Search results for 'Consciousness physiology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  21
    Mark Germine (1997). The Physiology of Collective Consciousness. World Futures 48 (1):57-104.
    (1997). The physiology of collective consciousness. World Futures: Vol. 48, The Concept of Collective Consiousness: Research Perspectives, pp. 57-104.
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  2.  53
    Bruce Bridgeman (1986). Relations Between the Physiology of Attention and the Physiology of Consciousness. Psychological Research 48:259-266.
  3. Julian M. Davidson (1976). The Physiology of Meditation and Mystical States of Consciousness. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 19 (3):345-380.
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  4. Bernard J. Baars (1999). Attention Vs Consciousness in the Visual Brain: Differences in Conception, Phenomenology, Behavior, Neuroanatomy, and Physiology. Journal of General Psychology 126:224-33.
  5. Stephen Jones, Introduction to the Physiology of Ordinary Consciousness.
     
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  6. Elliot P. Frost (1912). Can Biology and Physiology Dispense with Consciousness? Philosophical Review 21:723.
     
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  7. Eliott P. Frost (1912). Discussion: Can Biology and Physiology Dispense with Consciousness? Psychological Review 19 (3):246-252.
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  8.  40
    J. K. O'Regan (2011). Why Red Doesn't Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    The catastrophe of the eye -- A new view of seeing -- Applying the new view of seeing -- The illusion of seeing everything -- Some contentious points -- Towards consciousness -- Types of consciousness -- Phenomenal consciousness, raw feel, and why they're hard -- Squeeze a sponge, drive a porsche : a sensorimotor account of feel -- Consciously experiencing a feel -- The sensorimotor approach to color -- Sensory substitution -- The localization of touch -- The (...)
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  9.  21
    Hans Liljenström & Peter Århem (eds.) (2008). Consciousness Transitions: Phylogenetic, Ontogenetic, and Physiological Aspects. Elsevier.
    It was not long ago when the consciousness was not considered a problem for science. However, this has now changed and the problem of consciousness is considered the greatest challenge to science. In the last decade, a great number of books and articles have been published in the field, but very few have focused on the how consciousness evolves and develops, and what characterizes the transitions between different conscious states, in animals and humans. This book addresses these (...)
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  10. Simeon Locke (2008). Consciousness, Self-Consciousness, and the Science of Being Human. Praeger.
    In the beginning: introduction -- This I believe: preview -- This they believe: other views -- Where it begins: anatomy and environment -- Where it began: evolution -- What is it?: consciousness -- There was the word: self-consciousness and language -- See here: attention -- Perhaps to dream: sleep -- x=2y: representation -- The dance of life: movement -- They all fall down: dissolution of function -- Been there, done that: experience -- Which have eyes and see not: (...)
     
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  11.  14
    Lawrence Weiskrantz & Martin Davies (eds.) (2008). Frontiers of Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    In recent years consciousness has become a significant area of study in the cognitive sciences. The Frontiers of Consciousness is a major interdisciplinary exploration of consciousness. The book stems from the Chichele lectures held at All Souls College in Oxford, and features contributions from a 'who's who' of authorities from both philosophy and psychology. The result is a truly interdisciplinary volume, which tackles some of the biggest and most impenetrable problems in consciousness. The book includes chapters (...)
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  12. Rex Welshon (2010). Philosophy, Neuroscience, and Consciousness. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Philosophy and consciousness. Consciousness and conscious properties ; Identity, supervenience, reduction and emergence ; Reductive and non-reductive physicalisms ; Representationalist theories of conscious properties -- Neuroscience and consciousness. Cortical evolution and modularity ; Arousal, perception and effect ; Attention, working memory, language and executive function ; Neural models of conscious properties -- Philosophy, neuroscience and consciousness. Measurement, localization, models and dissociation ; Correlates, realizers and multiple realization ; Microphysical reduction, overdetermination and coupling ; Embodied and embedded (...)
     
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  13. Alva Noë & Evan Thompson (2004). Are There Neural Correlates of Consciousness? Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (1):3-28.
    In the past decade, the notion of a neural correlate of consciousness (or NCC) has become a focal point for scientific research on consciousness (Metzinger, 2000a). A growing number of investigators believe that the first step toward a science of consciousness is to discover the neural correlates of consciousness. Indeed, Francis Crick has gone so far as to proclaim that ‘we … need to discover the neural correlates of consciousness.… For this task the primate visual (...)
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  14.  18
    Peter Bieri (1995). Why is Consciousness Puzzling? In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Conscious Experience. Ferdinand Schoningh 45--60.
  15. Bernard Korzeniewski (2010). From Neurons to Self-Consciousness: How the Brain Generates the Mind. Humanity Books.
    The main idea -- The functioning of a neuron -- Brain structure and function -- The general structure of the neural network -- Instincts, emotions, free will -- The nature of mental objects -- The rise and essence of (self-)consciousness -- Artificial intelligence -- Cognitive limitations of man.
     
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  16.  21
    Nancy J. Woolf & Stuart R. Hameroff (2001). A Quantum Approach to Visual Consciousness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (11):472-478.
    A theoretical approach relying on quantum computation in microtubules within neurons can potentially resolve the enigmatic features of visual consciousness, but raises other questions. For example, how can delicate quantum states, which in the technological realm demand extreme cold and isolation to avoid environmental ‘decoherence’, manage to survive in the warm, wet brain? And if such states could survive within neuronal cell interiors, how could quantum states grow to encompass the whole brain? We present a physiological model for visual (...)
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  17. Philip R. Lee (ed.) (1976). Symposium On Consciousness, Presented At The Annual Meeting Of The American Association For The Advancement Of Science, 1974. Viking Press.
  18.  2
    P. G. Petty (1998). Consciousness: A Neurosurgical Perspective. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (1):86-96.
    A neurosurgical view of consciousness is presented. It is biased by our need to deal with coma. The concept of primary or neurosurgical consciousness is discussed, and the anatomy, physiology, pathology and clinical features described in a simple a way. It is suggested that the dynamic interaction between the reticular activating system and the cerebral cortex is the anatomic and physiologic basis for primary consciousness. It is emphasised that this in no way diminishes the role of (...)
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  19. Max Velmans (2001). A Natural Account of Phenomenal Consciousness. Communication and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly Journal 34 (1):39-59.
    Physicalists commonly argue that conscious experiences are nothing more than states of the brain, and that conscious qualia are observer-independent, physical properties of the external world. Although this assumes the 'mantle of science,' it routinely ignores the findings of science, for example in sensory physiology, perception, psychophysics, neuropsychology and comparative psychology. Consequently, although physicalism aims to naturalise consciousness, it gives an unnatural account of it. It is possible, however, to develop a natural, nonreductive, reflexive model of how (...) relates to the brain and the physical world. This paper introduces such a model and how it construes the nature of conscious experience. Within this model the physical world as perceived is viewed as part of conscious experience not apart from it. While in everyday life we treat this phenomenal world as if it is the "physical world", it is really just one biologically useful representation of what the world is like that may differ in many respects from the world described by physics. How the world as perceived relates to the world as described by physics can be investigated by normal science . This model of consciousness appears to be consistent with both third-person evidence of how the brain works and with first-person evidence of what it is like to have a given experience. According to the reflexive model, conscious experiences are really how they seem. (shrink)
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  20.  28
    Paul L. Nunez (2010). Brain, Mind, and the Structure of Reality. Oxford University Press.
    Many faces of consciousness -- Ethics, religion, and the identity of self -- States of mind -- Why hearts don't love and brains don't pump -- EEG : a window on the mind -- Dynamic patterns as shadows of thought -- Networks, waves, and resonant binding -- The limits of science : What do we really know? -- Modern physics, cosmology, and consciousness -- The weird behavior of quantum systems -- Ontological interpretations of quantum mechanics -- Does the (...)
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  21. Robert H. Wozniak (ed.) (1884). Theoretical Roots of Early Behaviourism: Functionalism, the Critique of Introspection, and the Nature and Evolution of Consciousness. Routledge/Thoemmes Press.
    While John B. Watson articulated the intellectual commitments of behaviorism with clarity and force, wove them into a coherent perspective, gave the perspective a name, and made it a cause, these commitments had adherents before him. To document the origins of behaviorism, this series collects the articles that set the terms of the behaviorist debate, includes the most important pre-Watsonian contributions to objectivism, and reprints the first full text of the new behaviorism. Contents: Functionalism, the Critque of Introspection, and the (...)
     
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  22.  14
    Rahul Banerjee & B. K. Chakrabarti (eds.) (2008). Models of Brain and Mind: Physical, Computational, and Psychological Approaches. Elsevier.
    The phenomenon of consciousness has always been a central question for philosophers and scientists. Emerging in the past decade are new approaches to the understanding of consciousness in a scientific light. This book presents a series of essays by leading thinkers giving an account of the current ideas prevalent in the scientific study of consciousness. The value of the book lies in the discussion of this interesting though complex subject from different points of view ranging from physics, (...)
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  23.  34
    Christian Emden (2005). Nietzsche on Language, Consciousness, and the Body. University of Illinois Press.
    The irreducibility of language : the history of rhetoric in the age of typewriters -- The failures of empiricism : language, science, and the philosophical tradition -- What is a trope? : the discourse of metaphor and the language of the body -- The nervous systems of modern consciousness : metaphor, physiology, and mind -- Interpretation and life : outlines of an anthropology of knowledge.
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  24.  89
    Graham A. Jamieson (ed.) (2007). Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press.
    The phenomenon of hypnosis provides a rich paradigm for those seeking to understand the processes that underlie consciousness. Understanding hypnosis tells us about a basic human capacity for altered experiences that is often overlooked in contemporary western societies. Throughout the 200 year history of psychology, hypnosis has been a major topic of investigation by some of the leading experimenters and theorists of each generation. Today hypnosis is emerging again as a lively area of research within cognitive (systems level) neuroscience (...)
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  25.  1
    Martin Lockley (2010). The Evolutionary Dynamics of Consciousness: An Integration of Eastern and Western Holistic Paradigms. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (9-10):9-10.
    Gebserian consciousness structures as expressed in human culture are readily understood as analogous to developmental dynamics in holistic biology, and eastern praxis and philosophy. Probably the most integral and fruitful western paradigm of whole-organism biology is that carefully developed in the Goethean tradition to incorporate an understanding of consciousness. This tradition profoundly understands our early childhood through adult development as a dynamic organic process in time, thus integrating the study of heterochrony and chronobiology with morphology, physiology and (...)
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  26.  19
    Leonard D. Katz (2000). Emotion, Representation, and Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):204-205.
    Rolls's preliminary definitions of emotion and speculative restriction of consciousness, including emotional sentience, to humans, display behaviorist prejudice. Reinforcement and causation are not by themselves sufficient conceptual resources to define either emotion or the directedness of thought and motivated action. For any adequate definition of emotion or delimitation of consciousness, new physiology, such as Rolls is contributing to, and also the resources of other fields, will be required.
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  27.  4
    Hanns-Peter Neumann (2010). Machina Machinarum. Die Uhr Als Begriff and Metapher Zwischen 1450 Und 1750. In Tobias Cheung (ed.), Early Science and Medicine. Brill 122-191.
    The changing use of the clock metaphor serves as a helpful contrast medium to highlight the different concepts of the body-soul-system between 1450 and 1750. This article first relates to the social, political and philosophical functions of the horologium. Then it outlines the different fields of discourse, in which the clock metaphor was mainly invoked. Finally, it examines the writings of a number of significant authors with an eye to the evolution of the clock metaphor in various theological, metaphysical and (...)
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  28.  8
    Ralph D. Ellis (1999). Integrating Neuroscience and Phenomenology in the Study of Consciousness. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 30 (1):18-47.
    Phenomenology and physiology become commensurable through a self-organizational physiology and an "enactive" view of consciousness. Self-organizing processes appropriate and replace their own needed substrata, rather than merely being caused by interacting components. Biochemists apply this notion to the living/nonliving distinction. An enactive approach sees consciousness as actively executed by an agent rather than passively reacting to stimuli. Perception does not result from mere stimulation of brain areas by sensory impulses; unless motivated organismic purposes first anticipate and (...)
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  29. Dara Llewellyn & Craig Pearson (eds.) (2011). Consciousness-Based Education: A Foundation for Teaching and Learning in the Academic Disciplines. Consciousness-Based Books, an Imprint of Maharishi University of Management Press.
    Consciousness-based education and Maharishi Vedic science -- Consciousness-based education and education -- Consciousness-based education and physiology and health -- Consciousness-based education and physics -- Consciousness-based education and mathematics -- Consciousness-based education and literature -- Consciousness-based education and art -- Consciousness-based education and management -- Consciousness-based education and government -- Consciousness-based education and computer science -- Consciousness-based education and sustainability -- Consciousness-based education and world peace.
     
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  30.  18
    David A. Oakley (ed.) (1985). Brain and Mind. Methuen.
  31. L. I. Aftanas & S. A. Golosheikin (2003). Changes in Cortical Activity in Altered States of Consciousness: The Study of Meditation by High-Resolution EEG. Human Physiology 29 (2):143-151.
  32.  68
    M. N. Rusalova (2006). Frequency-Amplitude Characteristics of the EEG at Different Levels of Consciousness. Neuroscience and Behavioral Physiology 36 (4):351-358.
  33.  20
    M. N. Rusalova (2005). Characteristics of Interhemisphere Interactions at Different Levels of Consciousness. Neuroscience and Behavioral Physiology 35 (8):821-827.
  34. N. Andreasen (2000). Is Schizophrenia a Disorder of Memory or Consciousness? In Endel Tulving (ed.), Memory, Consciousness, and the Brain: The Tallinn Conference. Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis
  35.  1
    Benjamin W. Libet (2003). Cerebral Physiology of Conscious Experience: Experimental Studies in Human Subjects. In Naoyuki Osaka (ed.), Neural Basis of Consciousness. John Benjamins 49--57.
  36.  6
    Gerald Alper (2013). The Incredible Shrinking Mind: What Happens When the Human Equation Gets Lost. Karnac.
    From the psychic rat to the gorilla in the room, from British double-agent Kim Philby to comedian Steve Martin, The Incredible Shrinking Mind not only offers a provocative and entertaining critique, but also a profound and practical ...
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  37. P. V. Bundzen, V. V. Zagrantsev, K. G. Korotkov, P. Leisner & L. -E. Unestahl (2000). Comprehsnive Bioelectrographic Analysis of Mechanisms of the Alternative State of Consciousness. Human Physiology 26 (5):558-566.
     
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  38.  1
    Chris Nunn (2005). De La Mettrie's Ghost: The Story of Decisions. Macmillan.
    This book is about how we make choices. It is a compelling analysis of the nature of free will, drawing together evidence from chemistry, literature, politics, history and beyond. Psychiatrist Chris Nunn elegantly explores the revolutions in medicine, genetics, bioethics and neuroscience spurred by Julien de la Mettrie's 300-year-old tract Man the Machine . Nunn concludes that a mechanistic view of the human brain, though once fruitful, is now moribund. He proposes a powerful alternative: that stories, recorded in our memories (...)
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  39. F. N. L. Poynter (ed.) (1958). The History And Philosophy Of Knowledge Of The Brain And Its Functions. Blackwell.
     
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  40. Bernard J. Baars (2005). Subjective Experience is Probably Not Limited to Humans: The Evidence From Neurobiology and Behavior. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):7-21.
    In humans, conscious perception and cognition depends upon the thalamocortical complex, which supports perception, explicit cognition, memory, language, planning, and strategic control. When parts of the T-C system are damaged or stimulated, corresponding effects are found on conscious contents and state, as assessed by reliable reports. In contrast, large regions like cerebellum and basal ganglia can be damaged without affecting conscious cognition directly. Functional brain recordings also show robust activity differences in cortex between experimentally matched conscious and unconscious events. This (...)
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  41. Pietro Gori (2015). Leaving the Soul Apart. An Introductory Study. Philosophical Readings 7 (2):3-13.
    In The Analysis of Mind (1921), Bertrand Russell stresses the importance of William James’ late neutral monist view of consciousness for the studies in psychology. In so doing, he focuses on a topic whose roots can be traced back to the nineteenth-century European debate on physiology and scientific psychology. In this introductory paper I shall briefly outline the path that, starting from the revival of Kant in the German scientific debate, leads to both Ernst Mach’s and William James’ (...)
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  42. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2000). Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):793-842; 904-1018; 1083-1121.
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are isomorphisms (...)
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  43. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2003). Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States. In Edward F. Pace-Schott, Mark Solms, Mark Blagrove & Stevan Harnad (eds.), Sleep and Dreaming: Scientific Advances and Reconsiderations. Cambridge University Press 793-842.
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are isomorphisms (...)
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  44. Antti Revonsuo (2000). The Reinterpretation of Dreams: An Evolutionary Hypothesis of the Function of Dreaming. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):877-901.
    Several theories claim that dreaming is a random by-product of REM sleep physiology and that it does not serve any natural function. Phenomenal dream content, however, is not as disorganized as such views imply. The form and content of dreams is not random but organized and selective: during dreaming, the brain constructs a complex model of the world in which certain types of elements, when compared to waking life, are underrepresented whereas others are over represented. Furthermore, dream content is (...)
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  45.  6
    Jana Speth, Trevor A. Harley & Clemens Speth (2016). Auditory Verbal Experience and Agency in Waking, Sleep Onset, REM, and Non‐REM Sleep. Cognitive Science 40 (5).
    We present one of the first quantitative studies on auditory verbal experiences and auditory verbal agency voices or characters”) in healthy participants across states of consciousness. Tools of quantitative linguistic analysis were used to measure participants’ implicit knowledge of auditory verbal experiences and auditory verbal agencies, displayed in mentation reports from four different states. Analysis was conducted on a total of 569 mentation reports from rapid eye movement sleep, non-REM sleep, sleep onset, and waking. Physiology was controlled with (...)
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  46.  68
    Benjamin Libet, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Lynn Nadel (eds.) (2010). Conscious Will and Responsibility: A Tribute to Benjamin Libet. Oxford University Press.
    Benjamin Libet, Do we have free will? -- Adina L. Roskies, Why Libet's studies don't pose a threat to free will? -- Alfred r. mele, libet on free will : readiness potentials, decisions, and awareness? -- Susan Pockett and Suzanne Purdy, Are voluntary movements initiated preconsciously? : the relationships between readiness potentials, urges, and decisions? -- William P. Banks and Eve A. Isham, Do we really know what we are doing? : implications of reported time of decision for theories of (...)
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  47.  1
    Martina Gandola, Gabriella Bottini, Laura Zapparoli, Paola Invernizzi, Margherita Verardi, Roberto Sterzi, Ignazio Santilli, Maurizio Sberna & Eraldo Paulesu (2014). The Physiology of Motor Delusions in Anosognosia for Hemiplegia: Implications for Current Models of Motor Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 24:98-112.
  48.  54
    P. V. Simonov (1994). Consciousness and the Brain. Neuroscience and Behavioral Physiology 24:234-38.
  49.  15
    Ralph D. Ellis (2010). How the Mind Uses the Brain: To Move the Body and Image the Universe. Open Court.
    Introduction: Searching for the covert agent of consciousness -- The devil's pact (or, why the hard problem is now so hard) -- Action at the macro level : an agent-based theory of intentionality -- Action imagery and representation of the external world -- Do we need an emergency metaphysician? : action versus reaction at the micro level -- Herding neurons : the causal structure of self-organizing systems -- The paradoxes of phenomenal consciousness -- The self-organizing imagination : addressing (...)
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  50. D. B. Lindsley (1960). Attention, Consciousness, Sleep, and Wakefulness. In H. W. Magoun & V. Hall (eds.), Handbook of Physiology. Section I: Neurophysiology. American Physiological Society
     
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