular humanism and as a philosopher concerned about humans and culture. I would add to this that Confucius should also be read as an environmental philosopher. One reason is the pedagogical dimension in Confucianism, which points to Confucius as an environmental educator ? not the least of which since much of environmental education relies on common sense and an enlightened collective self-interest. Another reason is an aspect I call ?ecological (...)
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  26. Sor-hoon Tan (2010). Authoritative Master Kong (Confucius) in an Authoritarian Age. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):137-149.score: 126.0
    Employing the distinction between the authoritarian (based on coercion) and the authoritative (based on excellence), this study of the understanding of authority in the Analects argues against interpretations of Confucianism which cast Confucius himself as advocating authoritarianism. Passages with key notions such as shang 上 and xia 下; fu 服 and cong 從; quan 權 and wei 威, are analyzed to illuminate ideas of hierarchy, obedience, and the nature of authority itself in the text. The evidence pieced together reveals (...)
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  27. Shiling Xiang (2010). Inquiry Into the Transcendence of Tang Dynasty Confucians to Han Dynasty Confucians and the Transformation of Traditional Confucianism in Terms of Lunyu Bijie. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):471-485.score: 126.0
    Neo-Confucianism of the Han and Tang dynasties is an indispensable part of the history of Chinese philosophy. From Han dynasty Confucians to Tang dynasty Confucians, the study of Confucian classics evolved progressively from textual research to conceptual explanation. A significant sign of this transformation is the book Lunyu Bijie 论语笔解 (A Written Explanation of the Analects), co-authored by Han Yu and Li Ao. Making use of the tremendous room for interpretation within the Analects, the book studied and reorganized the relationship (...)
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  28. Wiebke Denecke (2010). The Dynamics of Masters Literature: Early Chinese Thought From Confucius to Han Feizi. Distributed by Harvard University Press.score: 126.0
    Introduction: Chinese philosophy and the translation of disciplines -- The faces of masters literature until the Eastern Han -- Scenes of instruction and master bodies in the Analects -- From scenes of instruction to scenes of construction: Mozi -- Interiority, human nature, and exegesis in Mencius -- Authorship, human nature, and persuasion in Xunzi -- The race for precedence: polemics and the vacuum of traditions in Laozi -- Zhuangzi and the art of negation -- The self-regulating state, paranoia, and rhetoric (...)
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  29. Peimin Ni, Confucius Making the Way Great, Rediscovering China Series.score: 126.0
    Through a systematic "gongfu" reading of Confucius, this book shows how Confucius' ideas are different from dogmatized or overly intellectualistic understandings of Confucianism and how the Master s insights can be a rich resource for re-enchanting the world and the contemporary life. Review: The book is a thoughtful and inspiring presentation of Confucianism as arguably the longest and most influential ethical and spiritual traditions in human history. It is highly readable with many insightful observations.
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  30. Jiang Qing (2011). From Mind Confucianism to Political Confucianism. In. In Ruiping Fan (ed.), The Renaissance of Confucianism in Contemporary China. Springer. 17--32.score: 126.0
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  31. JeeLoo Liu (2011). Readings From the Lu-Wang School of Neo-Confucianism (Review). Philosophy East and West 61 (2):388-391.score: 120.0
  32. David L. Hall & Roger T. Ames (1984). Getting It Right: On Saving Confucius From the Confucians. Philosophy East and West 34 (1):3-23.score: 120.0
  33. Wing-Tsit Chan (1967). Neo-Confucianism: New Ideas in Old Terminology. Philosophy East and West 17 (1/4):15-35.score: 120.0
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  34. Y. P. Mei (1956). Book Review:A History of Chinese Philosophy. Yulan Fung; Religious Trends in Modern China. Wing-Tsit Chan; Chinese Thought: From Confucius to Mao Tse-Tung. H. G. Creel; Studies in Chinese Thought. Arthur F. Wright. [REVIEW] Ethics 66 (4):299-.score: 120.0
  35. Martin Schonfeld (2006). From Confucius to Kant—the Question of Information Transfer. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (1):67–81.score: 120.0
  36. Freya Boedicker (2009). The Philosophy of Tai Chi Chuan: Wisdom From Confucius, Lao Tzu, and Other Great Thinkers. Blue Snake Books.score: 120.0
    Each chapter of this concise volume focuses on a single work or philosopher, and includes a short history of each one as well as a description of their ...
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  37. John Berthrong (2003). From Xunzi to Boston Confucianism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (3-4):433-450.score: 120.0
  38. Wu Wenyi (2013). Peng, Guoxiang 彭國翔, Interpretation and Examination of Confucian Tradition: From Classical Confucianism, Neo-Confucianism to New Confucianism 儒家傳統的诠釋與思辨——從先秦儒學、宋明理學到現代新儒學. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (1):133-136.score: 120.0
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  39. Yin Lujun (1994). From Montague to Neo-Confucianism: Feng Youlan's "New Lixue" and Logical Analysis. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 21 (3-4):337-361.score: 120.0
  40. Gang Xu (1999). The Aesthetic in Confucianism Examined From Three Viewpoints. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (4):425-444.score: 120.0
  41. Ralph Weber, Rezension Von: DENECKE, Wiebke: The Dynamics of Masters Literature: Early Chinese Thought From Confucius to Han Feizi, Cambridge (Massachusetts) and London: Harvard University Press, 2010.score: 120.0
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  42. Wing-Tsit Chan (1978). Patterns forneo-confucianism: Why Chu Hsia differed from Ch'eng I. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 5 (2):101-126.score: 120.0
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  43. Karyn L. Lai (2012). Knowing to Act in the Moment: Examples From Confucius'Analects. Asian Philosophy 22 (4):347-364.score: 120.0
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  44. Guo Jue (2014). The Dynamics of Masters Literature: Early Chinese Thought From Confucius to Han Fei Zi by Wiebke Denecke. Philosophy East and West 64 (1):240-249.score: 120.0
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  45. Liu Ke (2003). The Influence of Confucianism and Taoism on Cultural Psychology Viewed From Stone-Carved Pictures About Ascending to Immortality. Religious Studies 1:002.score: 120.0
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  46. Margaret Knight & Jim Herrick (eds.) (1995). Humanist Anthology: From Confucius to Attenborough. Prometheus Books.score: 120.0
     
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  47. 陆 建华 (2012). 何为孔子之道—从孔子弟子的视角看
    What is the Tao of Confucius—From the Perspective of Confucius Disciples.
    Advances in Philosophy 1 (1):1-4.
    score: 120.0
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  48. Herrlee Glessner Creel (1953). Chinese Thought, From Confucius to Mao Tsê-Tung. [Chicago]University of Chicago Press.score: 120.0
     
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  49. Ym Grosjean (1988). From Confucius to Feminism: The Japanese Woman's Quest for Meaning in Women's Studies. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 11 (3):166-182.score: 120.0
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  50. Lo Hsiang-Lin (1976). An Inquiry Into the Doctrinal System of Confucius From the Lun-Yü. Contemporary Chinese Thought 8 (1):57-76.score: 120.0
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