Search results for 'Conscience Christianity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  21
    Reasonableness Of Christianity (2010). The Reasonableness of Christianity and its Vindications. In S. J. Savonius-Wroth Paul Schuurman & Jonathen Walmsley (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Locke. Continuum
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  2. H. S. Nash (1898). Genesis of the Social Conscience. The Relation Between the Establishment of Christianity in Europe and the Social Question. The Monist 8:156.
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  3.  20
    Timothy C. Potts (ed.) (1980). Conscience in Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents in translation writings by six medieval philosophers which bear on the subject of conscience. Conscience, which can be considered both as a topic in the philosophy of mind and a topic in ethics, has been unduly neglected in modern philosophy, where a prevailing belief in the autonomy of ethics leaves it no natural place. It was, however, a standard subject for a treatise in medieval philosophy. Three introductory translations here, from Jerome, Augustine and Peter Lombard, (...)
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  4. Thomas D. Williams (2008). Knowing Right From Wrong: A Christian Guide to Conscience. Faith Words.
    Father Williams explains how the conscience is formed through our training and experiences and informed by the Holy Spirit, making it an essential tool for daily living. He uses familiar and surprising characters to illustrate the positive choices conscience can direct--and the disaster that results when a conscience is undeveloped or ignored. Questions he tackles include "Is it more important to be smart or good?""Is there a morally right thing to do in every situation?" and "Is the (...)
     
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  5. Felix M. Podimattam (2009). The Challenge of Conscience. Media House.
     
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  6. Richard N. Rwiza (2001). Formation of Christian Conscience in Modern Africa. Paulines Publications Africa.
     
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  7.  7
    Bob Tennant (2011). Conscience, Consciousness and Ethics in Joseph Butler's Philosophy and Ministry. Boydell Press.
    out a visitation and a thorough assessment of his diocese. His predecessor (or rather his friend Benson, the bishop of Gloucester, who during Edward Chandler's decline had managed Durham's affairs) had kept the deanery records in good ...
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  8.  7
    Oddbjørn Leirvik (2006). Human Conscience and Muslim-Christian Relations: Modern Egyptian Thinkers on Al-Ḍamīr. Routledge.
    "Human Conscience and Muslim-Christian Relations provides an insight into the notion of conscience and the impact of Christian-Muslim relations in Egypt on the ...
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  9.  9
    James Calvin Davis (2005). William Ames's Calvinist Ambiguity Over Freedom of Conscience. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):333 - 355.
    Reformed Christianity's qualified embrace of freedom of conscience is per- haps best represented by William Ames (1576-1633). This essay explores Ames's interpretation of conscience, his understanding of its relationship to natural law, Scripture, and civil authority, and his vacillation on the sub- ject of conscientious freedom. By rooting his interpretation of conscience in natural law, Ames provided a foundation for conscience as an authority whose convictions are binding and worthy of some civil respect and free- (...)
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  10.  7
    James Edward Gough & Sue Matheson (2013). Nietzsche and Bad Conscience on Mosquito Coast. Film-Philosophy 17 (1):234-244.
    Conscience plays a crucial role in identifying, applying, and initiating actions chosen as right or wrong. In this paper, we pursue an answer to the question, Can bad conscience, as Nietzsche defines it, be overcome to form the ground for the creation of good conscience? Nietzsche identifies Christianity as the source of that which has to be overcome to help re-define human existence--overcoming self-destructive, bad conscience. To understand whether someone could (or even should) overcome and (...)
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  11. Mary Aloysius Adimonye (2002). My Conscience: My Guiding Light. Snaap Press.
    ch. 1. Conscience--the subjective norm of morality -- ch. 2. Conscience and law -- ch. 3. Relationship between conscience and law -- ch. 4. Holy Scipture on the nature of conscience -- ch. 5. Freedom and commitment of conscience -- ch. 6. The African and conscience with particular reference to the Igbos of Nigeria -- ch. 7. Igbo moral conscience in the light of cross-cultural education: Western civilisation and christianity.
     
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  12.  7
    J. Budziszewski (2003). What We Can't Not Know: A Guide. Spence Pub. Co..
    In this new revised edition of his groundbreaking work, Professor J. Budziszewski questions the modern assumption that moral truths are unknowable.
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  13. Mathias Risse (2001). The Second Treatise in in the Genealogy of Morality: Nietzsche on the Origin of the Bad Conscience. European Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):55–81.
    On a postcard to Franz Overbeck from January 4, 1888, Nietzsche makes some illuminating remarks with respect to the three treatises in his book On the Genealogy of Morality.2 Nietzsche says that, ‘for the sake of clarity, it was necessary artificially to isolate the different roots of that complex structure that is called morality. Each of these three treatises expresses a single primum mobile; a fourth and fifth are missing, as is even the most essential (‘the herd instinct’) – for (...)
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  14. David H. Smith (1986). Health and Medicine in the Anglican Tradition Conscience, Community, and Compromise. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  15.  55
    Jeff Spinner-Halev (2005). Hinduism, Christianity, and Liberal Religious Toleration. Political Theory 33 (1):28 - 57.
    The Protestant conception of religion as a private matter of conscience organized into voluntary associations informed early liberalism's conception of religion and of religious toleration, assumptions that are still present in contemporary liberalism. In many other religions, however, including Hinduism (the main though not only focus of this article), practice has a much larger role than conscience. Hinduism is not a voluntary association, and the structure of its practices, some of which are inegalitarian, makes exit very difficult. This (...)
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  16.  54
    David Lindstedt (1997). The Progression and Regression of Slave Morality in Nietzsche's Genealogy: The Moralization of Bad Conscience and Indebtedness. [REVIEW] Man and World 30 (1):83-105.
    With the advent of slave morality and the belief system it entails, human beings alone begin to advance to a level beyond that of simple, brute, animal nature. While Christianity and its belief system generate a progression, however, allowing human beings to become interesting for the first time, Nietzsche also maintains in the Genealogy that slave morality is a regression, somehow lowering or bringing them down from a possible higher level. In this paper I will argue that this is (...)
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  17.  10
    Jan Konior (2010). Confession Rituals and the Philosophy of Forgiveness in Asian Religions and Christianity. Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 15 (1):91-102.
    In this paper I will take into account the historical, religious and philosophical aspects of the examination of conscience, penance and satisfaction, as well as ritual confession and cure, in Confucianism, Buddhism and Taoism. I will also take into account the difficulties that baptized Chinese Christians met in sacramental Catholic confession. Human history proves that in every culture and religion, man has always had a need to be cleansed from evil and experience mutual forgiveness. What ritual models were used (...)
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  18. Alexandre Ganoczy (2004). Cerveau et conscience en anthropologie théologique. Recherches de Science Religieuse 3 (3):349-381.
    Les neurosciences modernes, notamment les découvertes récentes de la recherche sur le cerveau, réclament de plus en plus un changement radical dans leurs tenants et aboutissants philosophiques, loin en particulier de l’anthropologie théologique du Christianisme qui s’appuya pendant de longs siècles sur la conception philosophique dualiste de l’union entre corps et âme. Dans cet essai, A. Ganoczy veut d’abord exposer des acquis de la recherche sur le cerveau qui entraînent, chez les uns, une conception matérialiste et, chez les autres, une (...)
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  19.  30
    Marek Piechowiak (2016). Thomas Aquinas – Human Dignity and Conscience as a Basis for Restricting Legal Obligations. Diametros 47:64-83.
    In contemporary positive law there are legal institutions, such as conscientious objection in the context of military service or “conscience clauses” in medical law, which for the sake of respect for judgments of conscience aim at restricting legal obligations. Such restrictions are postulated to protect human freedom in general. On the basis of Thomas Aquinas’ philosophy, it shall be argued that human dignity, understood as the existential perfection of a human being based on special unity, provides a foundation (...)
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  20. Carolyn McLeod (2011). Taking a Feminist Relational Perspective on Conscience. In Jocelyn Downie & Jennifer Lewellyn (eds.), Being Relational: Reflections on Relational Theory and Health Law and Policy. University of British Columbia Press
    One understanding of conscience dominates bioethical discussion about conscience. On this view, to have a conscience is to be compelled to act in accordance with one’s own moral values for the sake of one’s “integrity,” where integrity is understood as inner or psychological unity. Conscience is deemed valuable because it promotes this quality. In this paper, I describe the dominant view, attempt to show that it is flawed, and sketch a positive alternative to it. In my (...)
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  21. Lori Kantymir & Carolyn McLeod (2013). Justification for Conscience Exemptions in Health Care. Bioethics 27 (8):16-23.
    Some bioethicists argue that conscientious objectors in health care should have to justify themselves, just as objectors in the military do. They should have to provide reasons that explain why they should be exempt from offering the services that they find offensive. There are two versions of this view in the literature, each giving different standards of justification. We show these views are each either too permissive (i.e. would result in problematic exemptions based on conscience) or too restrictive (i.e. (...)
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  22.  31
    Owen Ware (2016). Fichte on Conscience. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 92 (2).
    There is no question that Fichte's theory of conscience is central to his system of ethics. Yet his descriptions of its role in practical deliberation appear inconsistent, if not contradictory. Many scholars have claimed that for Fichte conscience plays a material role by providing the content of our moral obligations—the Material Function View. Some have denied this, however, claiming that conscience only plays a formal role by testing our moral convictions in any given case—the Formal Function View. (...)
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  23.  56
    Kimberley Brownlee (2012). Conscience and Conviction: The Case for Civil Disobedience. Oxford University Press.
    This book shows that civil disobedience is generally more defensible than private conscientious objection. -/- Part I explores the morality of conviction and conscience. Each of these concepts informs a distinct argument for civil disobedience. The conviction argument begins with the communicative principle of conscientiousness. According to this principle, having a conscientious moral conviction means not just acting consistently with our beliefs and judging ourselves and others by a common moral standard. It also means not seeking to evade the (...)
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  24. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2008). What is Conscience and Why is Respect for It so Important? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):135-149.
    The literature on conscience in medicine has paid little attention to what is meant by the word ‘conscience.’ This article distinguishes between retrospective and prospective conscience, distinguishes synderesis from conscience, and argues against intuitionist views of conscience. Conscience is defined as having two interrelated parts: (1) a commitment to morality itself; to acting and choosing morally according to the best of one’s ability, and (2) the activity of judging that an act one has done (...)
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  25. Brian Besong (2014). The Prudent Conscience View. International Philosophical Quarterly 54 (2):127-141.
    Moral intuitionism, which claims that some moral seemings are justification-conferring, has become an increasingly popular account in moral epistemology. Defenses of the position have largely focused on the standard account, according to which the justification-conferring power of a moral seeming is determined by its phenomenal credentials alone. Unfortunately, the standard account is a less plausible version of moral intuitionism because it does not take etiology seriously. In this paper, I provide an outline and defense of a non-standard account of moral (...)
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  26.  62
    Candice Delmas (2015). False Convictions and True Conscience. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 35 (2):403-425.
    Society typically shows conscientious objectors more deference than civil disobedients, on the grounds that they appear more conscientious and less strategically minded than the latter. Kimberley Brownlee challenges this standard picture in Conscience and Conviction: The Case for Civil Disobedience, where she claims that civil disobedience is more conscientious than conscientious objection, in virtue of its communicativeness. Brownlee conceives of conscientious conviction as necessarily communicative, and distinguishes it from ‘conscience’—the set of practical moral skills involved in adequately responding (...)
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  27. Chloë Fitzgerald (2014). A Neglected Aspect of Conscience: Awareness of Implicit Attitudes. Bioethics 28 (1):24-32.
    The conception of conscience that dominates discussions in bioethics focuses narrowly on private regulation of behaviour resulting from explicit attitudes. It neglects to mention implicit attitudes and the role of social feedback in becoming aware of one's implicit attitudes. But if conscience is a way of ensuring that a person's behaviour is in line with her moral values, it must be responsive to all aspects of the mind that influence behaviour. There is a wealth of recent psychological work (...)
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  28.  94
    Kenneth E. Goodpaster (2007). Conscience and Corporate Culture. Blackwell Pub..
    Conscience and Corporate Culture advances the constructive dialogue on a moral conscience for corporations. Written for educators in the field of business ethics and practicing corporate executives, the book serves as a platform on a subject profoundly difficult and timely. Written from the unique vantage point of an author who is a philosopher, professor of business administration, and a corporate consultant A vital resource for both educators in the field of business ethics and practicing corporate executives Forwards the (...)
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  29. Donovan Miyasaki (2010). Nietzsche Contra Freud on Bad Conscience. Nietzsche-Studien 39 (1):434-454.
    While much has been made of the similarities between the work of Nietzsche and Freud, insufficient attention has been paid to their differences. Even where they have been noted, the degree of these differences, which sometimes approaches direct opposition, has often been underestimated. In the following essay, I will suggest that on the topic of conscience Nietzsche and Freud have radically opposed views, with profoundly different moral consequences. Despite superficial similarities, Nietzsche’s conception of conscience is opposed to that (...)
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  30.  42
    Marijana Vujošević (2014). The Judge in the Mirror: Kant on Conscience. Kantian Review 19 (3):449-474.
    Kant's conception of conscience has been relatively neglected by Kant scholars and the secondary literature offers no explanation of whether (and if so, how) his treatments of conscience fit together. To achieve a fuller understanding of Kant's general position on conscience, I question the widespread assumption that conscience is a feeling and account for the nature of conscience and its multiple functions. On my reading, conscience is ‘the internal judge’ whose verdict triggers certain emotional (...)
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  31.  33
    Michel Henry (2003). I Am the Truth: Toward a Philosophy of Christianity. Stanford University Press.
    A part of the “return to religion” now evident in European philosophy, this book represents the culmination of the career of a leading phenomenological thinker whose earlier works trace a trajectory from Marx through a genealogy of psychoanalysis that interprets Descartes’s “I think, I am” as “I feel myself thinking, I am.” In this book, Henry does not ask whether Christianity is “true” or “false.” Rather, what is in question here is what Christianity considers as truth, what kind (...)
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  32.  98
    Michelle Kosch (2014). Practical Deliberation and the Voice of Conscience in Fichte's 1798 System of Ethics. Philosophers' Imprint 14 (30).
    J.G. Fichte’s 1798 System of Ethics is seldom read, despite the fact that it remains, after more than two centuries, one of the most original and insightful efforts at a systematic normative ethical theory on Kantian foundations. Part of the reason for its obscurity lies in the perceived implausibility of Fichte’s account of practical deliberation and of the authority of individual conscience. The view typically attributed to Fichte is a conjunction of four claims: that moral deliberation consists entirely in (...)
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  33.  4
    Peter N. Jordan (2016). Minimalist Engagement: Rowan Williams on Christianity and Science. Zygon 51 (2):387-404.
    During his time as Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams addressed the relations between Christianity and science at some length. While many contemporary theologians have explored the natural sciences in detail and have deployed scientific ideas and concepts in their theological work, Williams's writings suggest that theology has little need for natural scientific knowledge. For Williams, the created order's relationship to God renders the content of scientific theories about how finite causes are materially constituted and interact of little theological importance. (...)
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  34.  62
    Eva LaFollette & Hugh LaFollette (2007). Private Conscience, Public Acts. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (5):249-254.
    A growing number of medical professionals claim a right of conscience, a right to refuse to perform any professional duty they deem immoral—and to do so with impunity. We argue that professionals do not have the unqualified right of conscience. At most they have a highly qualified right. We focus on the claims of pharmacists, since they are the professionals most commonly claiming this right.
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  35.  6
    Gianni Vattimo (2010). Christianity, Truth, and Weakening Faith: A Dialogue. Columbia University Press.
    Through an exchange that is both intimate and enlightening, Vattimo and Girard share their unparalleled insight into the relationships among religion, modernity, and the role of Christianity, especially as it exists in our multicultural ...
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  36. George Kateb (2009). Locke and the Political Origins of Secularism. Social Research: An International Quarterly 76 (4):1001-1034.
    The paper tries to show the importance of the writings of John Locke in preparing the way for secularism. He provides a theory for disentangling religion and the state for several main reasons, including the avoidance of religious persecution of minorties; the avoidance of civil strife; and the need to leave it to individuals to work out their own salvation by exercising their conscience free of state interference. Locke is a creative theorist; his creativity shows itself in the new (...)
     
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  37.  13
    John Smith, Oppenheim E., M. Frank & Josiah Royce (2001). The Problem of Christianity. Cath Univ Amer Pr.
    Josiah Royce’s late masterpiece, ’The Problem of Christianity’, is based on a series of lectures he delivered at Manchester College, Oxford, in 1913. It presents his philosophical interpretation of Christianity’s fundamental ideas--community, sin, atonement, and saving grace; shows their relevance to the current confluence of world religions; and grounds his position upon a personal transformation into genuine loyalty toward the community of the entire human family. (publisher, edited).
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  38. Karen Armstrong (1993). A History of God: The 4000-Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Gramercy Books.
    Over 700,000 copies of the original hardcover and paperback editions of this stunningly popular book have been sold. Karen Armstrong's superbly readable exploration of how the three dominant monotheistic religions of the world—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—have shaped and altered the conception of God is a tour de force. One of Britain's foremost commentators on religious affairs, Armstrong traces the history of how men and women have perceived and experienced God, from the time of Abraham to the present. From classical (...)
     
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  39.  67
    Yiftach Fehige (2013). Sexual Diversity and Divine Creation: A Tightrope Walk Between Christianity and Science. Zygon 48 (1):35-59.
    Although modern societies have come to recognize diversity in human sexuality as simply part of nature, many Christian communities and thinkers still have considerable difficulties with related developments in politics, legislation, and science. In fact, homosexuality is a recurrent topic in the transdisciplinary encounter between Christianity and the sciences, an encounter that is otherwise rather “asexual.” I propose that the recent emergence of “Christianity and Science” as an academic field in its own right is an important part of (...)
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  40.  58
    Y. Michael Barilan & Margherita Brusa (2011). Triangular Reflective Equilibrium: A Conscience-Based Method for Bioethical Deliberation. Bioethics 25 (6):304-319.
    Following a discussion of some historical roots of conscience, we offer a systematized version of reflective equilibrium. Aiming at a comprehensive methodology for bioethical deliberation, we develop an expanded variant of reflective equilibrium, which we call ‘triangular reflective equilibrium’ and which incorporates insights from hermeneutics, critical theory and narrative ethics.We focus on a few distinctions, mainly between methods of justification in ethics and the social practice of bioethical deliberation, between coherence in ethical reasoning, personal integrity and consensus formation, and (...)
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  41.  18
    A. K. Koekkoek (2002). Book Review.(Review of the Book De Reformatorische Rechtsstaatsgedachte, 1999, 9051894384). [REVIEW] Philosophia Reformata: Orgaan van de Vereeniging Voor Calvinistische Wijsbegeerte 6 (2):204-206.
    Books Reviewed in this Article: Reason, Truth and History. By Hilary Putnam. Pp.xii, 222, Cambridge University Press, 1982, £15.00 , £4.95 . Fundamentals of philosophy. By David Stewart and H. Gene Blocker. Pp.xiii, 378, New York, Macmillan, 1982, £12.95. Modern Philosophy: An Introduction. By A.R. Lacey. Pp.vii, 246, London and Boston, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1982, £7.95 , £3.95 . Merleau‐Ponty's Philosophy. By Samuel B. Mallin. Pp.xi, 302, New Haven and London, Yale University Press, 1979, £14.20. Thought and Object: Essays (...)
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  42.  7
    Jean Nedelea (2015). Christianity and Non-Christian Religions in Karl Rahner’s Vision. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 14 (42):54-77.
    In the context of the late modernity, Karl Rahner endeavoured to offer a theological solution to the current and complicated issue of the religious pluralism. What are the apriorical anthropological data of religions? Has God revealed Himself in a redeeming way also in the extra-biblical religions? Is it still possible to postulate a universal salvation way and an absolute religious truth? Is it possible to acknowledge other religions as ways of salvation and their prophets redeeming, at the same time calling (...)
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  43.  45
    Xinzhong Yao (1996). Confucianism and Christianity: A Comparative Study of Jen and Agape. Distributed in the U.S. By International Specialized Bk. Services.
    The underlying idea presented in this book is that there are similarities as well as differences between Confucianism as Humanistic tradition and Christianity ...
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  44.  47
    Dean Moyar (2008). Unstable Autonomy: Conscience and Judgment in Kant's Moral Philosophy. Journal of Moral Philosophy 5 (3):327-360.
    In this paper I argue that Kant's claims about conscience in his moral writings of the 1790s reveal a fundamental instability in his moral philosophy. The central issue is the relationship between the moral law as the form of universality and the judgment of individuals about specific cases. Against Thomas Hill's claim that Kant has only a limited role for conscience, I argue that conscience has a comprehensive role in Kantian deliberation. I unpack the claims about (...) in the Metaphysics of Morals to show that they describe conscience as both a basic act of self-consciousness and as an all-things-considered judgment. I outline the role of conscience in moral motivation, and argue that taken together Kant's writings about conscience reveal a way to rethink Kant's conception of the Fact of Reason. (shrink)
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  45. Søren Kierkegaard (2004). Training in Christianity. Vintage Books.
    Kierkegaard struck out against all forms of established order–including the established church–that work to make men complacent with themselves and thereby obscure their personal responsibility to encounter God. He considered Training in Christianity his most important book. It represented his effort to replace what he believed had become "an amiable, sentimental paganism" with authentic Christianity. Kierkegaard's challenge to live out the implications of Christianity in the most personal decisions of life will greatly appeal to readers today who (...)
     
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  46.  5
    Richard W. Miller (1992). Moral Differences: Truth, Justice, and Conscience in a World of Conflict. Princeton University Press.
    In a wide-ranging inquiry Richard W. Miller provides new resources for coping with the most troubling types of moral conflict: disagreements in moral conviction, conflicting interests, and the tension between conscience and desires. Drawing on most fields in philosophy and the social sciences, including his previous work in the philosophy of science, he presents an account of our access to moral truth, and, within this framework, develops a theory of justice and an assessment of the role of morality in (...)
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  47.  16
    Sean Murphy & Stephen J. Genuis (2013). Freedom of Conscience in Health Care: Distinctions and Limits. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):347-354.
    The widespread emergence of innumerable technologies within health care has complicated the choices facing caregivers and their patients. The escalation of knowledge and technical innovation has been accompanied by an erosion of moral and ethical consensus among health providers that is reflected in the abandonment of the Hippocratic Oath as the immutable bedrock of medical ethics. Ethical conflicts arise when the values of health professionals collide with the expressed wishes of patients or the dictates of regulatory bodies and administrators. Increasing (...)
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  48.  13
    Lucas A. Swaine (2003). Institutions of Conscience: Politics and Principle in a World of Religious Pluralism. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 6 (1):93-118.
    This article considers the difficult question of whether there are any reasons for theocratic religious devotees to affirm liberalism and liberal institutions. Swaine argues not only that there are reasons for theocrats to affirm liberalism, but that theocrats are committed rationally to three normative principles of liberty of conscience, as well. Swaine subsequently discusses three institutional and strategic implications of his arguments. First, he outlines an option of semisovereignty for theocratic communities in liberal democracies, and explains why an appropriate (...)
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  49.  56
    Peter Forrest (2010). Spinozistic Pantheism, the Environment and Christianity. Sophia 49 (4):463-473.
    I am not a pantheist and I don’t believe that pantheism is consistent with Christianity. My preferred speculation is what I call the Swiss Cheese theory: we and our artefacts are the holes in God, the only Godless parts of reality. In this paper, I begin by considering a world rather like ours but without any beings capable of sin. Ignoring extraterrestrials and angels we could consider the world, say, 5 million years ago. Pantheism was, I say, true at (...)
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  50.  15
    François Boucher & Cécile Laborde (forthcoming). Why Tolerate Conscience? Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-21.
    In Why Tolerate Religion?, Brian Leiter argues against the special legal status of religion, claiming that religion should not be the only ground for exemptions to the law and that this form of protection should be, in principle, available for the claims of secular conscience as well. However, in the last chapter of his book, he objects to a universal regime of exemptions for both religious and secular claims of conscience, highlighting the practical and moral flaws associated with (...)
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