Search results for 'Constitution (Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    James Marshall, Michael Peters & Patrick Fitzsimons (1997). Education and the Philosophy of the Subject (or Constitution of Self). Educational Philosophy and Theory 29 (1).
    (1997). Education and the philosophy of the subject (or constitution of self) Educational Philosophy and Theory: Vol. 29, No. 1, pp. v-xi. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-5812.1997.tb00523.x.
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  2. Benjamin Kozuch & Uriah Kriegel (2015). Correlation, Causation, Constitution: On the Interplay Between the Science and Philosophy of Consciousness. In S. M. Miller (ed.), The Constitution of Phenomenal Consciousness. John Benjamins 400-417.
    Consciousness is a natural phenomenon, the object of a flourishing area of research in the natural sciences – research whose primary goal is to identify the neural correlates of consciousness. This raises the question: why is there need for a philosophy of consciousness? As we see things, the need for a philosophy of consciousness arises for two reasons. First, as a young and energetic science operating as yet under no guiding paradigm, the science of consciousness has been subject to considerable (...)
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  3. Robert E. Statham (1998). The Constitution of Public Philosophy: Toward a Synthesis of Freedom and Responsibility in Postmodern America. Upa.
    America, and the postmodern West in particular, are experiencing a moral and intellectual crisis, according to E. Robert Statham, Jr. In The Constitution of Public Philosophy, Statham argues that Walter Lippman was correct in locating this crisis in the impoverished nature of public philosophy, and he attempts to constitute a role for reason in contemporary America. Statham suggests that the negative rule of law via a written constitution requires the positive rule of reason, or political philosophy, in order (...)
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  4.  11
    Howard Stein (1969). Philosophy of Space and Time and the Inner Constitution of Nature: A Phenomenological Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 66 (2):58-62.
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  5. Gerhard Endress, Jan Aertsen & Klaus Braun (eds.) (1999). Averroes and the Aristotelian Tradition: Sources, Constitution, and Reception of the Philosophy of Ibn Rushd (1126-1198): Proceedings of the Fourth Symposium Averroicum, Cologne, 1996. [REVIEW] Brill.
     
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  6.  3
    John Francis Quinn (1973). The Historical Constitution of St. Bonaventure's Philosophy. Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.
  7. John Stewart (1813). The Scripture of Reason and Nature the Laws of Intellect : The Laws of Virtue : The Laws of Policy : The Laws of Physiology, or, the Philosophy of Sense : Developing the Origin, End, Essence and Constitution of Nature. Printed for T. Egerton.
     
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  8. Michael Whiteman (1967). Philosophy of Space and Time and the Inner Constitution of Nature. New York, Humanities P..
    First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
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  9. Anton Froeyman (2010). Anticipation and the Constitution of Time in the Philosophy of Ernst Cassirer. International Journal of Computing Anticipatory Systems 23:64-73.
    In this paper, I will argue with Ernst Cassirer that anticipation plays an essential part in the constitution of time, as seen from a transcendental perspective. Time is, as any transcendental concept, regarded as basically relational and subjective and only in a derivative way objective and indifferent to us. This entails that memory is prior to history, and that anticipation is prior to prediction. In this paper, I will give some examples in order to argue for this point. Furthermore, (...)
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  10.  30
    M. F. X. Millar (1938). Philosophy of the Constitution. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 13 (1):48-67.
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  11.  12
    James P. Young (1992). Philosophy, “The Federalist,” and the Constitution. International Studies in Philosophy 24 (1):150-150.
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  12.  2
    Craig Walton (1990). Philosophy, "The Federalist," and the Constitution. Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (3):456-457.
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  13. David Watson (1992). Conditions Handsome and Unhandsome: The Constitution of Emersonian Perfectionism; American Philosophy and the Romantic Tradition. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 60.
  14. Richard McKeon (1938). The Development of the Concept of Property in Political Philosophy: A Study of the Background of the Constitution. Ethics 48 (3):297-366.
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  15.  5
    Morton White (1988). Philosophy, the Federalist, and the Constitution. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 24 (2):287-293.
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  16.  4
    Bernard W. Dempsey (1932). The Constitution and Our Economic Philosophy. Modern Schoolman 9 (2):32-34.
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  17.  7
    J. J. C. Smart & Michael Whiteman (1968). Philosophy of Space and Time, and the Inner Constitution of Nature: A Phenomenological Study. Philosophical Quarterly 18 (73):372.
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  18.  19
    Dominic J. O'Meara (2009). The Reception of Greek Philosophy (C.) D'Ancona (Ed.) The Libraries of the Neoplatonists. Proceedings of the Meeting of the European Science Foundation Network 'Late Antiquity and Arabic Thought. Patterns in the Constitution of European Culture' Held in Strasbourg, March 12–14, 2004 Under the Impulsion of the Scientific Committee of the Meeting, Composed by Matthias Baltes†, Michel Cacouros, Cristina D'Ancona, Tiziano Dorandi, Gerhard Endreß, Philippe Hoffmann, Henri Hugonnard Roche. (Philosophia Antiqua 107.) Pp. Xxxvi + 531. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2007. Cased, €149, US$199. ISBN: 978-90-04-15641-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (02):438-.
  19.  11
    B. W. A. (1975). The Historical Constitution of St. Bonaventure's Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 29 (1):145-148.
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  20.  10
    Walter Nicgorski (1990). Philosophy, The Federalist and the Constitution. Review of Metaphysics 43 (3):654-656.
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  21.  11
    Louis Dupré (1963). The Constitution of the Self in Kierkegaard's Philosophy. International Philosophical Quarterly 3 (4):506-526.
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  22.  8
    Jerome Knies (1976). The Historical Constitution of St. Bonaventure's Philosophy. Augustinianum 16 (3):598-599.
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  23. L. Davidson (1992). Review of E. Husserl, Ideas Pertaining to Apure Phenomenology and to a Phenomenological Philosophy. Second Book: Studies in the Phenomenology of Constitution (R. Rojcewicz & A. Schuwer, Trans.). [REVIEW] Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 23.
     
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  24.  1
    John P. Doyle (1976). "The Historical Constitution of St. Bonaventure's Philosophy," by John Francis Quinn. Modern Schoolman 54 (1):88-90.
  25.  1
    Roberto Gronda (2013). From Methodology to Ontology: Interdisciplinarity as a Principle of Constitution of Objectivity—Reflections From the Study of American Philosophy. History of European Ideas 40 (4):1-16.
    The idea of interdisciplinarity can be articulated in different ways. The aim of the article is to criticise the view that interdisciplinarity is to be treated as a quality of the historian's approach to his subject-matter, and to argue for a constructivist interpretation of that notion. A constructivist account of interdisciplinarity relies on the thesis that the latter is one of the manifold ways in which it is possible to give sense to the historical records of which the historian wants (...)
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  26. K. Arp (1991). E. Husserl, "Ideas Pertaining to a Pure Phenomenology and to a Phenomenological Philosophy. Second Book: Studies in the Phenomenology of Constitution". Translated by R. Rojcewicz and A. Schuwer. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 8 (2):154.
     
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  27. J. Benoist (1994). Toward a Changing Ontological Assessment of Kantian Transendental-Aesthetics-Questioning a Platonic Constitution of Philosophy. Archives de Philosophie 57 (2):307-324.
     
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  28. James E. Fleming (2006). The Place of History and Philosophy in the Moral Reading of the American Constitution. In Scott Hershovitz (ed.), Exploring Law's Empire: The Jurisprudence of Ronald Dworkin. Oxford University Press
     
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  29. George Anastaplo (1989). Book Review:Philosophy, "The Federalist," and the Constitution. Morton White. [REVIEW] Ethics 99 (3):655-.
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  30. W. Jenkyn Jones (2007). 406 International Journal of Ethics. Fied to Learn That Sir Joshua has Elsewhere Admitted That" Rules and Methods of Teaching, If They Are to Be Worth Anything Must Ultimately Be Based on Mental Philosophy and on Acquaintance with the Laws of Thought and with the Constitution of Human Na. In Laurie DiMauro (ed.), Ethics. Greenhaven Press 296.
     
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  31. Adrian Mirvish (2001). Department of Philosophy California State University Chico. California Sartre on Constitution: Gestalt Theory, Instrumentality. Existentia 11:407.
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  32. Michael Whiteman (2015). Philosophy of Space and Time: And the Inner Constitution of Nature. Routledge.
    First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  33. Michael Whiteman (2014). Philosophy of Space and Time: And the Inner Constitution of Nature. Routledge.
    First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  34. Michael Whiteman (2004). Philosophy of Space and Time: And the Inner Constitution of Nature. Routledge.
    First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  35. John Wippel (1980). John F. Quinn: "The Historical Constitution of St. Bonaventure's Philosophy". [REVIEW] The Thomist 44 (1):143.
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  36.  59
    Robert Sokolowski (1964). The Formation of Husserl's Concept of Constitution. The Hague, M. Nijhoff.
    In tracing the formation of Husserl's concept of constitution, we hope to further the understanding of what he considers a philosophical explanation. ...
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  37.  31
    Wolfgang Huemer (2005). The Constitution of Consciousness: A Study in Analytic Phenomenology. Routledge.
    Through the work of philosophers like Sellars, Davidson, and McDowell, the question of how the mind is related to the world has gained new importance in contemporary analytic philosophy. This book demonstrates that Husserl's phenomenological analyses of the structure of consciousness can provide fruitful insights for developing an original approach to these questions.
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  38. Rudolf Carnap (1967). The Logical Structure of the World [and] Pseudoproblems in Philosophy. London, Routledge K. Paul.
    Available for the first time in 20 years, here are two important works from the 1920s by the best-known representative of the Vienna Circle.
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  39. Jeffrey Grupp (2006). Mereological Nihilism: Quantum Atomism and the Impossibility of Material Constitution. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 16 (3):245-386.
    Mereological nihilism is the philosophical position that there are no items that have parts. If there are no items with parts then the only items that exist are partless fundamental particles, such as the true atoms (also called philosophical atoms) theorized to exist by some ancient philosophers, some contemporary physicists, and some contemporary philosophers. With several novel arguments I show that mereological nihilism is the correct theory of reality. I will also discuss strong similarities that mereological nihilism has with empirical (...)
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  40.  7
    Jens Harbecke (2015). Regularity Constitution and the Location of Mechanistic Levels. Foundations of Science 20 (3):323-338.
    This paper discusses the role of levels and level-bound theoretical terms in neurobiological explanations under the presupposition of a regularity theory of constitution. After presenting the definitions for the constitution relation and the notion of a mechanistic level in the sense of the regularity theory, the paper develops a set of inference rules that allow to determine whether two mechanisms referred to by one or more accepted explanations belong to the same level, or to different levels. The rules (...)
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  41.  65
    Ursula Renz (2011). From Philosophy to Criticism of Myth: Cassirer's Concept of Myth. Synthese 179 (1):135 - 152.
    This article discusses the question whether or not Cassirer's philosophical critique of technological use of myth in The Myth of the State implies a revision of his earlier conception and theory of myth as provided by The Philosophy of Symbolic Forms. In the first part, Cassirer's early theory of myth is compared with other approaches of his time. It is claimed that Cassirer's early approach to myth has to be understood in terms of a transcendental philosophical approach. In consequence, myth (...)
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  42. Lynne Rudder Baker (2000). Persons and Bodies: A Constitution View. Cambridge University Press.
    What is a human person, and what is the relation between a person and his or her body? In her third book on the philosophy of mind, Lynne Rudder Baker investigates what she terms the person/body problem and offers a detailed account of the relation between human persons and their bodies. Baker's argument is based on the 'Constitution View' of persons and bodies, which aims to show what distinguishes persons from all other beings and to show how we can (...)
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  43. Jeffrey L. Kosky (2001). Levinas and the Philosophy of Religion. Indiana University Press.
    Levinas and the Philosophy of Religion Jeffrey L. Kosky Reveals the interplay of phenomenology and religion in Levinas’s thought. "Kosky examines Levinas’s thought from the perspective of the philosophy of religion and he does so in a way that is attentive to the philosophical nuances of Levinas’s argument.... an insightful, well written, and carefully documented study... that uniquely illuminates Levinas’s work." —John D. Caputo For readers who suspect there is no place for religion and morality in postmodern philosophy, Jeffrey L. (...)
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  44.  27
    Jens Harbecke (2013). The Role of Supervenience and Constitution in Neuroscientific Research. Synthese 191 (5):1-19.
    This paper is concerned with the notions of supervenience and mechanistic constitution as they have been discussed in the philosophy of neuroscience. Since both notions essentially involve specific dependence and determination relations among properties and sets of properties, the question arises whether the notions are systematically connected and how they connect to science. In a first step, some definitions of supervenience and mechanistic constitution are presented and tested for logical independence. Afterwards, certain assumptions fundamental to neuroscientific inquiry are (...)
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  45. Nick Zangwill (2012). Constitution and Causation. Metaphysica 13 (1):1-6.
    I argue that the constitution relation transmits causal efficacy and thus is a suitable relation to deploy in many troubled areas of philosophy, such as the mind–body problem. We need not demand identity.
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  46. Filip Mattens (2009). Perception, Body, and the Sense of Touch: Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 25 (2):97-120.
    In recent philosophy of mind, a series of challenging ideas have appeared about the relation between the body and the sense of touch. In certain respects, these ideas have a striking affinity with Husserl’s theory of the constitution of the body. Nevertheless, these two approaches lead to very different understandings of the role of the body in perception. Either the body is characterized as a perceptual “organ,” or the body is said to function as a “template.” Despite its focus (...)
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  47. Robert A. Wilson (2009). The Transitivity of Material Constitution. Noûs 43 (2):363-377.
    In metaphysics, the view that material constitution is transitive is ubiquitous, an assumption expressed by both proponents and critics of constitution views. Likewise, it is typically assumed within the philosophy of mind that physical realization is a transitive relation. In both cases, this assumption of transitivity plays a role in discussion of the broader implications of a metaphysics that invokes either relation. Here I provide reasons for questioning this assumption and the uses to which this appeal to transitivity (...)
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  48. John B. Brough (2008). Consciousness is Not a Bag: Immanence, Transcendence, and Constitution in the Idea of Phenomenology. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 24 (3):177-191.
    A fruitful way to approach The Idea of Phenomenology is through Husserl’s claim that consciousness is not a bag, box, or any other kind of container. The bag conception, which dominated much of modern philosophy, is rooted in the idea that philosophy is restricted to investigating only what is really immanent to consciousness, such as acts and sensory contents. On this view, what Husserl called the riddle of transcendence can never be solved. The phenomenological reduction, as Husserl develops it in (...)
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  49. Hagit Benbaji (2008). Constitution and the Explanatory Gap. Synthese 161 (2):183-202.
    Proponents of the explanatory gap claim that consciousness is a mystery. No one has ever given an account of how a physical thing could be identical to a phenomenal one. We fully understand the identity between water and H2O but the identity between pain and the firing of C-fibers is inconceivable. Mark Johnston [Journal of philosophy , 564–583] suggests that if water is constituted by H2O, not identical to it, then the explanatory gap becomes a pseudo-problem. This is because all (...)
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  50.  57
    Wolfgang Huemer (2003). Husserl and Haugeland on Constitution. Synthese 137 (3):345-368.
    Both Husserl and Haugeland develop an account of constitution to address the question of how our mental episodes can be about physical objects and thus, through the intentional relation, bridge the gap between the mental and the physical. The respective theories of the two philosophers of very different background show not only how mental episodes can have empirical content, but also how this content is shaped by past experiences or a holistic background of other mental episodes. In this article (...)
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