Search results for 'Consequentialism (Ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  62
    Infinite Ethics, Infinite Ethics.
    Aggregative consequentialism and several other popular moral theories are threatened with paralysis: when coupled with some plausible assumptions, they seem to imply that it is always ethically indifferent what you do. Modern cosmology teaches that the world might well contain an infinite number of happy and sad people and other candidate value-bearing locations. Aggregative ethics implies that such a world contains an infinite amount of positive value and an infinite amount of negative value. You can affect only a finite (...)
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  2.  74
    Scott Forschler (2013). Kantian and Consequentialist Ethics: The Gap Can Be Bridged. Metaphilosophy 44 (1-2):88-104.
    Richard Hare argues that the fundamental assumptions of Kant's ethical system should have led Kant to utilitarianism, had Kant not confused a norm's generality with its universality, and hence adopted rigorist, deontological norms. Several authors, including Jens Timmermann, have argued contra Hare that the gap between Kantian and utilitarian/consequentialist ethics is fundamental and cannot be bridged. This article shows that Timmermann's claims rely on a systematic failure to separate normative and metaethical aspects of each view, and that Hare's attempt to (...)
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  3.  52
    Eric A. Heinze (2005). Commonsense Morality and the Consequentialist Ethics of Humanitarian Intervention. Journal of Military Ethics 4 (3):168-182.
    Abstract Finding a moral justification for humanitarian intervention has been the objective of a great deal of academic inquiry in recent years. Most of these treatments, however, make certain arguments or assumptions about the morality of humanitarian intervention without fully exploring their precise philosophical underpinnings, which has led to an increasingly disjointed body of literature. The purpose of this essay, therefore, is to suggest that the conventional arguments and assumptions made about the morality of humanitarian intervention can be encompassed in (...)
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  4. Martin Peterson (2013). The Dimensions of Consequentialism: Ethics, Equality and Risk. Cambridge University Press.
    Consequentialism, one of the major theories of normative ethics, maintains that the moral rightness of an act is determined solely by the act's consequences. The traditional form of consequentialism is one-dimensional, in that the rightness of an act is a function of a single moral aspect, such as the sum total of wellbeing it produces. In this book Martin Peterson introduces a new type of consequentialist theory: multidimensional consequentialism. According to this theory, an act's moral rightness depends (...)
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  5.  32
    Sandeep Sreekumar (2012). An Analysis of Consequentialism and Deontology in the Normative Ethics of the Bhagavadgītā. Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (3):277-315.
    This paper identifies the different normative ethical arguments stated and suggested by Arjuna and Krishna in the Gītā , analyzes those arguments, examines the interrelations between those arguments, and demonstrates that, contrary to a common view, both Arjuna and Krishna advance ethical theories of a broad consequentialist nature. It is shown that Krishna’s ethical theory, in particular, is a distinctive kind of rule-consequentialism that takes as intrinsically valuable the twin consequences of mokṣa and lokasaṃgraha . It is also argued (...)
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  6.  19
    Vasil Gluchman (2007). Human Dignity and Non-Utilitarian Consequentialist "Ethics of Social Consequences". The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1 (7):159-165.
    The main objective of my paper is to show that human dignity has a significant position in my ethics of social consequences (I defend a form of non-utilitarian consequentialism), arguing for a particular theory of the value of human dignity. I argue that my ethics of social consequences is capable of accepting human dignity and all authentic human moral values without exception. I think that my ethical theory of social consequences (as a form of non-utilitarian consequentialism) can provide (...)
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  7.  27
    Don Gotterbarn & James Moor (2009). Virtual Decisions: Video Game Ethics, Just Consequentialism, and Ethics on the Fly. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 39 (3):27-42.
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  8.  16
    Subrata Chakrabarty & A. Erin Bass (2015). Comparing Virtue, Consequentialist, and Deontological Ethics-Based Corporate Social Responsibility: Mitigating Microfinance Risk in Institutional Voids. Journal of Business Ethics 126 (3):487-512.
    Due to the nature of lending practices and support services offered to the poor in developing countries, portfolio risk is a growing concern for the microfinance industry. Though previous research highlights the importance of risk for microfinance organizations, not much is known about how microfinance organizations can mitigate risks incurred from providing loans to the poor in developing countries. Further, though many microfinance organizations practice corporate social responsibility to help create economic and social wealth in developing countries, the impact of (...)
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  9. Michael Cholbi (2013). Dimensions of Consequentialism: Ethics, Equality, and Risk. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2013:1-2.
  10.  30
    D. Goldstick (2002). The 'Two Hats' Problem in Consequentialist Ethics. Utilitas 14 (1):108.
    A largely deontological conscience will probably optimize consequences. But Bernard Williams objects to the, if one therefore embraces indirect consequentialism, of. Admittedly the strategy is painful, and a counsel of imperfection at best. But it need not be psychologically impossible, inconsistent, or even self-deceptive, given ethical cognitivism.
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  11.  3
    Brian G. Henning (2015). Peterson, Martin.The Dimensions of Consequentialism: Ethics, Equality and Risk.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Pp. 217. $90.00. [REVIEW] Ethics 125 (3):900-905.
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  12.  1
    Review by: Brian G. Henning (2015). Review: Martin Peterson, The Dimensions of Consequentialism: Ethics, Equality and Risk. [REVIEW] Ethics 125 (3):900-905,.
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  13.  6
    Ralf M. Bader (2014). M. Peterson, The Dimensions of Consequentialism: Ethics, Equality and Risk, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013, 217 Pp., GBP 55.00/ Euro 90.00 , ISBN 9781107033030. [REVIEW] Dialectica 68 (4):620-625.
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  14.  60
    Bryan W. Van Norden (2007). Virtue Ethics and Consequentialism in Early Chinese Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, Bryan W. Van Norden examines early Confucianism as a form of virtue ethics and Mohism, an anti-Confucian movement, as a version of consequentialism. The philosophical methodology is analytic, in that the emphasis is on clear exegesis of the texts and a critical examination of the philosophical arguments proposed by each side. Van Norden shows that Confucianism, while similar to Aristotelianism in being a form of virtue ethics, offers different conceptions of “the good life,” the virtues, human (...)
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  15.  16
    Joanna M. Burch-Brown (2014). Martin Peterson, The Dimensions of Consequentialism: Ethics, Equality and Risk , Pp. Vii + 217. [REVIEW] Utilitas 26 (2):223-226.
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  16.  7
    Peter Lucas (2002). Environmental Ethics: Between Inconsequential Philosophy and Unphilosophical Consequentialism. Environmental Ethics 24 (4):353-369.
    Andrew Light and Eric Katz commend environmental pragmatism as a framework of choice for a more pluralistic, and (consequently) more practically effective environmental ethics. There is however a prima facie conflict between the promotion of pluralism and the promotion of pragmatism. I consider two different routes by which Light has attempted to resolve this conflict. Light’s first strategy involves distinguishing philosophical from metaphilosophical forms of pragmatism, locating its “metatheoretically pluralist” potential in the latter. I argue that the distinction collapses, leaving (...)
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  17. Berel Dov Lerner (2004). S. Jack Odell, On Consequentialist Ethics Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (2):136-140.
     
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  18. V. Gluchman (1998). A Typology of Morals and Moral Subjects in Consequentialist Ethics. Filozofia 53 (8):523-537.
     
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  19. T. Munz (2002). Consequentialist Ethics of Vasil Gluchman. Filozofia 57 (4):275-284.
     
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  20.  32
    Christian Piller (forthcoming). ‘How to Overstretch the Ethics-Epistemology Analogy: Berker’s Critique of Epistemic Consequentialism’. In Martin Grajner (ed.), Epistemic Reasons, Epistemic Norms, and Epistemic Goals. De Gruyter 305-319.
  21.  67
    Jane Singleton (2002). Virtue Ethics, Kantian Ethics, and Consequentialism. Journal of Philosophical Research 27:537-551.
    Contemporary theories of Virtue Ethics are often presented as being in opposition to Kantian Ethics and Consequentialism. It is argued that Virtue Ethics takes as fundamental the question, “What sort of character would a virtuous person have?” and that Kantian Ethics and Consequentialism take as fundamental the question, “What makes an action right?” I argue that this opposition is misconceived. The opposition is rather between Virtue Ethics and Kantian Ethics on the one hand and Consequentialism on the (...)
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  22. Julia Driver (2005). Consequentialism and Feminist Ethics. Hypatia 20 (4):183-199.
    : This essay attempts to show that sophisticated consequentialism is able to accommodate the concerns that have traditionally been raised by feminist writers in ethics. Those concerns have primarily to do with the fact that consequentialism is seen as both too demanding of the individual and neglectful of the agent's special obligations to family and friends. Here, I argue that instrumental justification for partiality can be provided, for example, even though an attitude of partiality is not characterized itself (...)
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  23.  72
    Charles Goodman (2008). Consequentialism, Agent-Neutrality, and Mahāyāna Ethics. Philosophy East and West 58 (1):17-35.
    : What kinds of comparisons can legitimately be made between Mahāyāna Buddhism and Western ethical theories? Mahāyānists aspire to alleviate the suffering, promote the happiness, and advance the moral perfection of all sentient beings. This aspiration is best understood as expressing a form of universalist consequentialism. Many Indian Mahāyāna texts seem committed to claims about agent-neutrality that imply consequentialism and are not compatible with virtue ethics. Within the Mahāyāna tradition, there is some diversity of views: Asaṅga seems to (...)
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  24.  7
    Marta Gluchmanova (2008). Non-Utilitarian Consequentialism and its Application in the Ethics of Teaching. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:67-75.
    This paper aims to present of the ethics of social consequences (a form of non-utilitarian consequentialism) as a theoretical basis for the examination of teacher ethics and a tool for dealing with practical moral problems of the teaching profession. Teachers’ duty is to help students, teach them to recognize the difference between good and evil, right and wrong, show them that they have moral responsibility for their actions and all this can be very well attained on the basis of (...)
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  25. Avram Hiller, Ramona Ilea & Leonard Kahn (eds.) (2015). Consequentialism and Environmental Ethics. Routledge.
    This volume works to connect issues in environmental ethics with the best work in contemporary normative theory. Environmental issues challenge contemporary ethical theorists to account for topics that traditional ethical theories do not address to any significant extent. This book articulates and evaluates consequentialist responses to that challenge. Contributors provide a thorough and well-rounded analysis of the benefits and limitations of the consequentialist perspective in addressing environmental issues. In particular, the contributors use consequentialist theory to address central questions in environmental (...)
     
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  26. Avram Hiller, Ramona Ilea & Leonard Kahn (eds.) (2013). Consequentialism and Environmental Ethics. Routledge.
    This volume works to connect issues in environmental ethics with the best work in contemporary normative theory. Environmental issues challenge contemporary ethical theorists to account for topics that traditional ethical theories do not address to any significant extent. This book articulates and evaluates consequentialist responses to that challenge. Contributors provide a thorough and well-rounded analysis of the benefits and limitations of the consequentialist perspective in addressing environmental issues. In particular, the contributors use consequentialist theory to address central questions in environmental (...)
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  27. Avram Hiller, Ramona Ilea & Leonard Kahn (eds.) (2013). Consequentialism and Environmental Ethics. Routledge.

    This volume works to connect issues in environmental ethics with the best work in contemporary normative theory. Environmental issues challenge contemporary ethical theorists to account for topics that traditional ethical theories do not address to any significant extent. This book articulates and evaluates consequentialist responses to that challenge. Contributors provide a thorough and well-rounded analysis of the benefits and limitations of the consequentialist perspective in addressing environmental issues. In particular, the contributors use consequentialist theory to address central questions in environmental (...)

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  28. Bryan van Norden (2007). Virtue Ethics and Consequentialism in Early Chinese Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book Bryan W. Van Norden examines early Confucianism as a form of virtue ethics and Mohism, an anti-Confucian movement, as a version of consequentialism. The philosophical methodology is analytic, in that the emphasis is on clear exegesis of the texts and a critical examination of the philosophical arguments proposed by each side. Van Norden shows that Confucianism, while similar to Aristotelianism in being a form of virtue ethics, offers different conceptions of 'the good life', the virtues, human (...)
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  29. Bryan van Norden (2007). Virtue Ethics and Consequentialism in Early Chinese Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book Bryan W. Van Norden examines early Confucianism as a form of virtue ethics and Mohism, an anti-Confucian movement, as a version of consequentialism. The philosophical methodology is analytic, in that the emphasis is on clear exegesis of the texts and a critical examination of the philosophical arguments proposed by each side. Van Norden shows that Confucianism, while similar to Aristotelianism in being a form of virtue ethics, offers different conceptions of 'the good life', the virtues, human (...)
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  30. Bryan van Norden (2012). Virtue Ethics and Consequentialism in Early Chinese Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book Bryan W. Van Norden examines early Confucianism as a form of virtue ethics and Mohism, an anti-Confucian movement, as a version of consequentialism. The philosophical methodology is analytic, in that the emphasis is on clear exegesis of the texts and a critical examination of the philosophical arguments proposed by each side. Van Norden shows that Confucianism, while similar to Aristotelianism in being a form of virtue ethics, offers different conceptions of 'the good life', the virtues, human (...)
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  31.  90
    David S. Oderberg (2000). Applied Ethics: A Non-Consequentialist Approach. Blackwell.
    Most of these books, however, defend approaches that are consequentialist or specifically utilitarian in nature.
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  32.  76
    F. M. Kamm (2007). Intricate Ethics: Rights, Responsibilities, and Permissible Harm. New York ;Oxford University Press.
    In Intricate Ethics, Kamm questions the moral importance of some non-consequentialist distinctions and then introduces and argues for the moral importance of ...
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  33.  29
    Marco Annoni, Virginia Sanchini & Cecilia Nardini (2013). The Ethics of Non-Inferiority Trials: A Consequentialist Analysis. Research Ethics 9 (3):109-120.
    Discussions about the merits and shortcomings of non-inferiority trials are becoming increasingly common in the medical community and among regulatory agencies. However, criticisms targeting the ethical standing of non-inferiority trials have often been mistargeted. In this article we review the ethical standing of trials of non-inferiority. In the first part of the article, we outline a consequentialist position according to which clinical trials are best conceived as epistemic tools aimed at fostering the proper ends of medicine. According to this view, (...)
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  34.  21
    Michael Parker (2004). Consent to HIV Testing and Consequentialism in Health Care Ethics. HEC Forum 16 (1):45-52.
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  35. Peter J. Hammond (1991). Consequentialist Decision Theory and Utilitarian Ethics. European University Institute.
     
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  36. Brad Hooker (2000). Ideal Code, Real World: A Rule-Consequentialist Theory of Morality. Oxford University Press.
    What are the appropriate criteria for assessing a theory of morality? In this enlightening work, Brad Hooker begins by answering this question. He then argues for a rule-consequentialist theory which, in part, asserts that acts should be assessed morally in terms of impartially justified rules. In the end, he considers the implications of rule-consequentialism for several current controversies in practical ethics, making this clearly written, engaging book the best overall statement of this approach to ethics.
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  37. Rosalind Hursthouse (2002). Virtue Ethics Vs. Rule-Consequentialism: A Reply to Brad Hooker. Utilitas 14 (1):41.
    In On Virtue Ethics I offered a criterion for a character trait's being a virtue according to which a virtuous character trait must conduce to, or at least not be inimical to, four ends, one of which is the continuance of the human species. I argue here that this does not commit me to homosexuality's being a vice, since homosexuality is not a character trait and hence not up for assessment as a virtue or a vice. Vegetarianism is not up (...)
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  38.  20
    Gordon Davis (2013). Traces of Consequentialism and Non-Consequentialism In Bodhisattva Ethics. Philosophy East and West 63 (2):275-305.
    It is difficult to generalize about ethical values in the Mahāyāna Buddhist tradition, let alone in Buddhist philosophy more generally. One author identifies seventeen distinct ethical approaches in the Mahāyāna scholarly traditions alone (i.e., not including various folk traditions).1 Nonetheless, in comparative studies in the history of ethics, there is increasing recognition that several different Buddhist traditions have stressed a foundational role for universalist altruism that was largely absent from ancient Greek eudaimonism and perhaps even absent-qua foundational-from most other premodern (...)
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  39.  48
    Christine Swanton (2001). Virtue Ethics, Value-Centredness, and Consequentialism. Utilitas 13 (2):213.
    This paper argues against two major features of consequentialist conceptions of virtue: Value-centredness and the Hegemony of Promotion as a mode of moral acknowledgement or responsiveness. In relation to the first feature, I argue against two ideas: Value should be understood entirely independently of virtue; and The only right-making respects which serve to make an action better than another is degree of value. I argue that what I call the bases of moral response are several, including also status, the good (...)
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  40.  45
    Alan Carter (2005). Inegalitarian Biocentric Consequentialism, the Minimax Implication and Multidimensional Value Theory: A Brief Proposal for a New Direction in Environmental Ethics. Utilitas 17 (1):62-84.
    Perhaps the most impressive environmental ethic developed to date in any detail is Robin Attfield's biocentric consequentialism. Indeed, on first study, it appears sufficiently impressive that, before presenting any alternative theoretical approach, one would first need to establish why one should not simply embrace Attfield's. After outlining a seemingly decisive flaw in his theory, and then criticizing his response to it, this article adumbrates a very different theoretical basis for an environmental ethic: namely, a value-pluralist one. In so doing, (...)
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  41.  12
    Thomas Brian Mooney (2011). Global Ethics: The Challenge of Loyalty: Contemporary Consequentialism and Deontology. Ethics Education 17 (2):3-24.
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  42.  28
    Sarah Chan & John Harris (2010). Consequentialism Without Consequences: Ethics and Embryo Research. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (1):61.
    The legitimacy of embryo research, use, and destruction is among the most important issues facing contemporary bioethics. In the preceding paper, Ingmar Persson and Julian Savulescu took up an argument of John Harris and tried to find some new ways of avoiding its dramatic consequences. They noted that: “John Harris has argued that if … it is morally permissible to engage in reproduction … despite knowledge that a large number of embryos will fail to implant and quickly die, then … (...)
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  43. T. Mooney (2011). Global Ethics: The Challenge of Loyalty Traditional Utilitarian Consequentialism and Deontology. Ethics Education 17 (1).
     
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  44. Richard Boyd (2003). Finite Beings, Finite Goods: The Semantics, Metaphysics and Ethics of Naturalist Consequentialism, Part I. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (3):505–553.
  45.  53
    Benjamin Sachs (2015). Non-Consequentialist Theories of Animal Ethics. Analysis 75 (4):638-654.
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  46. Richard Boyd (2003). Finite Beings, Finite Goods: The Semantics, Metaphysics and Ethics of Naturalist Consequentialism, Part II. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (1):24–47.
  47.  66
    Michael Slote (2009). Comments on Bryan Van Norden's Virtue Ethics and Consequentialism in Early Chinese Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (3):289-295.
  48. Hallvard Lillehammer (2011). Consequentialism and Global Ethics. In Michael Boylan (ed.), The Morality and Global Justice Reader. Westview Press 89.
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  49.  32
    Kai Nielsen (1994). Methods of Ethics:Wide Reflective Equilibrium and a Kind of Consequentialism. Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (2):57-72.
  50.  26
    Alexus McLeod (2010). Virtue Ethics and Consequentialism in Early Chinese Philosophy (Review). Philosophy East and West 60 (4):554-557.
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