Search results for 'Consciousness in animals' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Melanie Boly, Anil K. Seth, Melanie Wilke, Paul Ingmundson, Bernard Baars, Steven Laureys, David Edelman & Naotsugu Tsuchiya (2013). Consciousness in Humans and Non-Human Animals: Recent Advances and Future Directions. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 143.0
    This joint article reflects the authors’ personal views regarding noteworthy advances in the neuroscience of consciousness in the last ten years, and suggests what we feel may be promising future directions. It is based on a small conference at the Samoset Resort in Rockport, Maine, USA, in July of 2012, organized by the Mind Science Foundation of San Antonio, Texas. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of subjectivity in humans and other animals, including empirical, applied, technical (...)
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  2. Derek A. Denton (1993/1994). The Pinnacle of Life: Consciousness and Self-Awareness in Humans and Animals. Harpersanfrancisco.score: 141.0
     
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  3. Marc Bekoff (2003). Consciousness and Self in Animals: Some Reflections. Zygon 38 (2):229-245.score: 116.0
    In this essay I argue that many nonhuman animal beings are conscious and have some sense of self. Rather than ask whether they are conscious, I adopt an evolutionary perspective and ask why consciousness and a sense of self evolved---what are they good for? Comparative studies of animal cognition, ethological investigations that explore what it is like to be a certain animal, are useful for answering this question. Charles Darwin argued that the differences in cognitive abilities and emotions among (...)
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  4. Darryl Macer (1997). Animal Consciousness and Ethics in Asia and the Pacific. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (3):249-267.score: 104.0
    The interactions between humans, animals and the environment have shaped human values and ethics, not only the genes that we are made of. The animal rights movement challenges human beings to reconsider interactions between humans and other animals, and maybe connected to the environmental movement that begs us to recognize the fact that there are symbiotic relationships between humans and all other organisms. The first part of this paper looks at types of bioethics, the implications of autonomy and (...)
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  5. Tim Appleton (1976). Consciousness in Animals. Zygon 11 (December):337-345.score: 102.0
  6. R. H. Bradshaw (1998). Consciousness in Nonhuman Animals: Adopting the Precautionary Principle. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (1):108-14.score: 102.0
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  7. E. M. Macphail (1998). The Evolution of Consciousness. Oxford University Press.score: 99.0
    Are non-human animals conscious? When do babies begin to feel pain? What function is served by consciousness? What evidence could resolve these issues? In The Evolution of Consciousness, psychologist Euan Macphail tackles these questions and more by exploring such topics as: animal cognition; unconscious learning and perception in humans; infantile amnesia; theory of mind in primates; and the nature of pleasure and pain. Experimental results are placed in theoretical context by tracing the development of concepts of (...) in animals and humans. Written in an accessible style, this book will be of interest to students and professionals in psychology, philosophy, and linguistics, as well as all those interested in the nature of consciousness. (shrink)
     
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  8. Jaak Panksepp (2005). Affective Consciousness: Core Emotional Feelings in Animals and Humans. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):30-80.score: 96.0
  9. R. V. Rial [ (2008). The Evolution of Consciousness in Animals. In Hans Liljenström & Peter Århem (eds.), Consciousness Transitions: Phylogenetic, Ontogenetic, and Physiological Aspects. Elsevier.score: 93.0
  10. Hugh M. Roberts (1968). Consciousness in Animals and Automata. Psychological Reports 22:1226-28.score: 90.0
  11. Ron Chrisley (2006). IgorAleksanderThe World in My Mind, My Mind in the World: Key Mechanisms of Consciousness in People, Animals and Machines2005Imprint Academic1 845 40021 6£ 17.95 (UK)/$34.90 (US)(196 Pp.). [REVIEW] Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):5-6.score: 90.0
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  12. Rocco J. Gennaro (2009). Animals, Consciousness, and I-Thoughts. In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press. 184--200.score: 88.7
    I argue that recent developments in animal cognition support the conclusion that HOT theory is consistent with animal consciousness. There seems to be growing evidence that many animals are indeed capable of having I-thoughts, including episodic memory, as well as have the ability to understand the mental states of others.
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  13. Joseph E. Capizzi (2008). Consciousness in Human and Nonhuman Animals. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 8 (1):33-42.score: 87.0
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  14. Alan R. Dennis, Julie A. Rennecker & Sean Hansen (forthcoming). Consciousness and Self in Animals: Some Reflections. Zygon.score: 87.0
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  15. Human Nature (2005). Appearance in This List Neither Guarantees nor Precludes a Future Review of the Book. Aleksander, Igor, The World in My Mind, My Mind in the World: Key Mechanisms of Consciousness in People, Animals and Machines, Charlottesville, VA and Exeter, UK: Imprint Academic, 2005, Pp. 196,£ 17.95, $34.90. Aparece, Pederito A., Teaching, Learning and Community: An Examination of Wittgen. [REVIEW] Mind 114:455.score: 87.0
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  16. Wenyi Zhang (2014). Bearing the Decline of Animal Sacrifice: Enhanced State of Consciousness, Illness, Taboos, and the Government in Southwest China. Anthropology of Consciousness 25 (1):116-140.score: 84.3
    In this study, I analyze how economic development projects and the ethnic tourism project in Southwest China have contributed to the failure of the ethnic Kachin villagers to observe taboos involved in shamanic healing rituals. Such a failure, initially as a local response to politico-economic processes in Southwest China, exacerbates the increasingly poor health status of Kachin shamans in the local community. Taboos thus become an active site where the local decline of animal sacrifice intersects with regional processes of economic (...)
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  17. Nicholas Boltuc & Peter Boltuc (2007). Replication of the Hard Problem of Consciousness in AI and Bio-AI: An Early Conceptual Framework. In Anthony Chella & Ricardo Manzotti (eds.), AI and Consciousness: Theoretical Foundations and Current Approaches. AAAI Press, Merlo Park, CA.score: 81.0
    We should eventually understand how exactly first person phenomenal consciousness is generated. When we do, we should be able to enginner one for robots. This is the engineering thesis in machine consciousness.
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  18. Abraham Rudnick (2007). Other-Consciousness and the Use of Animals as Illustrated in Medical Experiments. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):202–208.score: 81.0
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  19. Tristan A. Bekinschtein, Moos Peeters, Diego Shalom & Mariano Sigman (2011). Sea Slugs, Subliminal Pictures, and Vegetative State Patients: Boundaries of Consciousness in Classical Conditioning. Frontiers in Psychology 2:337-337.score: 80.0
    Classical (trace) conditioning is a specific variant of associative learning in which a neutral stimulus leads to the subsequent prediction of an emotionally charged or noxious stimulus after a temporal gap. When conditioning is concurrent with a distraction task, only participants who can report the relationship (the contingency) between stimuli explicitly show associative learning. This suggests that consciousness is a prerequisite for trace conditioning. We review and question three main controversies concerning this view. Firstly, virtually all animals, even (...)
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  20. Gregory M. Nixon (2010). Myth and Mind: The Origin of Consciousness in the Discovery of the Sacred. Journal of Consciousness Exploration and Research 1 (3):289-337.score: 78.0
    By accepting that the formal structure of human language is the key to understanding the uniquity of human culture and consciousness and by further accepting the late appearance of such language amongst the Cro-Magnon, I am free to focus on the causes that led to such an unprecedented threshold crossing. In the complex of causes that led to human being, I look to scholarship in linguistics, mythology, anthropology, paleontology, and to creation myths themselves for an answer. I conclude that (...)
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  21. Stephen Thomas Newmyer (2006). Animals, Rights, and Reason in Plutarch and Modern Ethics. Routledge.score: 76.0
    Plutarch is virtually unique in surviving classical authors in arguing that animals are rational and sentient, and in concluding that human beings must take notice of their interests. Stephen Newmyer explores Plutarch's three animal-related treatises, as well as passages from his other ethical treatises, which argue that non-human animals are rational and therefore deserve to fall within the sphere of human moral concern. Newmyer shows that some of the arguments Plutarch raises strikingly foreshadow those found in the works (...)
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  22. Anthony J. Marcel & E. Bisiach (eds.) (1988). Consciousness in Contemporary Science. Oxford University Press.score: 76.0
    The significance of consciousness in modern science is discussed by leading authorities from a variety of disciplines. Presenting a wide-ranging survey of current thinking on this important topic, the contributors address such issues as the status of different aspects of consciousness; the criteria for using the concept of consciousness and identifying instances of it; the basis of consciousness in functional brain organization; the relationship between different levels of theoretical discourse; and the functions of consciousness.
     
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  23. Kirsten Brukamp (2013). Right (to a) Diagnosis? Establishing Correct Diagnoses in Chronic Disorders of Consciousness. Neuroethics 6 (1):5-11.score: 74.0
    Chronic disorders of consciousness, particularly the vegetative and the minimally conscious states, pose serious diagnostic challenges to neurologists and clinical psychologists. A look at the concept of “diagnosis” in medicine reveals its social construction: While medical categorizations are intended to describe facts in the real world, they are nevertheless dependent on conventions and agreements between experts and practitioners. For chronic disorders of consciousness in particular, the terminology has proven problematic and controversial over the years. Novel research utilizing functional (...)
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  24. Bjorn H. Merker (2005). The Liabilities of Mobility: A Selection Pressure for the Transition to Consciousness in Animal Evolution. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):89-114.score: 73.0
  25. G. Greenberg & E. Tobach (eds.) (1987). Cognition, Language, and Consciousness: Integrative Levels. Lawrence Erlbaum.score: 73.0
    "Each animal in its own psychological setting . . / 1 Gerard Piel Scientific American, New York TC Schneirla was more interested in questions than in ...
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  26. Mary Sanders Pollock & Catherine Rainwater (eds.) (2005). Figuring Animals: Essays on Animal Images in Art, Literature, Philosophy, and Popular Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 72.0
    Figuring Animals is a collection of fifteen essays concerning the representation of animals in literature, the visual arts, philosophy, and cultural practice. At the turn of the new century, it is helpful to reconsider our inherited understandings of the species, some of which are still useful to us. It is also important to look ahead to new understandings and new dialogue, which may contribute to the survival of us all. The contributors to this volume participate in this dialogue (...)
     
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  27. Ron Kupers, Pietro Pietrini, Emiliano Ricciardi & Maurice Ptito (2011). The Nature of Consciousness in the Visually Deprived Brain. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 70.0
    Vision plays a central role in how we represent and interact with the world around us. The primacy of vision is structurally imbedded in cortical organization as about one third of the cortical surface in primates is involved in visual processes. Consequently, the loss of vision, either at birth or later in life, profoundly affects brain organization and the way the world is perceived and acted upon. In this paper, we address a number of issues on the nature of (...) in people deprived of vision. Do brains from sighted and blind individuals differ, and how? How does the brain of someone who has never had any visual perception form an image of the external world? What is the subjective correlate of activity in the visual cortex of a subject who has never seen in life? More in general, what can we learn about the functional development of the human brain in physiological conditions by studying blindness? We discuss findings from animal research as well from recent psychophysical and functional brain imaging studies in sighted and blind individuals that shed some new light on the answers to these questions. (shrink)
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  28. Jacky Turner & Joyce D'Silva (eds.) (2006). Animals, Ethics, and Trade: The Challenge of Animal Sentience. Earthscan.score: 70.0
    can be adapted and adopted by developing countries. IFC sees this as being an area where we may be able to benchmark and promote positive change. ● The force of global trade initiatives also influences animal welfare.
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  29. Anil K. Seth, Bernard J. Baars & D. B. Edelman (2005). Criteria for Consciousness in Humans and Other Mammals. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):119-39.score: 69.0
    The standard behavioral index for human consciousness is the ability to report events with accuracy. While this method is routinely used for scientific and medical applications in humans, it is not easy to generalize to other species. Brain evidence may lend itself more easily to comparative testing. Human consciousness involves widespread, relatively fast low-amplitude interactions in the thalamocortical core of the brain, driven by current tasks and conditions. These features have also been found in other mammals, which suggests (...)
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  30. Colin McLear (2011). Kant on Animal Consciousness. Philosophers' Imprint 11 (15).score: 69.0
    Kant is often considered to have argued that perceptual awareness of objects in one's environment depends on the subject's possession of conceptual capacities. This conceptualist interpretation raises an immediate problem concerning the nature of perceptual awareness in non-rational, non-concept using animals. In this paper I argue that Kant’s claims concerning animal representation and consciousness do not foreclose the possibility of attributing to animals the capacity for objective perceptual consciousness, and that a non-conceptualist interpretation of Kant’s position (...)
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  31. Lawrence H. Davis (1989). Self-Consciousness in Chimps and Pigeons. Philosophical Psychology 2 (3):249-59.score: 66.0
    Chimpanzee behaviour with mirrors makes it plausible that they can recognise themselves as themselves in mirrors, and so have a 'self-concept'. I defend this claim, and argue that roughly similar behaviour in pigeons, as reported, does not in fact make it equally plausible that they also have this mental capacity. But for all that it is genuine, chimpanzee self-consciousness may differ significantly from ours. I describe one possibility I believe consistent with the data, even if not very plausible: that (...)
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  32. Preben Bertelsen (1999). Development of Phenomenological Consciousness in Early Childhood. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):195-216.score: 66.0
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  33. Susan L. Hurley, Consciousness in Action: Clarifications.score: 65.0
    Philosophy of neuroscience may seem an odd thing to do. What can a philosopher add to what neuroscience itself has to say, other than at some very abstract level, far removed from empirical details and the interests of scientists? At some point you take a deep breath, acknowledge the methodological questions, and just go ahead, spurred on by the sheer philosophical interest and excitement abroad in the neurosciences today. So it is very gratifying to a philosopher of neuroscience for such (...)
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  34. Michel Weber & Anderson Weekes (eds.) (2010). Process Approaches to Consciousness in Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind. State University of New York Press.score: 65.0
    This collection opens a dialogue between process philosophy and contemporary consciousness studies. Approaching consciousness from diverse disciplinary perspectives—philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, neuropathology, psychotherapy, biology, animal ethology, and physics—the contributors offer empirical and philosophical support for a model of consciousness inspired by the process philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead (1861–1947). Whitehead’s model is developed in ways he could not have anticipated to show how it can advance current debates beyond well-known sticking points. This has trenchant consequences for epistemology and (...)
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  35. Susan J. Blackmore (2003). Consciousness in Meme Machines. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (4):19-30.score: 65.0
    Setting aside the problems of recognising consciousness in a machine, this article considers what would be needed for a machine to have human-like conscious- ness. Human-like consciousness is an illusion; that is, it exists but is not what it appears to be. The illusion that we are a conscious self having a stream of experi- ences is constructed when memes compete for replication by human hosts. Some memes survive by being promoted as personal beliefs, desires, opinions and pos- (...)
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  36. David Gamez (2012). Empirically Grounded Claims About Consciousness in Computers. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (02):421-438.score: 65.0
    Research is starting to identify correlations between consciousness and some of the spatiotemporal patterns in the physical brain. For theoretical and practical reasons, the results of experiments on the correlates of consciousness have ambiguous interpretations. At any point in time a number of hypotheses co-exist about and the correlates of consciousness in the brain, which are all compatible with the current experimental results. This paper argues that consciousness should be attributed to any system that exhibits spatiotemporal (...)
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  37. Bernhard Hommel (2013). Dancing in the Dark: No Role for Consciousness in Action Control. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 65.0
    Dancing in the dark: no role for consciousness in action control.
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  38. Thomas Suddendorf & Janie Busby (2003). Mental Time Travel in Animals? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (9):391-396.score: 65.0
    Are humans alone in their ability to reminisce about the past and imagine the future? Recent evidence suggests that food-storing birds (scrub jays) have access to information about what they have stored where and when. This has raised the possibility of mental time travel (MTT) in animals and sparked similar research with other species. Here we caution that such data do not provide convincing evidence for MTT. Examination of characteristics of human MTT (e.g. non-verbal declaration, generativity, developmental prerequisites) points (...)
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  39. Jeroen van Boxtel Naotsugu Tsuchiya (2013). Introduction to Research Topic: Attention and Consciousness in Different Senses. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 65.0
    Introduction to research topic: attention and consciousness in different senses.
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  40. K. Ramakrishna Rao (2005). Perception, Cognition, and Consciousness in Classical Hindu Psychology. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (3):3-30.score: 63.0
    Perception is sensory awareness. Cognition is reflective awareness. Consciousness is awareness-as-such. In Indian psychology, as represented by Samkhya-Yoga and Advaita Vedanta systems, consciousness and mind are fundamentally different. Reality is the composite of being (sat), knowing (cit) and feeling (ananda). Consciousness is the knowledge side of the universe. It is the ground condition of all awareness. Consciousness is not a part or aspect of the mind. Mind is physical and consciousness is not. Consciousness does (...)
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  41. Donald R. Griffin (2001). Animal Minds: Beyond Cognition to Consciousness. University of Chicago Press.score: 63.0
    Finally, in four chapters greatly expanded for this edition, Griffin considers the latest scientific research on animal consciousness, pro and con, and...
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  42. Farid Masrour (forthcoming). Unity of Consciousness: In Defense of a Leibnizian View. In Christopher Hill David Bennett (ed.), Sensory Integration and the Unity of Consciousness. MIT Press.score: 63.0
    It is common to hold that our conscious experiences at a single moment are often unified. But when consciousness is unified, what are the fundamental facts in virtue of which it is unified? On some accounts of the unity of consciousness, the most fundamental fact that grounds unity is a form of singularity or oneness. These accounts are similar to Newtonian views of space according to which the most fundamental fact that grounds relations of co-spatiality between various points (...)
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  43. K. Smilla Ebeling (2011). Sexing the Rotifer: Reading Nonhuman Animals' Sex and Reproduction in 19th-Century Biology. Society and Animals 19 (3):305-315.score: 63.0
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  44. Simone de La Tour & Kevin de La Tour (2011). Original Mind and Cosmic Consciousness in the Co-Creative Process. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (1):57-74.score: 63.0
    This article will investigate the issue of accessing benxin 本心 (original mind), subsequent operation from Self and, in that process, union with the greater universe or benti 本体 (original substance)—a state expressed in the West as cosmic consciousness. It is proposed that this allows one to participate as a partner in the creative process of one’s own life and the surrounding world. The equally important question of how to gain contact with original mind will also be addressed, as well (...)
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  45. Beth Seacord (2011). Animals, Phenomenal Consciousness, and Higher-Order Theories of Mind. Philo 14 (2):201-222.score: 63.0
    Some advocates of higher-order theories of consciousness believe that the correct theory of consciousness together with empirical facts about animal intelligence make it highly unlikely that animals are capable of having phenomenally conscious experiences. I will argue that even if the higher-order thought (HOT) theory of consciousness is correct, there is good evidence (taken from experiments in mind reading and metacognition, as well as considerations from neurophysiology and evolutionary biology) that at least some nonhuman animals (...)
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  46. Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). The Status of Consciousness in Nature. In Steven Miller (ed.), The Constitution of Consciousness, Volume 2. John Benjamins Publishing Company.score: 63.0
    The most central metaphysical question about phenomenal consciousness is that of what constitutes phenomenal consciousness, whereas the most central epistemic question about consciousness is that of whether science can eventually provide an explanation of phenomenal consciousness. Many philosophers have argued that science doesn't have the means to answer the question of what consciousness is (the explanatory gap) but that consciousness nonetheless is fully determined by the physical facts underlying it (no metaphysical gap). Others have (...)
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  47. Andrea Gaynor (2007). Animal Agendas: Conflict Over Productive Animals in Twentieth-Century Australian Cities. Society and Animals 15 (1):29-42.score: 63.0
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  48. Jon Mallatt Todd E. Feinberg (2013). The Evolutionary and Genetic Origins of Consciousness in the Cambrian Period Over 500 Million Years Ago. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 63.0
    Vertebrates evolved in the Cambrian Period before 520 million years ago, but we do not know when or how consciousness arose in the history of the vertebrate brain. Here we propose multiple levels of isomorphic or somatotopic neural representations as an objective marker for sensory consciousness. All extant vertebrates have these, so we deduce that consciousness extends back to the group’s origin. The first conscious sense may have been vision. Then vision, coupled with additional sensory systems derived (...)
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  49. Declan Smithies (2011). What is the Role of Consciousness in Demonstrative Thought? Journal of Philosophy 108 (1):5-34.score: 62.0
    Perception enables us to think demonstrative thoughts about the world around us, but what must perception be like in order to play this role? Does perception enable demonstrative thought only if it is conscious? This paper examines three accounts of the role of consciousness in demonstrative thought, which agree that consciousness is essential for demonstrative thought, but disagree about why it is. First, I consider and reject the accounts proposed by Gareth Evans in The Varieties of Reference and (...)
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  50. Blake H. Dournaee (2010). Comments on “The Replication of the Hard Problem of Consciousness in AI and Bio-AI”. Minds and Machines 20 (2):303-309.score: 62.0
    In their joint paper entitled The Replication of the Hard Problem of Consciousness in AI and BIO-AI (Boltuc et al. Replication of the hard problem of conscious in AI and Bio- AI: An early conceptual framework 2008), Nicholas and Piotr Boltuc suggest that machines could be equipped with phenomenal consciousness, which is subjective consciousness that satisfies Chalmer’s hard problem (We will abbreviate the hard problem of consciousness as H-consciousness ). The claim is that if we (...)
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