Search results for 'Consciousness History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. N. Humphrey (1992/1999). A History of the Mind: Evolution and the Birth of Consciousness. Simon and Schuster.score: 138.0
    This book is a tour-de-force on how human consciousness may have evolved. From the "phantom pain" experienced by people who have lost their limbs to the uncanny faculty of "blindsight," Humphrey argues that raw sensations are central to all conscious states and that consciousness must have evolved, just like all other mental faculties, over time from our ancestorsodily responses to pain and pleasure. '.
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  2. Gary Lachman (2003). A Secret History of Consciousness. Lindisfarne Books.score: 138.0
    Part one: the search for cosmic consciousness -- R.M. Bucke and the future of humanity -- William James and the anesthetic revelation -- Henri Bergson and the Elan Vital -- The superman -- A.R. Orage and the new age -- Ouspensky's fourth dimension -- Part two: esoteric evolution -- The bishop and the bulldog -- Enter the madame -- Dr. Steiner, I presume? -- From Goethean science to the wisdom of the human being -- Cosmic evolution -- Hypnagogia -- (...)
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  3. Guven Guzeldere (1995). Consciousness: What It is, How to Study It, What to Learn From its History. Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (1):30-51.score: 138.0
  4. D. Lynn Holt (1999). Metaphor, History, Consciousness: From Locke to Dennett. Philosophical Forum 30 (3):187-200.score: 132.0
  5. Marc J. Seifer (2011). Where Does Mind End?: A Radical History of Consciousness and the Awakened Self. Park Street Press.score: 132.0
     
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  6. Maxine Sheets-Johnstone (1998). Consciousness: A Natural History. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (3):260-94.score: 126.0
  7. Paul M. Livingston (2002). Experience and Structure: Philosophical History and the Problem of Consciousness. Journal Of Consciousness Studies 9 (3):15-33.score: 126.0
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  8. David L. Tresan (2004). This New Science of Ours: A More or Less Systematic History of Consciousness and Transcendence Part I. Journal of Analytical Psychology 49 (2):193-216.score: 120.0
     
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  9. Ilya B. Farber (2005). How a Neural Correlate Can Function as an Explanation of Consciousness: Evidence From the History of Science Regarding the Likely Explanatory Value of the NCC Approach. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (4-5):77-95.score: 114.0
    A frequent criticism of the neuroscientific approach to consciousness is that its theories describe only 'correlates' or 'analogues' of consciousness, and so fail to address the nature of consciousness itself. Despite its apparent logical simplicity, this criticism in fact relies on some substantive assumptions about the nature and evolution of scientific explanations. In particular, it is usually assumed that, in expressing correlations, neural correlate of consciousness (NCC) theories must fail to capture the causal structure relating brain (...)
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  10. Stephan Blatti (2009). Consciousness: From Perception to Reflection in the History of Philosophy (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 463-464.score: 114.0
    This is a review of Sara Heinämaa, Vili Lähteenmäki, Pauliina Remes (ed.), Consciousness: From Perception to Reflection in the History of Philosophy (Dordrecht: Springer 2007).
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  11. Eva-Maria Engelen (2010). Husserl, History, and Consciousness. In David Hyder & Hans-Jörg Rheinberger (eds.), Science and the Life-World. Stanford University Press.score: 108.0
    The “Crisis” itself is an attempt of enlightenment by examining origins. Husserl knows three philosophical origins of evidence and justification: (1) consciousness; (2) the life-world; (3) european philosophy and the history of the sciences. There is a tension of historicity and ahistoricity in all of these origins. I will show in how far all three origins are under this tension. Because even concerning the notion of absolute consciousness one can show, that it is linked to historicity. The (...)
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  12. Neil C. Manson (2011). Why “Consciousness” Means What It Does. Metaphilosophy 42 (1-2):98-117.score: 102.0
    Abstract: “Consciousness” seems to be a polysemic, ambiguous, term. Because of this, theorists have sought to distinguish the different kinds of phenomena that “consciousness” denotes, leading to a proliferation of terms for different kinds of consciousness. However, some philosophers—univocalists about consciousness—argue that “consciousness” is not polysemic or ambiguous. By drawing upon the history of philosophy and psychology, and some resources from semantic theory, univocalism about consciousness is shown to be implausible. This finding is (...)
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  13. Neil Campbell Manson (2000). 'A Tumbling-Ground for Whimsies'? The History and Contemporary Role of the Conscious/Unconscious Contrast. In Tim Crane & Sarah A. Patterson (eds.), History of the Mind-Body Problem. New York: Routledge.score: 102.0
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  14. D. C. Hoy (1991). A History of Consciousness : From Kant and Hegel to Derrida and Foucault. History of the Human Sciences 4 (2):261-281.score: 102.0
    Would a history of the human sciences seem strange if it featured a chapter on the history of consciousness? An argument for including such a chapter could point out that consciousness is often thought to be essential to what it is to be human. Yet the discipline that makes this.
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  15. Alain Morin, History of Exposure to Self-Focusing Stimuli As a Developmental Antecedent of Self-Consciousness.score: 96.0
    Szmimary.—The present report investigated the question of how individual differences in self-consciousness devdop. Rimé and LeBon proposed that high self-consciousness follows a history of frequent exposure to selffocusing stimuli, i.e., mirrors, audiences, audio and video devices, and cameras. To explore this hypothesis private and public self-consciousness and past exposure to self-focusing stimuli were assessed in 438 subjects. Analysis indicated that history of frequent exposure to self-focusing stimuli is significantly but weakly related to high private self- (...) in men and to high public self-consciousness in women. This supports previous observations suggesting that the routes to the development of selfconsciousness seem to differ for the two sexes. (shrink)
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  16. Alan M. Olson (2000). Epochal Consciousness and the Philosophy of History. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2000:159-171.score: 96.0
    Does the philosophy of history have a future? In 1949 Karl Jaspers, echoing Hegel, still identified history as the “great question” in philosophy; but in 1966 Karl Löwith observed that the philosophy of history had been reduced to little more than “epochal consciousness.” During the 1970s analytical philosophers endorsed the critical-speculative distinction of C. D. Broad and the question of universal history was effectively bracketed. Post-structuralists and feminists during the 70s and 80s endorsed the observation (...)
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  17. Paul M. Livingston (2004). Philosophical History and the Problem of Consciousness. Cambridge University Press.score: 90.0
    The problem of explaining consciousness today depends on the meaning of language: the ordinary language of consciousness in which we define and express our sensations, thoughts, dreams and memories. Paul Livingston argues that this contemporary problem arises from a quest that developed over the twentieth century, and that historical analysis provides new resources for understanding and resolving it. Accordingly, Livingston traces the application of characteristic practices of analytic philosophy to problems about the relationship of experience to linguistic meaning.
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  18. Christian Emden (2005). Nietzsche on Language, Consciousness, and the Body. University of Illinois Press.score: 90.0
    The irreducibility of language : the history of rhetoric in the age of typewriters -- The failures of empiricism : language, science, and the philosophical tradition -- What is a trope? : the discourse of metaphor and the language of the body -- The nervous systems of modern consciousness : metaphor, physiology, and mind -- Interpretation and life : outlines of an anthropology of knowledge.
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  19. Erich Neumann (1954/1970). The Origins and History of Consciousness. [Princeton, N.J.]Princeton University Press.score: 90.0
    The first of Erich Neumann's works to be translated into English, this eloquent book draws on a full range of world mythology to show that individual consciousness undergoes the same archetypal stages of development as has human consciousness as a whole. Neumann, one of Jung's most creative students and a renowned practitioner of analytical psychology in his own right, shows how the stages begin and end with the symbol of the Uroboros, or tail-eating serpent. The intermediate stages are (...)
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  20. William G. Lycan, Representational Theories of Consciousness. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 84.0
    The idea of representation has been central in discussions of intentionality for many years. But only more recently has it begun playing a wider role in the philosophy of mind, particularly in theories of consciousness. Indeed, there are now multiple representational theories of consciousness, corresponding to different uses of the term "conscious," each attempting to explain the corresponding phenomenon in terms of representation. More cautiously, each theory attempts to explain its target phenomenon in terms of _intentionality_, and assumes (...)
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  21. Nigel J. T. Thomas (1998). Imagination, Eliminativism, and the Pre-History of Consciousness. Consciousness Research Abstracts 3.score: 84.0
    Classical and medieval writers had no term for consciousness in anything like the modern sense, and their philosophy seems not to have been troubled by the mind-body problem. Contemporary eliminativists find strong support in this fact for their claim that consciousness does not exist, or, at least, is not an appropriate scientific explanandum. They typically hold that contemporary conceptions of consciousness are artefacts of Descartes' (now outmoded) views about matter and his unrealistic craving for epistemological certainty. Essentially, (...)
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  22. Thomas Nigel (1998). Imagination, Eliminativism, and the Pre-History of Consciousness. Consciousness Research Abstracts 3.score: 84.0
    Classical and medieval writers had no term for consciousness in anything like the modern sense, and their philosophy seems not to have been troubled by the mind-body problem. Contemporary eliminativists find strong support in this fact for their claim that consciousness does not exist, or, at least, is not an appropriate scientific explanandum. They typically hold that contemporary conceptions of consciousness are artefacts of Descartes' (now outmoded) views about matter and his unrealistic craving for epistemological certainty. Essentially, (...)
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  23. William Irwin Thompson (1998). Coming Into Being: Artifacts and Texts in the Evolution of Consciousness. St. Martin's Griffin.score: 84.0
    In his best-selling The Time Falling Bodies Take to Light , William Irwin Thompson intrigued readers with his thoughts on mythology and sexuality. In his newest book, Coming Into Being: Artifacts and Texts in the Evolution of Consciousness , he takes the reader on a journey through the evolution of consciousness from the preverbal communications of early stone carvings, to the writings of Marcel Proust, around the monumental wrappings of Christo and up to the rebirth of interest in (...)
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  24. Hilary Rose (1999). Changing Constructions of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (11-12):251-258.score: 84.0
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  25. Ted A. Warfield (1999). Against Representational Theories of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (1):66-69.score: 84.0
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  26. Stanley J. Scott (1991). Frontiers of Consciousness: Interdisciplinary Studies in American Philosophy and Poetry. Fordham University Press.score: 84.0
    Frontiers of Consciousness is a study of the problem of consciousness in a historic period of revolutionary change, and an authentic example of “interdisciplinary studies.” The book contains a wealth of insight into the conceptual interrelationships between the work of the American philosophers who have been called the Builders (William James, Josiah Royce, Charles Peirce, and John Dewey) and the work of three great modernist poets (T. S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, and William Carlos Williams).
     
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  27. Peter-Joachim Opitz, Gregor Sebba & Eric Voegelin (eds.) (1981). The Philosophy of Order: Essays on History, Consciousness, and Politics. Klett-Cotta.score: 84.0
     
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  28. William E. Seager (2007). A Brief History of the Philosophical Problem of Consciousness. In P. D. Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge University Press. 9--33.score: 78.0
  29. Holly Andersen & Rick Grush (2009). A Brief History of Time-Consciousness: Historical Precursors to James and Husserl. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (2):277-307.score: 78.0
    William James’ Principles of Psychology, in which he made famous the ‘specious present’ doctrine of temporal experience, and Edmund Husserl’s Zur Phänomenologie des inneren Zeitbewusstseins, were giant strides in the philosophical investigation of the temporality of experience. However, an important set of precursors to these works has not been adequately investigated. In this article, we undertake this investigation. Beginning with Reid’s essay ‘Memory’ in Essays on the Intellectual Powers of Man, we trace out a line of development of ideas about (...)
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  30. Manfred Frank (2004). Fragments of a History of the Theory of Self-Consciousness From Kant to Kierkegaard. Critical Horizons 5 (1):53-136.score: 78.0
    In the development of modern philosophy self-consciousness was not generally or unanimously given important consideration. This was because philosophers such as Descartes, Kant and Fichte thought it served as the highest principle from which we can 'deduce' all propositions that rightly claimed validity. However, the Romantics thought that the consideration of self-consciousness was of the highest importance even when any claim to foundationalism was abandoned. In this respect, Hölderlin and his circle, as well as Novalis and Schleiermacher, thought (...)
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  31. Abraham Akkerman (2006). Femininity and Masculinity in City-Form: Philosophical Urbanism as a History of Consciousness. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):229 - 256.score: 78.0
    Mutual feedback between human-made environments and facets of thought throughout history has yielded two myths: the Garden and the Citadel. Both myths correspond to Jung’s feminine and masculine collective subconscious, as well as to Nietzsche’s premise of Apollonian and Dionysian impulses in art. Nietzsche’s premise suggests, furthermore, that the feminine myth of the Garden is time-bound whereas the masculine myth of the Citadel, or the Ideal City, constitutes a spatial deportment. Throughout history the two myths have continually molded (...)
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  32. Brian Jonathan Garrett (2006). What the History of Vitalism Teaches Us About Consciousness and the "Hard Problem". Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (3):576 - 588.score: 78.0
    Daniel Dennett has claimed that if Chalmers' argument for the irreducibility of consciousness were to succeed, an analogous argument would establish the truth of Vitalism. Chalmers denies that there is such an analogy. I argue that the analogy does have merit and that skepticism is called for.
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  33. Holly K. Andersen Rick Grush (2009). A Brief History of Time-Consciousness: Historical Precursors to James and Husserl. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (2):pp. 277-307.score: 78.0
    William James' Principles of Psychology , in which he made famous the "specious present" doctrine of temporal experience, and Edmund Husserl's Zur Phänomenologie des inneren Zeitbewusstseins were giant strides in the philosophical investigation of the temporality of experience. However, an important set of precursors to these works has not been adequately investigated. In this article, we undertake this investigation. Beginning with Reid's essay "Memory" in Essays on the Intellectual Powers of Man , we trace out a line of development of (...)
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  34. T. Hamanaka (1997). The Concept of Consciousness in the History of Neuropsychiatry. History of Psychiatry 8:361-373.score: 78.0
  35. Robert Piercey (2011). Historical Consciousness and the Identity of Philosophy. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (3-4):411-434.score: 78.0
    It is now widely accepted that philosophers should be historically self-conscious. But what does this mean in practice? How does historical consciousness change the way we philosophize? To answer this question, I examine two philosophers who put historical consciousness at the heart of their projects: Richard Rorty and Paul Ricoeur. Rorty and Ricoeur both argue that historical consciousness leads us to see philosophy as fragmented. It leads us to view our thinking from multiple perspectives at once, perspectives (...)
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  36. Avner Cohen (1984). Descartes, Consciousness and Depersonalization: Viewing the History of Philosophy From a Strausian Perspective. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (1):7-28.score: 78.0
    This paper develops particular Strausian-like themes on the formation and structure of the Cartesian problematic. Particularly, my interest is to link the Cartesian ‘invention’ of consciousness (or ‘the mental’) in the philosophy of mind with the issues of representation and ‘the problem of the external world’ in epistemology. The Cartesian novelty becomes clear by comparing Cartesian scepticism with Greek classical scepticism. I end with some speculative clinical (i.e., psychiatric) suggestions on possible roots of the Cartesian invention. Keywords: Consciousness, (...)
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  37. Thomas Langan (1983). The Philosophy of Order: Essays on History, Consciousness and Politics. Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (3):424-425.score: 78.0
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  38. Ryan Hickerson (2007). The History of Intentionality: Theories of Consciousness From Brentano to Husserl. Continuum.score: 78.0
    Franz Brentano's claim to fame is the reintroduction of intentionality to the modern philosophy of mind. Hickerson's book offers new interpretations of a central philosophical concept employed in the Brentano School, arguing against the now-standard misreading of Brentano as Immanentist. The History of Intentionality is a continuing history and will be valuable to present-day specialists and students in phenomenology and the philosophy of mind.
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  39. István Mészáros (2008). Dialectical Transformations : Teleology, History and Social Consciousness. In Bertell Ollman & Tony Smith (eds.), Dialectics for the New Century. Palgrave Macmillan. 417 - 433.score: 78.0
    In Marxism, the material base of society is responsible for a number of structural restraints on the appearance, functioning, and evolution of the superstructure. At the same time, the superstructure, too, and especially ideology, exercises considerable influence on developments in the base, and in certain conditions can prove decisive in transforming the relations that constitute the base. While history is radically open ended and, therefore, nothing is absolutely certain, knowledge of such conditions is a necessary first step toward a (...)
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  40. Mark D. Morelli (1995). The Polymorphism of Human Consciousness and the Prospects for a Lonerganian History of Philosophy. International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (4):379-402.score: 78.0
    Lonergan's account of human consciousness as polymorphic self-presence differs significantly from both the variety of contemporary reductionistic accounts and phenomenological treatments still influenced strongly by Cartesian suppositions and/or Kantian restrictions. It is argued that Lonergan's account grounds not only a critical meta-philosophy, but also provides a heuristic structure for a nuanced genetic account of philosophic differences. In this regard, Lonergan's account is claimed to be an adequate grounding for a thorough contemporary response to the Hegelian requirement that philosophers account (...)
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  41. Petteri Pietikainen (2003). Consciousness Historicized: Philosophical History and the Nature of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 16 (2):151-158.score: 78.0
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  42. Jaroslav Krejci (1989). Ruptures and Traumas in Central European Consciousness: Czech History as a Test Case. History of European Ideas 11 (1-6):365-376.score: 78.0
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  43. Georg Lukács (1972). History and Class Consciousness: Studies in Marxist Dialectics. The Mit Press.score: 78.0
    A series of essays treating, among other topics, the definition of orthodox Marxism, the question of legality and illegality, Rosa Luxemburg as a Marxist, the changing function of Historic Marxism, class consciousness, and the ...
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  44. Ullin T. Place (1956). Is Consciousness a Brain Process? British Journal of Psychology 47 (1):44-50.score: 78.0
     
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  45. M. M. Agrawal (1991). Consciousness and the Integrated Being: Sartre and Krishnamurti. Indian Institute of Advanced Study and National Pub. House, New Delhi.score: 78.0
  46. Andrew O. Fort (1990). The Self and its States: A States of Consciousness Doctrine in Advaita Vedanta. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.score: 78.0
     
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  47. Christopher D. Frith & Geraint Rees (2007). A Brief History of the Scientific Approach to the Study of Consciousness. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell.score: 78.0
     
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  48. Inger Gilbert (1994). Literature (Duration) and History (Chronology): Consumption or Consciousness? History of European Ideas 19 (4-6):883-888.score: 78.0
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  49. Wulf Kansteiner (2007). Alternate Worlds and Invented Communities : History and Historical Consciousness in the Age of Interactive Media. In Keith Jenkins, Sue Morgan & Alun Munslow (eds.), Manifestos for History. Routledge.score: 78.0
     
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  50. Mark Kulstad (1991). Leibniz on Apperception, Consciousness, and Reflection. Philosophia.score: 78.0
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