Search results for 'Consumer Interests' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. James A. Morone & Theodore R. Marmor (1981). Representing Consumer Interests: The Case of American Health Planning. Ethics 91 (3):431-450.score: 45.0
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  2. Jerome Rothenberg (1991). Consumer Sovereignty and Human Interests, G. Peter Penz. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1986, 256 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 7 (02):322-.score: 36.0
  3. David Palmer & Trevor Hedberg (2013). The Ethics of Marketing to Vulnerable Populations. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):403-413.score: 30.0
    An orthodox view in marketing ethics is that it is morally impermissible to market goods to specially vulnerable populations in ways that take advantage of their vulnerabilities. In his signature article “Marketing and the Vulnerable,” Brenkert (Bus Ethics Q Ruffin Ser 1:7–20, 1998) provided the first substantive defense of this position, one which has become a well-established view in marketing ethics. In what follows, we throw new light on marketing to the vulnerable by critically evaluating key components of Brenkert’s general (...)
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  4. Sandro Castaldo, Francesco Perrini, Nicola Misani & Antonio Tencati (2009). The Missing Link Between Corporate Social Responsibility and Consumer Trust: The Case of Fair Trade Products. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):1 - 15.score: 27.0
    This paper investigates the link between the consumer perception that a company is socially oriented and the consumer intention to buy products marketed by that company. We suggest that this link exists when at least two conditions prevail: (1) the products sold by that company comply with ethical and social requirements; (2) the company has an acknowledged commitment to protect consumer rights and interests. To test these hypotheses, we conducted a survey among the clients of retail (...)
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  5. Danguolė Bublienė (2011). Consumer Right to Information According to the New Proposal for a Directive on Consumer Rights: The Step Forward? Jurisprudence 18 (4):1593-1608.score: 27.0
    The Article analyses how one of the basic consumer rights – the right to information – is regulated in the European Commission Proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on consumer rights (hereinafter referred to as the Proposal): the article analyses trends of regulation of the consumers’ right to receive information; problems related to the scope of provided information and the issue of consumer standard that should be used in evaluating the sufficiency (...)
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  6. Robert Stefanicki (2011). Consumer Protection Against Unfair Commercial Practices in the Light of Directive 2005/29 Concerning Unfair Business-to-Consumer Commercial Practices in the Internal Market. [REVIEW] Jurisprudence 18 (1):69-90.score: 27.0
    The aim of the Directive 2005/29 on unfair commercial practices is to contribute to the proper functioning of the internal market and achieve a high level of consumer protection by way of approximation of the laws, regulations and administrative provisions of Member States relating to the elimination of these practices. As announced to the European Commission’s Green Paper, the Commission felt that the existing regulations in the Member States in that the regard to show significant differences causes legal uncertainty (...)
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  7. Gretchen Larsen & Rob Lawson (2013). Consumer Rights: An Assessment of Justice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (3):515-528.score: 26.0
    For the last 50 years the idea of consumer rights has formed an essential element in the formulation of policy to guide the workings of the marketplace. The extent and coverage of these rights has evolved and changed over time, yet there has been no comprehensive analysis as to the purpose and scope of consumer rights. In moral and ethical philosophy, rights are integrally linked to the notion of justice. By reassessing consumer rights through a justice-based framework, (...)
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  8. Janneke Jonge & Hans C. M. Trijp (2013). Meeting Heterogeneity in Consumer Demand for Animal Welfare: A Reflection on Existing Knowledge and Implications for the Meat Sector. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (3):629-661.score: 23.0
    The legitimacy of the dominant intensive meat production system with respect to the issue of animal welfare is increasingly being questioned by stakeholders across the meat supply chain. The current meat supply is highly undifferentiated, catering only for the extremes of morality concerns (i.e., conventional vs. organic meat products). However, a latent need for compromise products has been identified. That is, consumer differences exist regarding the trade-offs they make between different aspects associated with meat consumption. The heterogeneity in (...) demand could function as a starting point for market segmentation, targeting and positioning regarding animal welfare concepts that are differentiated in terms of animal welfare and price levels. Despite this, stakeholders in the meat supply chain seem to be trapped in the dominant business model focused on low cost prices. This paper aims to identify conflicting interests that stakeholders in the meat supply chain experience in order to increase understanding of why heterogeneous consumer preferences are not met by a more differentiated supply of meat products produced at different levels of animal welfare standards. In addition, characteristics of the supply chain that contribute to the existence of high exit barriers and difficulty to shift to more animal-friendly production systems are identified. Following the analysis of conflicting interests among stakeholders and factors that contribute to difficulty to transform the existing dominant regime, different routes are discussed that may help and motivate stakeholders to overcome these barriers and stimulate the creation of new markets. (shrink)
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  9. Janneke de Jonge & Hans Cm van Trijp (2013). Meeting Heterogeneity in Consumer Demand for Animal Welfare: A Reflection on Existing Knowledge and Implications for the Meat Sector. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (3):629-661.score: 23.0
    The legitimacy of the dominant intensive meat production system with respect to the issue of animal welfare is increasingly being questioned by stakeholders across the meat supply chain. The current meat supply is highly undifferentiated, catering only for the extremes of morality concerns (i.e., conventional vs. organic meat products). However, a latent need for compromise products has been identified. That is, consumer differences exist regarding the trade-offs they make between different aspects associated with meat consumption. The heterogeneity in (...) demand could function as a starting point for market segmentation, targeting and positioning regarding animal welfare concepts that are differentiated in terms of animal welfare and price levels. Despite this, stakeholders in the meat supply chain seem to be trapped in the dominant business model focused on low cost prices. This paper aims to identify conflicting interests that stakeholders in the meat supply chain experience in order to increase understanding of why heterogeneous consumer preferences are not met by a more differentiated supply of meat products produced at different levels of animal welfare standards. In addition, characteristics of the supply chain that contribute to the existence of high exit barriers and difficulty to shift to more animal-friendly production systems are identified. Following the analysis of conflicting interests among stakeholders and factors that contribute to difficulty to transform the existing dominant regime, different routes are discussed that may help and motivate stakeholders to overcome these barriers and stimulate the creation of new markets. (shrink)
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  10. Iris Vermeir & Wim Verbeke (2006). Sustainable Food Consumption: Exploring the Consumer “Attitude – Behavioral Intention” Gap. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (2):169-194.score: 21.0
    Although public interest in sustainability increases and consumer attitudes are mainly positive, behavioral patterns are not univocally consistent with attitudes. This study investigates the presumed gap between favorable attitude towards sustainable behavior and behavioral intention to purchase sustainable food products. The impact of involvement, perceived availability, certainty, perceived consumer effectiveness (PCE), values, and social norms on consumers’ attitudes and intentions towards sustainable food products is analyzed. The empirical research builds on a survey with a sample of 456 young (...)
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  11. Michael Jay Polonsky, Pedro Quelhas Brito, Jorge Pinto & Nicola Higgs-Kleyn (2001). Consumer Ethics in the European Union: A Comparison of Northern and Southern Views. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 31 (2):117 - 130.score: 21.0
    There is a growing interest in understanding consumer ethical actions in relation to their dealings with firms. This paper examines whether there are differences between Northern and Southern European Union (EU) consumers'' perceptions of ethical consumer behaviour using Muncy and Vitell''s (1992) Consumer Ethics Scale (CES). The study samples 962 university students across four Northern EU countries (Germany, Denmark, Scotland, The Netherlands) and four Southern EU countries (Portugal, Spain, Italy, Greece). Some differences are identified between the two (...)
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  12. Kenneth C. Herbst, Sean T. Hannah & David Allan (2013). Advertisement Disclaimer Speed and Corporate Social Responsibility: “Costs” to Consumer Comprehension and Effects on Brand Trust and Purchase Intention. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (2):297-311.score: 21.0
    It is not uncommon for advertisers to present required product disclaimers quickly at the end of advertisements. We show that fast disclaimers greatly reduce consumer comprehension of product risks and benefits, creating implications for social responsibility. In addition, across two studies, we found that disclaimer speed and brand familiarity interact to predict brand trust and purchase intention, and that brand trust mediated the interactive effect of brand familiarity and disclaimer speed on purchase intention. Our results indicate that fast disclaimers (...)
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  13. Anette Lykke Hindhede (2013). Situations of Choice: Configuring the Empowered Consumer of Hearing Technologies. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis:1-17.score: 21.0
    Focusing on the largest and, arguably, the least visible disability group, the hearing impaired, this paper explores present-day views and understandings of hearing impairment and rehabilitation in a Danish context, with particular focus on working-age adults with late onset of hearing impairment. The paper shows how recent changes in perception of the hearing impaired patient relate to the introduction of a new health care reform that turns audiological rehabilitation into a consumer issue. Ethnographic and interview data from hearing clinics (...)
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  14. Charles B. Inlander & Lois V. Backus (1987). Consumers, Physicians, and Payors: A Triad of Conflicting Interests. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 8 (1).score: 21.0
    The dynamic changes in American health care are significiantly deeper than technological advancement alone. Consumers, physicians, and third party payors are all assuming new roles in the system. The balance of medical control is radically shifting. Unless the three parties come together in a mutual partnership, needed improvements will not occur and what is currently good in the system will be lost. The key to this important partnership is the consumer.
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  15. Sergio Román (2010). Relational Consequences of Perceived Deception in Online Shopping: The Moderating Roles of Type of Product, Consumer's Attitude Toward the Internet and Consumer's Demographics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):373 - 391.score: 21.0
    This study investigates the negative influence of consumer's perceptions of online retailer's deceptive practices (perceived deception) on consumer's relational variables (satisfaction and loyalty intentions to the online retailer). Also, the moderating role of product type (goods versus services), consumer's attitude toward the Internet, and consumer's demographics in the deception-relational outcomes link is considered. Data from 398 online consumers revealed that satisfaction totally mediated the influence of deception on loyalty. Furthermore, the deception-satisfaction link was moderated by all (...)
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  16. Filiep Vanhonacker & Wim Verbeke (2014). Public and Consumer Policies for Higher Welfare Food Products: Challenges and Opportunities. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (1):153-171.score: 21.0
    Farm animal welfare in livestock production is a topical and important issue attracting growing interest of policy makers, consumers, stakeholders in the supply chain and others. While there is much public interest in the issue this is not reflected in the supply and market shares of animal food products that are produced under welfare standards that exceed legislative requirements. Given the obstacles to devising stricter legislative standards, higher welfare animal food products are mostly made available through market-based approaches. This paper (...)
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  17. Ken W. Belcher, Andrea E. Germann & Josef K. Schmutz (2007). Beef with Environmental and Quality Attributes: Preferences of Environmental Group and General Population Consumers in Saskatchewan, Canada. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 24 (3):333-342.score: 21.0
    We attempt to quantify and qualify the preferences of consumers for beef with a number of environmental and food quality attributes. Our goal is to evaluate the viability of a proposed food co-operative based in the Wood River watershed of southern Saskatchewan, Canada. The food co-operative was designed to provide a price premium to producers who adopted alternative management practices. In addition, the study evaluated the acceptance of a proposed food co-operative by consumer that had environmental interests as (...)
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  18. Cornelius A. Eller (1952). The Consumer Interest. Thought 27 (2):280-281.score: 21.0
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  19. Peter Jackson (1995). Processes of Persuasion: Social Interests and Total Quality in a UK Hospital Trust. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 3 (4):283-289.score: 21.0
    This paper examines some of the processes which have contributed to the development of a ‘total quality’ (TQ) approach within British health care. The paper challenges the idea that TQ is part of a redistribution of power within the NHS. Rather it is argued that through the elaboration of consumer-led market identities TQ misrepresents the interests of management and constructs a version of the self which obscures new forms of management control. TQ constrains alternative forms of social organisation, (...)
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  20. Jaywant Singh, Maria del Mar Garcia de los Salmones Sanchez & Igancio Rodriguez del Bosque (2008). Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility and Product Perceptions in Consumer Markets: A Cross-Cultural Evaluation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (3):597-611.score: 21.0
    The concept of corporate social responsibility is becoming integral to effective corporate brand management. This study adopts a multidimensional and cross-country perspective of the concept and analyses consumer perceptions of behaviour of four leading consumer products manufacturers. Data was collected from consumers in two countries – Spain and the UK. The study analyses consumers’ degree of interest in corporate responsibility and its impact on their perception about the company. The findings here suggest a weak impact of company-specific communication (...)
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  21. Ella Pagliarini, Monica Laureati & Davide Gaeta (2013). Sensory Descriptors, Hedonic Perception and Consumer's Attitudes to Sangiovese Red Wine Deriving From Organically and Conventionally Grown Grapes. Frontiers in Psychology 4:896.score: 19.0
    In recent years, produce obtained from organic farming methods (i.e. a system that minimizes pollution and avoids the use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides) has rapidly increased in developed countries. This may be explained by the fact that organic food meets the standard requirements for quality and healthiness. Among organic products, wine has greatly attracted the interest of the consumers. In the present study, trained assessors and regular wine consumers were respectively required to identify the sensory properties (e.g. odor, taste, (...)
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  22. Tanya L. Chartrand (2005). The Role of Conscious Awareness in Consumer Behavior. Journal of Consumer Psychology 15 (3):203-210.score: 18.0
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  23. Julia Tanner (2007). Can Animals Have Preference-Interests? Ethic@ 6 (1).score: 18.0
    It has been argued that only moral agents can have preference-interests and this therefore excludes animals. I will present two objections to this argument. The first will show that moral agency is not necessary to have preference-interests. The second will assert that the argument that animals cannot have preference-interests has unwelcome consequences.
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  24. Scott J. Reynolds, Frank C. Schultz & David R. Hekman (2006). Stakeholder Theory and Managerial Decision-Making: Constraints and Implications of Balancing Stakeholder Interests. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 64 (3):285 - 301.score: 18.0
    Stakeholder theory is widely recognized as a management theory, yet very little research has considered its implications for individual managerial decision-making. In the two studies reported here, we used stakeholder theory to examine managerial decisions about balancing stakeholder interests. Results of Study 1 suggest that indivisible resources and unequal levels of stakeholder saliency constrain managers’ efforts to balance stakeholder interests. Resource divisibility also influenced whether managers used a within-decision or an across-decision approach to balance stakeholder interests. In (...)
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  25. Yves Gingras & Pierre-Marc Gosselin (2008). The Emergence and Evolution of the Expression “Conflict of Interests” in Science : A Historical Overview, 1880–2006. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (3):337-343.score: 18.0
    The tendency is strong to take the notion of “conflict of interests” for granted as if it had an invariant meaning and an ethical content independent of the historical context. It is doubtful however, from an historical and sociological point of view, that many of the cases now considered as instances of “conflicts of interests” would also have been conceived and perceived as such in, say, the 1930s. The idea of a “conflict of interests” presupposes that there (...)
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  26. Itamar Simonson (2005). In Defense of Consciousness: The Role of Conscious and Unconscious Inputs in Consumer Choice. Journal of Consumer Psychology 15 (3):211-217.score: 18.0
  27. Johannes Brinkmann (2004). Looking at Consumer Behavior in a Moral Perspective. Journal of Business Ethics 51 (2):129-141.score: 18.0
    The paper suggests that consumers and their behaviors deserve (much) more attention in our field. After a few website references (about ethical shopping and ethical trade initiatives) and after a brief literature review of recent business ethics and consumer behavior literature conceptual frameworks are suggested. As an open end, the paper contains some empirical references, related to consumer honesty, tax loyalty and to motives for buying organic food, and suggests the development of a consumer morality measurement instrument.
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  28. Longinos Marin, Salvador Ruiz & Alicia Rubio (2009). The Role of Identity Salience in the Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility on Consumer Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):65 - 78.score: 18.0
    Based on the assumption that consumers will reward firms for their support of social programs, many organizations have adopted corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices. Drawing on social identity theory, a model of influence of CSR on loyalty is developed and tested using a sample of real consumers. Results demonstrate that CSR initiatives are linked to stronger loyalty both because the consumer develops a more positive company evaluation, and because one identifies more strongly with the company. Moreover, identity salience is (...)
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  29. Scott J. Vitell & James Muncy (2005). The Muncy–Vitell Consumer Ethics Scale: A Modification and Application. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):267 - 275.score: 18.0
    This study compares college students with other adults in terms of the Muncy–Vitell (1992) consumer ethics scale. Further, the study updates the Muncy–Vitell consumer ethics scale with modifications that include rewording and the addition of new items. These new items can be grouped into three distinct categories – (1) downloading/buying counterfeit goods, (2) recycling/environmental awareness and (3) doing the right thing/doing good. The study also compares these two groups in terms of their attitude toward business. Results show that (...)
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  30. Cheryl Berg & Kelly Fryer-Edwards (2008). The Ethical Challenges of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (1):17 - 31.score: 18.0
    Genetic testing is currently subject to little oversight, despite the significant ethical issues involved. Repeated recommendations for increased regulation of the genetic testing market have led to little progress in the policy arena. A 2005 Internet search identified 13 websites offering health-related genetic testing for direct purchase by the consumer. Further examination of these sites showed that overall, biotech companies are not providing enough information for consumers to make well-informed decisions; they are not consistently offering genetic counseling services; and (...)
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  31. Pepijn K. C. van de Pol & Frank G. A. de Bakker (2010). Direct-to-Consumer Advertising of Pharmaceuticals as a Matter of Corporate Social Responsibility? Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):211-224.score: 18.0
    Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription drugs has been a heavily contested issue over the past decade, touching on several issues of responsibility facing the pharmaceutical industry. Much research has been conducted on DTCA, but hardly any studies have discussed this topic from a corporate social responsibility (CSR) perspective. In this article, we use several elements of CSR, emphasising consumer autonomy and safety, to analyse differences in DTCA practices within two different policy contexts, the United States of America and (...)
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  32. R. Stephen Parker & Charles E. Pettijohn (2003). Ethical Considerations in the Use of Direct-to-Consumer Advertising and Pharmaceutical Promotions: The Impact on Pharmaceutical Sales and Physicians. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (3):279-290.score: 18.0
    The influence of direct-to-consumer advertising and physician promotions are examined in this study. We further examine some of the ethical issues which may arise when physicians accept promotional products from pharmaceutical companies. The data revealed that direct-to-consumer advertising is likely to increase the request rates of both the drug category and the drug brand choices, as well as the likelihood that those drugs will be prescribed by physicians. The data further revealed that the majority of responding physicians were (...)
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  33. Scott J. Vitell (2009). The Role of Religiosity in Business and Consumer Ethics: A Review of the Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):155 - 167.score: 18.0
    In 1949 Culliton noted that "... religion has something to offer business" (Culliton, 1949, p. 265). While religion definitely does have something to offer business, especially business ethics, it is only recently that empirical research linking religiosity and business ethics has been conducted. Indeed, religiosity affords a background, against which the ethical nature of business, including marketing and consumer behavior, can be interpreted. This article offers a descriptive, rather than normative, perspective in reviewing articles linking religion to business and (...)
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  34. Volkert Beekman (2008). Consumer Rights to Informed Choice on the Food Market. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (1):61 - 72.score: 18.0
    The discourse about traceability in food chains focused on traceability as means towards the end of managing health risks. This discourse witnessed a call to broaden traceability to accommodate consumer concerns about foods that are not related to health. This call envisions the development of ethical traceability. This paper presents a justification of ethical traceability. The argument is couched in liberal distinctions, since the call for ethical traceability is based on intuitions about consumer rights to informed choice. The (...)
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  35. Richard F. Beltramini (2006). Consumer Believability of Information in Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) Advertising of Prescription Drugs. Journal of Business Ethics 63 (4):333 - 343.score: 18.0
    Direct to consumer (DTC) advertising has attracted significant research attention, yet none has focused on empirical assessments of its overall impact on U.S. consumers nationally, and tying assessment to relevant behavioral outcomes. This paper addresses the ethical issue of DTC advertising providing a balance of product and risk information that is both understandable and believable, and contributes direction to those exploring this phenomenon.
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  36. Aaron Simmons (2012). Do Embryos Have Interests? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):57-66.score: 18.0
    Are embryos deserving of moral consideration in our actions? A standard view suggests that embryos are considerable only if they have interests. One argument for embryonic interests contends that embryos are harmed by death because they are deprived of valuable future lives as adult persons. Some have challenged this argument on the grounds that embryos aren’t identical to adults: either due to the potential for embryos to twin or because we do not exist until the fetus develops consciousness. (...)
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  37. Lucas Introna & Athanasia Pouloudi (1999). Privacy in the Information Age: Stakeholders, Interests and Values. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 22 (1):27 - 38.score: 18.0
    Privacy is a relational and relative concept that has been defined in a variety of ways. In this paper we offer a systematic discussion of potentially different notions of privacy. We conclude that privacy as the freedom or immunity from the judgement of others is an extremely useful concept to develop ways in which to understand privacy claims and associated risks. To this end, we develop a framework of principles that explores the interrelations of interests and values for various (...)
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  38. Erik de Bakker & Hans Dagevos (2012). Reducing Meat Consumption in Today's Consumer Society: Questioning the Citizen-Consumer Gap. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):877-894.score: 18.0
    Abstract Our growing demand for meat and dairy food products is unsustainable. It is hard to imagine that this global issue can be solved solely by more efficient technologies. Lowering our meat consumption seems inescapable. Yet, the question is whether modern consumers can be considered as reliable allies to achieve this shift in meat consumption pattern. Is there not a yawning gap between our responsible intentions as citizens and our hedonic desires as consumers? We will argue that consumers can and (...)
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  39. Jeri Lynn Jones & Karen L. Middleton (2007). Ethical Decision-Making by Consumers: The Roles of Product Harm and Consumer Vulnerability. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):247 - 264.score: 18.0
    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effects of perceptions of product harm and consumer vulnerability on ethical evaluations of target marketing strategies. We first established whether subjects are able to accurately judge the harmfulness of a product through labeling alone, and whether they could differentiate consumers who were more or less vulnerable. The results suggest that without the presence of a prime, subjects who depended on implicit memory or guess were able to detect differences in (...)
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  40. Frans W. A. Brom (2000). Food, Consumer Concerns, and Trust: Food Ethics for a Globalizing Market. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 12 (2):127-139.score: 18.0
    The use of biotechnology in food productiongives rise to consumer concerns. The term ``consumerconcern'' is often used as a container notion. Itincludes concerns about food safety, environmental andanimal welfare consequences of food productionsystems, and intrinsic moral objections againstgenetic modification. In order to create clarity adistinction between three different kinds of consumerconcern is proposed. Consumer concerns can be seen assigns of loss of trust. Maintaining consumer trustasks for governmental action. Towards consumerconcerns, governments seem to have limitedpossibilities for public (...)
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  41. Pola B. Gupta, Stephen J. Gould & Bharath Pola (2004). “To Pirate or Not to Pirate”: A Comparative Study of the Ethical Versus Other Influences on the Consumer's Software Acquisition-Mode Decision. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 55 (3):255 - 274.score: 18.0
    Consumers of software often face an acquisition-mode decision, namely whether to purchase or pirate that software. In terms of consumer welfare, consumers who pirate software may stand in opposition to those who purchase it. Marketers also face a decision whether to attempt to thwart that piracy or to ignore, if not encourage it as an aid to their softwares diffusion, and policymakers face the decision whether to adopt interventionist policies, which are government-centric, or laissez faire policies, which are marketer-centric. (...)
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  42. Scott J. Vitell (2003). Consumer Ethics Research: Review, Synthesis and Suggestions for the Future. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):33 - 47.score: 18.0
    This manuscript reviews and synthesizes most of the major research studies in the area of consumer ethics that have appeared since 1990. It examines both conceptual and empirical works with an objective of encouraging researchers to pursue research in the consumer ethics area. Toward this end, the paper also suggests directions for future research.
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  43. Justin Tan & Anna E. Tan (2009). Managing Public Relations in an Emerging Economy: The Case of Mercedes in China. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):257 - 266.score: 18.0
    This case study documents a high-profile incident involving the world-famous auto maker Daimler Benz with its customers in China. On the one hand, angry customers felt victimized by the auto maker's lack of willingness to take responsibility and its double standard between industrialized markets and emerging economies in dealing with customer complaints; on the other hand, the auto maker also felt frustrated at how this product warranty matter quickly escalated into a public relations nightmare. The case illustrates the complexity of (...)
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  44. Wim A. J. Verbeke & Jacques Viaene (2000). Ethical Challenges for Livestock Production:Meeting Consumer Concerns About Meat Safety and Animalwelfare. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 12 (2):141-151.score: 18.0
    Livestock production today faces thedifficult task of effectively meeting emergingconsumer concerns while remaining competitive on majortarget markets. Meeting consumer concerns aboutproduct safety and animal welfare are identified askey attention points for future livestock production.The relevance of these issues pertains to productionefficiency and economic benefits and tore-establishing meat sector image and consumer trust.The current paper analyses consumer concerns about theethical issues of meat safety and animal welfare fromcurrent livestock production. The research methodologyis based on literature review, secondary data (...)
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  45. John Tsalikis & Bruce Seaton (2006). Business Ethics Index: Measuring Consumer Sentiments Toward Business Ethical Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 64 (4):317 - 326.score: 18.0
    The present study describes the development of an ongoing and systematic index to measure consumers’ sentiments towards business ethical practices. The Business Ethics Index (BEI) is based on the well established measurements of consumer sentiments, namely the ICS (Index of Consumer Sentiment) and CBCCI (Conference Board Consumer Confidence Index). The BEI is comprised of 4 measurements representing the dimensions of “personal-vicarious” and “past-future.” Data from 503 telephone interviews were used to calculate a BEI of 107. This indicates (...)
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  46. Michiel Korthals (2001). Taking Consumers Seriously: Two Concepts of Consumer Sovereignty. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (2):201-215.score: 18.0
    Governments, producers, and international free tradeorganizations like the World Trade Organization (WTO) areincreasingly confronted with consumers who not only buy (or don''tbuy) goods, but also demand that those goods are producedconforming to certain ethical (often diverse) standards. Not onlysafety and health belong to these ethical ideals, but animalwelfare, environmental concerns, labor circumstances, and fairtrade. However, this phantom haunts the dusty world of social andpolitical philosophy as well. The new concept ``consumersovereignty'''' bypasses the conceptual dichotomy of consumer andcitizen.According to the (...)
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  47. Zhiqiang Liu, Fue Zeng & Chenting Su (2009). Does Relationship Quality Matter in Consumer Ethical Decision Making? Evidence From China. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):483 - 496.score: 18.0
    This study explores the linear logic between consumer ethical beliefs (CEBs) and consumer unethical behavior (CUB) in a Chinese context. A relational view helps fill the belief–behavior gap by exploring the moderating role of relationship quality in reducing CUBs. Specifically, when consumers are more receptive to a set of actions that may be deemed inappropriate by moral principles, they are more likely to engage in unethical behaviors. However, when consumers perceive their misconduct as possibly damaging to the relationship (...)
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  48. Aaron Simmons (2010). Two Arguments Against Biological Interests. Environmental Ethics 32 (3):229-245.score: 18.0
    In both environmental ethics and bioethics, one central issue is the range of entities that are morally considerable. According to one view on this issue, we ought to extend consideration to any entity that possesses interests. But what kinds of entities possess interests? Some philosophers have argued that only sentient beings can have interests, while others have held that all living organisms possess interests in the fulfillment of their biological functions. Is it true that all living (...)
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  49. Armand H. Matheny Antommaria (2008). Adjudicating Rights or Analyzing Interests: Ethicists' Role in the Debate Over Conscience in Clinical Practice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):201-212.score: 18.0
    The analysis of a dispute can focus on either interests, rights, or power. Commentators often frame the conflict over conscience in clinical practice as a dispute between a patient’s right to legally available medical treatment and a clinician’s right to refuse to provide interventions the clinician finds morally objectionable. Multiple sources of unresolvable moral disagreement make resolution in these terms unlikely. One should instead focus on the parties’ interests and the different ways in which the health care delivery (...)
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  50. Mark D. Groza, Mya R. Pronschinske & Matthew Walker (2011). Perceived Organizational Motives and Consumer Responses to Proactive and Reactive CSR. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (4):639-652.score: 18.0
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has emerged as an effective way for firms to create favorable attitudes among consumers. Although prior research has addressed the direct influence of proactive and reactive CSR on consumer responses, this research hypothesized that consumers’ perceived organizational motives (i.e., attributions) will mediate this relationship. It was also hypothesized that the source of information and location of CSR initiative will affect the motives consumers assign to a firms’ engagement in the initiative. Two experiments were conducted to (...)
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