Search results for 'Conscience Christianity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Thomas D. Williams (2008). Knowing Right From Wrong: A Christian Guide to Conscience. Faith Words.score: 108.0
    Father Williams explains how the conscience is formed through our training and experiences and informed by the Holy Spirit, making it an essential tool for daily living. He uses familiar and surprising characters to illustrate the positive choices conscience can direct--and the disaster that results when a conscience is undeveloped or ignored. Questions he tackles include "Is it more important to be smart or good?""Is there a morally right thing to do in every situation?" and "Is the (...)
     
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  2. Oddbjørn Leirvik (2006). Human Conscience and Muslim-Christian Relations: Modern Egyptian Thinkers on Al-Ḍamīr. Routledge.score: 96.0
    "Human Conscience and Muslim-Christian Relations provides an insight into the notion of conscience and the impact of Christian-Muslim relations in Egypt on the ...
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  3. Richard N. Rwiza (2001). Formation of Christian Conscience in Modern Africa. Paulines Publications Africa.score: 96.0
     
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  4. Timothy C. Potts (ed.) (1980). Conscience in Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 84.0
    This book presents in translation writings by six medieval philosophers which bear on the subject of conscience. Conscience, which can be considered both as a topic in the philosophy of mind and a topic in ethics, has been unduly neglected in modern philosophy, where a prevailing belief in the autonomy of ethics leaves it no natural place. It was, however, a standard subject for a treatise in medieval philosophy. Three introductory translations here, from Jerome, Augustine and Peter Lombard, (...)
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  5. Reasonableness Of Christianity (2010). The Reasonableness of Christianity and its Vindications. In S. J. Savonius-Wroth Paul Schuurman & Jonathen Walmsley (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Locke. Continuum.score: 80.0
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  6. Bob Tennant (2011). Conscience, Consciousness and Ethics in Joseph Butler's Philosophy and Ministry. Boydell Press.score: 78.0
    out a visitation and a thorough assessment of his diocese. His predecessor (or rather his friend Benson, the bishop of Gloucester, who during Edward Chandler's decline had managed Durham's affairs) had kept the deanery records in good ...
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  7. Felix M. Podimattam (2009). The Challenge of Conscience. Media House.score: 78.0
     
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  8. Mary Aloysius Adimonye (2002). My Conscience: My Guiding Light. Snaap Press.score: 66.0
    ch. 1. Conscience--the subjective norm of morality -- ch. 2. Conscience and law -- ch. 3. Relationship between conscience and law -- ch. 4. Holy Scipture on the nature of conscience -- ch. 5. Freedom and commitment of conscience -- ch. 6. The African and conscience with particular reference to the Igbos of Nigeria -- ch. 7. Igbo moral conscience in the light of cross-cultural education: Western civilisation and christianity.
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  9. J. Budziszewski (2003/2011). What We Can't Not Know: A Guide. Spence Pub. Co..score: 60.0
    In this new revised edition of his groundbreaking work, Professor J. Budziszewski questions the modern assumption that moral truths are unknowable.
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  10. James Calvin Davis (2005). William Ames's Calvinist Ambiguity Over Freedom of Conscience. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):333 - 355.score: 54.0
    Reformed Christianity's qualified embrace of freedom of conscience is per- haps best represented by William Ames (1576-1633). This essay explores Ames's interpretation of conscience, his understanding of its relationship to natural law, Scripture, and civil authority, and his vacillation on the sub- ject of conscientious freedom. By rooting his interpretation of conscience in natural law, Ames provided a foundation for conscience as an authority whose convictions are binding and worthy of some civil respect and free- (...)
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  11. James Edward Gough & Sue Matheson (2013). Nietzsche and Bad Conscience on Mosquito Coast. Film-Philosophy 17 (1):234-244.score: 54.0
    Conscience plays a crucial role in identifying, applying, and initiating actions chosen as right or wrong. In this paper, we pursue an answer to the question, Can bad conscience, as Nietzsche defines it, be overcome to form the ground for the creation of good conscience? Nietzsche identifies Christianity as the source of that which has to be overcome to help re-define human existence--overcoming self-destructive, bad conscience. To understand whether someone could (or even should) overcome and (...)
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  12. Mathias Risse (2001). The Second Treatise in in the Genealogy of Morality: Nietzsche on the Origin of the Bad Conscience. European Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):55–81.score: 42.0
    On a postcard to Franz Overbeck from January 4, 1888, Nietzsche makes some illuminating remarks with respect to the three treatises in his book On the Genealogy of Morality.2 Nietzsche says that, ‘for the sake of clarity, it was necessary artificially to isolate the different roots of that complex structure that is called morality. Each of these three treatises expresses a single primum mobile; a fourth and fifth are missing, as is even the most essential (‘the herd instinct’) – for (...)
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  13. Benedict (2006). On Conscience: Two Essays. Natl Catholic Bioethics Center.score: 40.0
    Foreword This small volume contains two essays on conscience by Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, now Pope Benedict XVI, written while he was Prefect of the ...
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  14. Peter Godman (2009). Paradoxes of Conscience in the High Middle Ages: Abelard, Heloise, and the Archpoet. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    Moral moments -- The neurotic and the penitent -- True, false, and feigned penance -- Fame without conscience -- Cain and conscience -- Feminine paradoxes -- Sincere hypocrisy -- The poetical consience -- Envoi : spiritual sophistry.
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  15. Archibald Chisholm (1934). Conscience; its Nature and Authority. London, Nisbet & Co. Ltd..score: 36.0
     
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  16. Piero Bargellini (1958). The Unquiet Conscience. Stamperia Del Santuccio].score: 32.0
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  17. John Haas (ed.) (1996). Crisis of Conscience. Crossroad Pub. Co..score: 32.0
     
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  18. Kevin T. Kelly (1967). Conscience: A Study in Seventeenth Century English Protestant Moral Theology. G. Chapman.score: 32.0
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  19. Anne E. Patrick (1996). Liberating Conscience: Feminist Explorations in Catholic Moral Theology. Continuum.score: 32.0
     
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  20. L. G. Crocker (1982). The Merchant of Venice and Christian Conscience. Diogenes 30 (118):77-102.score: 30.0
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  21. David P. Gauthier (1962). Has Man a Future? By Bertrand Russell. Penguin Books, Toronto, Longmans Canada Ltd. 1962, P. 128. .60¢Nuclear Weapons and Christian Conscience. Edited by Walter Stein. London, Merlin Press. 1961, P. 151. $3.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 1 (02):230-231.score: 30.0
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  22. Pere Jean-Michel Garrigues (2003). The Christian Religious Conscience and the Shoah. Philosophia 30 (1-4):99-105.score: 30.0
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  23. Patrick Goold (1987). Kierkegaard's Christian Imperative. Faith and Philosophy 4 (3):304-318.score: 30.0
    This paper describes a strategy for defending some of the core claims of Christianity from evidentialist critics. The strategy is neither epistemological nor based on considerations of ‘proper basicality’. Indeed, this strategy, if successful, shows Christian faith to be notmerely permissible but ethically obligatory. It does so by taking seriously the claim that faith is a virtue (in the classical sense) and that a reflecting conscience will discover this. The paper also hopes to contribute to Kierkegaard scholarship by (...)
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  24. T. Stearns Eliot (1916). Book Review:Conscience and Christ: Six Lectures on Christian Ethics. Hastings Rashdall. [REVIEW] Ethics 27 (1):111-.score: 30.0
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  25. John Coventry & J. S. (1966). Christian Conscience. Heythrop Journal 7 (2):145–160.score: 30.0
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  26. G. T. Brown (2012). Discovery and Revelation: The Consciences of Christians, Public Policy, and Bioethics Debate. Christian Bioethics 18 (1):41-58.score: 28.0
    Health care begins as an act of conscience, which urges a response to the sick and holds caregivers accountable to moral standards that public authorities ultimately do not define. Conscience nonetheless expresses itself as a type of dialogue within oneself that is influenced by dialogue with others, especially with society in the form of civil law and professional standards. A well-formed conscience for health care relates the foundations of morality to health care practices and contributes sound moral (...)
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  27. J. F. Peppin (1997). The Christian Physician in the Non-Christian Institution: Objections of Conscience and Physician Value Neutrality. Christian Bioethics 3 (1):39-54.score: 28.0
    Christian physicians are in danger of losing the right of conscientious objection in situations they deem immoral. The erosion of this right is bolstered by the doctrine of "physician value neutrality" (PVN) which may be an impetus for the push to require physicians to refer for procedures they find immoral. It is only a small step from referral to compelling performance of these same procedures. If no one particular value is more morally correct than any other (a foundational PVN premise) (...)
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  28. Mark J. Cherry (2012). Conscience Clauses, the Refusal to Treat, and Civil Disobedience—Practicing Medicine as a Christian in a Hostile Secular Moral Space. Christian Bioethics 18 (1):1-14.score: 26.0
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  29. D. W. Amundsen & O. W. Mandahl (1995). Ecumenical in Spite of Ourselves: A Protestant Assessment of Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Anglican Catholic Approaches to Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 1 (2):213-245.score: 26.0
    A Christian approach to the issues that constitute bioethics is inevitable for us who cherish the truth of historic, creedal, trinitarian Christianity. Scripture teaches and the Greek and Latin Church Fathers as well as the Reformers aver that man, created in the image of God, has an inherent, if vestigial, sense of right and wrong and a conscience however marred by the fall and by rebellion. We must believe that we share this most basic ecumenism with all humanity, (...)
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  30. David Lindstedt (1997). The Progression and Regression of Slave Morality in Nietzsche's Genealogy: The Moralization of Bad Conscience and Indebtedness. [REVIEW] Man and World 30 (1):83-105.score: 24.0
    With the advent of slave morality and the belief system it entails, human beings alone begin to advance to a level beyond that of simple, brute, animal nature. While Christianity and its belief system generate a progression, however, allowing human beings to become interesting for the first time, Nietzsche also maintains in the Genealogy that slave morality is a regression, somehow lowering or bringing them down from a possible higher level. In this paper I will argue that this is (...)
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  31. Jeff Spinner-Halev (2005). Hinduism, Christianity, and Liberal Religious Toleration. Political Theory 33 (1):28 - 57.score: 24.0
    The Protestant conception of religion as a private matter of conscience organized into voluntary associations informed early liberalism's conception of religion and of religious toleration, assumptions that are still present in contemporary liberalism. In many other religions, however, including Hinduism (the main though not only focus of this article), practice has a much larger role than conscience. Hinduism is not a voluntary association, and the structure of its practices, some of which are inegalitarian, makes exit very difficult. This (...)
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  32. Roger Trigg (2012). Equality, Freedom, and Religion. OUP Oxford.score: 24.0
    Is religious freedom being curtailed in pursuit of equality, and the outlawing of discrimination? Is enough effort made to accommodate those motivated by a religious conscience? All rights matter but at times the right to put religious beliefs into practice increasingly takes second place in the law of different countries to the pursuit of other social priorities. The right to freedom of belief and to manifest belief is written into all human rights charters. In the United States religious freedom (...)
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  33. Peter L. Danner (1967). Affluence and the Christian Conscience. Thought 42 (2):214-224.score: 24.0
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  34. Louise Antony (ed.) (2010). Philosophers Without Gods: Meditations on Atheism and the Secular Life. OUP USA.score: 24.0
    Atheists are frequently demonized as arrogant intellectuals, antagonistic to religion, devoid of moral sentiments, advocates of an "anything goes" lifestyle. Now, in this revealing volume, nineteen leading philosophers open a window on the inner life of atheism, shattering these common stereotypes as they reveal how they came to turn away from religious belief. These highly engaging personal essays capture the marvelous diversity to be found among atheists, providing a portrait that will surprise most readers. Many of the authors, for example, (...)
     
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  35. Vrasidas Karalis (2010). Reflections on the Project of a Renewed Polis: After Athens and Jerusalem. Thesis Eleven 102 (1):6-23.score: 24.0
    This article discusses the historical opposition in the Western world between Athens as the centre of democratic political thinking, reason and philosophical knowledge and Jerusalem as the centre of religion, faith and revelation. It examines the historical trajectory of the debate from early Christianity to this day with special emphasis on the work of Leo Strauss and Eric Voegelin; it addresses the relation between faith and reason as two existential and political principles reinforcing each other and explores the symbiotic (...)
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  36. Josef Fuchs (1990). The Absolute in Morality and the Christian Conscience. Gregorianum 71 (4):697-711.score: 24.0
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  37. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (2008). Political Writings of Friedrich Nietzsche: An Edited Anthology. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    Chulpforta, 1862 -- Napoleon III as president -- Saint-just -- Two-poem cycle two kings -- Louis the sixteenth -- Louis the fifteenth -- Agonistic politics, 1871-1874 -- The Greek state, 1871 -- On the future of our educational institutions, third lecture, February 27th, 1872 -- Homer's contest -- Untimely meditations -- David Strauss : the confessor and the writer, 1873 -- Schopenhauer as educator, 1874 -- The free spirit, 1878-1880 -- Human, all too human : a book for free spirits, (...)
     
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  38. Servais Pinckaers (forthcoming). Conscience and the Christian Tradition.” Translated by Mary Thomas Noble, OP In The Pinckaers Reader, 321-341. Originally Published as “La Conception Chrétienne de la Conscience Morale.”. [REVIEW] Nova Et Vetera.score: 24.0
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  39. D. R. Walhof (2003). The Accusations of Conscience and the Christian Polity in John Calvin's Political Thought. History of Political Thought 24 (3):397-414.score: 24.0
  40. William Lyons (2009). Conscience – an Essay in Moral Psychology. Philosophy 84 (4):477-494.score: 22.0
    The ultimate aim of this essay is to suggest that conscience is a very important part of human psychology and of our moral point of view, not something that can be dismissed as merely ‘a part of Christian theology’. The essay begins with discussions of what might be regarded as the two most influential functional models of conscience, the classical Christian account of conscience and the Freudian account of conscience. Then, using some insights from these models, (...)
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  41. Hayden Ramsay (2001). Conscience: Aquinas — with a Hint of Aristotle. Sophia 40 (2):15-29.score: 22.0
    The paper presents Aquinas’s account of conscience, and argues that key elements of this account are key elements too of Aristotle’s moral theory. The paper’s purpose is to encourage debate over conscience as not only a Stoic/Christian concept but one with deeper— and more widespread—roots in western ethical tradition.
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  42. Basil Mitchell (1980/2000). Morality, Religious and Secular: The Dilemma of the Traditional Conscience. Oxford University Press.score: 22.0
    This book analyzes the moral confusion of contemporary society, relating rival conceptions of morality with a wide variety of views about the nature and predicament of man. Mitchell argues that many secular thinkers possess a traditional "Christian" conscience which they find hard to defend in terms of an entirely secular world-view, but which is more in line with a Christian understanding of man.
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  43. M. Ojakangas (2010). Conscience, the Remnant and the Witness: Genealogical Remarks on Giorgio Agamben's Ethics. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (6):697-717.score: 22.0
    In Remnants of Auschwitz, Giorgio Agamben argues that every ethical doctrine that claims to be founded on the notions of responsibility and guilt, even if ‘interiorized and moved outside law’ in the form of moral conscience, is necessarily ‘insufficient and opaque’. Indeed, one of the basic intents of the book is to profane and to neutralize the notions of guilt and responsibility as the paradigms of ethical thought, and to remove the idea of conscience from the sphere of (...)
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  44. Paul Strohm (2011). Conscience: A Very Short Introduction. OUP Oxford.score: 22.0
    Where does our conscience come from? How reliable is it? -/- In the West conscience has been relied upon for two thousand years as a judgement that distinguishes right from wrong. It has effortlessly moved through every period division and timeline between the ancient, medieval, and modern. The Romans identified it, the early Christians appropriated it, and Reformation Protestants and loyal Catholics relied upon its advice and admonition. Today it is embraced with equal conviction by non-religious and religious (...)
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  45. Rocco De Nuntis (2007). E la Coscienza?: Considerazioni Scientifiche, Filosofiche E Politiche Sul Tempo a Venire. Pagine.score: 20.0
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  46. Donovan Miyasaki (2010). Nietzsche Contra Freud on Bad Conscience. Nietzsche-Studien 39 (1).score: 18.0
    While much has been made of the similarities between the work of Nietzsche and Freud, insufficient attention has been paid to their differences. Even where they have been noted, the degree of these differences, which sometimes approaches direct opposition, has often been underestimated. In the following essay, I will suggest that on the topic of conscience Nietzsche and Freud have radically opposed views, with profoundly different moral consequences. Despite superficial similarities, Nietzsche’s conception of conscience is opposed to that (...)
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  47. Jeffrey White, Conscience: The Mechanism of Morality.score: 18.0
    Conscience is oft-referred to yet not understood. This text develops a theory of cognition around a model of conscience, the ACTWith model. It represents a synthesis of results from contemporary neuroscience with traditional philosophy, building from Jamesian insights into the emergence of the self to narrative identity, all the while motivated by a single mechanism as represented in the ACTWith model. Emphasis is placed on clarifying historical expressions and demonstrations of conscience - Socrates, Heidegger, Kant, M.L. King (...)
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  48. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2008). What is Conscience and Why is Respect for It so Important? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):135-149.score: 18.0
    The literature on conscience in medicine has paid little attention to what is meant by the word ‘conscience.’ This article distinguishes between retrospective and prospective conscience, distinguishes synderesis from conscience, and argues against intuitionist views of conscience. Conscience is defined as having two interrelated parts: (1) a commitment to morality itself; to acting and choosing morally according to the best of one’s ability, and (2) the activity of judging that an act one has done (...)
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  49. Brian Besong (2014). The Prudent Conscience View. International Philosophical Quarterly 54 (2):127-141.score: 18.0
    Moral intuitionism, which claims that some moral seemings are justification-conferring, has become an increasingly popular account in moral epistemology. Defenses of the position have largely focused on the standard account, according to which the justification-conferring power of a moral seeming is determined by its phenomenal credentials alone. Unfortunately, the standard account is a less plausible version of moral intuitionism because it does not take etiology seriously. In this paper, I provide an outline and defense of a non-standard account of moral (...)
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  50. Y. Michael Barilan & Margherita Brusa (2011). Triangular Reflective Equilibrium: A Conscience-Based Method for Bioethical Deliberation. Bioethics 25 (6):304-319.score: 18.0
    Following a discussion of some historical roots of conscience, we offer a systematized version of reflective equilibrium. Aiming at a comprehensive methodology for bioethical deliberation, we develop an expanded variant of reflective equilibrium, which we call ‘triangular reflective equilibrium’ and which incorporates insights from hermeneutics, critical theory and narrative ethics.We focus on a few distinctions, mainly between methods of justification in ethics and the social practice of bioethical deliberation, between coherence in ethical reasoning, personal integrity and consensus formation, and (...)
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