Search results for 'Consumer Interests' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. James A. Morone & Theodore R. Marmor (1981). Representing Consumer Interests: The Case of American Health Planning. Ethics 91 (3):431-450.score: 90.0
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  2. Jerome Rothenberg (1991). Consumer Sovereignty and Human Interests, G. Peter Penz. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1986, 256 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 7 (02):322-.score: 72.0
  3. David Palmer & Trevor Hedberg (2013). The Ethics of Marketing to Vulnerable Populations. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):403-413.score: 60.0
    An orthodox view in marketing ethics is that it is morally impermissible to market goods to specially vulnerable populations in ways that take advantage of their vulnerabilities. In his signature article “Marketing and the Vulnerable,” Brenkert (Bus Ethics Q Ruffin Ser 1:7–20, 1998) provided the first substantive defense of this position, one which has become a well-established view in marketing ethics. In what follows, we throw new light on marketing to the vulnerable by critically evaluating key components of Brenkert’s general (...)
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  4. Sandro Castaldo, Francesco Perrini, Nicola Misani & Antonio Tencati (2009). The Missing Link Between Corporate Social Responsibility and Consumer Trust: The Case of Fair Trade Products. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):1 - 15.score: 54.0
    This paper investigates the link between the consumer perception that a company is socially oriented and the consumer intention to buy products marketed by that company. We suggest that this link exists when at least two conditions prevail: (1) the products sold by that company comply with ethical and social requirements; (2) the company has an acknowledged commitment to protect consumer rights and interests. To test these hypotheses, we conducted a survey among the clients of retail (...)
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  5. Danguolė Bublienė (2011). Consumer Right to Information According to the New Proposal for a Directive on Consumer Rights: The Step Forward? Jurisprudence 18 (4):1593-1608.score: 54.0
    The Article analyses how one of the basic consumer rights – the right to information – is regulated in the European Commission Proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on consumer rights (hereinafter referred to as the Proposal): the article analyses trends of regulation of the consumers’ right to receive information; problems related to the scope of provided information and the issue of consumer standard that should be used in evaluating the sufficiency (...)
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  6. Robert Stefanicki (2011). Consumer Protection Against Unfair Commercial Practices in the Light of Directive 2005/29 Concerning Unfair Business-to-Consumer Commercial Practices in the Internal Market. [REVIEW] Jurisprudence 18 (1):69-90.score: 54.0
    The aim of the Directive 2005/29 on unfair commercial practices is to contribute to the proper functioning of the internal market and achieve a high level of consumer protection by way of approximation of the laws, regulations and administrative provisions of Member States relating to the elimination of these practices. As announced to the European Commission’s Green Paper, the Commission felt that the existing regulations in the Member States in that the regard to show significant differences causes legal uncertainty (...)
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  7. Janneke Jonge & Hans C. M. Trijp (2013). Meeting Heterogeneity in Consumer Demand for Animal Welfare: A Reflection on Existing Knowledge and Implications for the Meat Sector. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (3):629-661.score: 46.0
    The legitimacy of the dominant intensive meat production system with respect to the issue of animal welfare is increasingly being questioned by stakeholders across the meat supply chain. The current meat supply is highly undifferentiated, catering only for the extremes of morality concerns (i.e., conventional vs. organic meat products). However, a latent need for compromise products has been identified. That is, consumer differences exist regarding the trade-offs they make between different aspects associated with meat consumption. The heterogeneity in (...) demand could function as a starting point for market segmentation, targeting and positioning regarding animal welfare concepts that are differentiated in terms of animal welfare and price levels. Despite this, stakeholders in the meat supply chain seem to be trapped in the dominant business model focused on low cost prices. This paper aims to identify conflicting interests that stakeholders in the meat supply chain experience in order to increase understanding of why heterogeneous consumer preferences are not met by a more differentiated supply of meat products produced at different levels of animal welfare standards. In addition, characteristics of the supply chain that contribute to the existence of high exit barriers and difficulty to shift to more animal-friendly production systems are identified. Following the analysis of conflicting interests among stakeholders and factors that contribute to difficulty to transform the existing dominant regime, different routes are discussed that may help and motivate stakeholders to overcome these barriers and stimulate the creation of new markets. (shrink)
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  8. Janneke de Jonge & Hans Cm van Trijp (2013). Meeting Heterogeneity in Consumer Demand for Animal Welfare: A Reflection on Existing Knowledge and Implications for the Meat Sector. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (3):629-661.score: 46.0
    The legitimacy of the dominant intensive meat production system with respect to the issue of animal welfare is increasingly being questioned by stakeholders across the meat supply chain. The current meat supply is highly undifferentiated, catering only for the extremes of morality concerns (i.e., conventional vs. organic meat products). However, a latent need for compromise products has been identified. That is, consumer differences exist regarding the trade-offs they make between different aspects associated with meat consumption. The heterogeneity in (...) demand could function as a starting point for market segmentation, targeting and positioning regarding animal welfare concepts that are differentiated in terms of animal welfare and price levels. Despite this, stakeholders in the meat supply chain seem to be trapped in the dominant business model focused on low cost prices. This paper aims to identify conflicting interests that stakeholders in the meat supply chain experience in order to increase understanding of why heterogeneous consumer preferences are not met by a more differentiated supply of meat products produced at different levels of animal welfare standards. In addition, characteristics of the supply chain that contribute to the existence of high exit barriers and difficulty to shift to more animal-friendly production systems are identified. Following the analysis of conflicting interests among stakeholders and factors that contribute to difficulty to transform the existing dominant regime, different routes are discussed that may help and motivate stakeholders to overcome these barriers and stimulate the creation of new markets. (shrink)
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  9. Kenneth C. Herbst, Sean T. Hannah & David Allan (2013). Advertisement Disclaimer Speed and Corporate Social Responsibility: “Costs” to Consumer Comprehension and Effects on Brand Trust and Purchase Intention. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (2):297-311.score: 42.0
    It is not uncommon for advertisers to present required product disclaimers quickly at the end of advertisements. We show that fast disclaimers greatly reduce consumer comprehension of product risks and benefits, creating implications for social responsibility. In addition, across two studies, we found that disclaimer speed and brand familiarity interact to predict brand trust and purchase intention, and that brand trust mediated the interactive effect of brand familiarity and disclaimer speed on purchase intention. Our results indicate that fast disclaimers (...)
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  10. Anette Lykke Hindhede (2013). Situations of Choice: Configuring the Empowered Consumer of Hearing Technologies. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis:1-17.score: 42.0
    Focusing on the largest and, arguably, the least visible disability group, the hearing impaired, this paper explores present-day views and understandings of hearing impairment and rehabilitation in a Danish context, with particular focus on working-age adults with late onset of hearing impairment. The paper shows how recent changes in perception of the hearing impaired patient relate to the introduction of a new health care reform that turns audiological rehabilitation into a consumer issue. Ethnographic and interview data from hearing clinics (...)
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  11. Charles B. Inlander & Lois V. Backus (1987). Consumers, Physicians, and Payors: A Triad of Conflicting Interests. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 8 (1).score: 42.0
    The dynamic changes in American health care are significiantly deeper than technological advancement alone. Consumers, physicians, and third party payors are all assuming new roles in the system. The balance of medical control is radically shifting. Unless the three parties come together in a mutual partnership, needed improvements will not occur and what is currently good in the system will be lost. The key to this important partnership is the consumer.
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  12. Ken W. Belcher, Andrea E. Germann & Josef K. Schmutz (2007). Beef with Environmental and Quality Attributes: Preferences of Environmental Group and General Population Consumers in Saskatchewan, Canada. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 24 (3):333-342.score: 42.0
    We attempt to quantify and qualify the preferences of consumers for beef with a number of environmental and food quality attributes. Our goal is to evaluate the viability of a proposed food co-operative based in the Wood River watershed of southern Saskatchewan, Canada. The food co-operative was designed to provide a price premium to producers who adopted alternative management practices. In addition, the study evaluated the acceptance of a proposed food co-operative by consumer that had environmental interests as (...)
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  13. Peter Jackson (1995). Processes of Persuasion: Social Interests and Total Quality in a UK Hospital Trust. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 3 (4):283-289.score: 42.0
    This paper examines some of the processes which have contributed to the development of a ‘total quality’ (TQ) approach within British health care. The paper challenges the idea that TQ is part of a redistribution of power within the NHS. Rather it is argued that through the elaboration of consumer-led market identities TQ misrepresents the interests of management and constructs a version of the self which obscures new forms of management control. TQ constrains alternative forms of social organisation, (...)
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  14. Gretchen Larsen & Rob Lawson (2013). Consumer Rights: An Assessment of Justice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (3):515-528.score: 40.0
    For the last 50 years the idea of consumer rights has formed an essential element in the formulation of policy to guide the workings of the marketplace. The extent and coverage of these rights has evolved and changed over time, yet there has been no comprehensive analysis as to the purpose and scope of consumer rights. In moral and ethical philosophy, rights are integrally linked to the notion of justice. By reassessing consumer rights through a justice-based framework, (...)
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  15. Justin Tan & Anna E. Tan (2009). Managing Public Relations in an Emerging Economy: The Case of Mercedes in China. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):257 - 266.score: 36.0
    This case study documents a high-profile incident involving the world-famous auto maker Daimler Benz with its customers in China. On the one hand, angry customers felt victimized by the auto maker's lack of willingness to take responsibility and its double standard between industrialized markets and emerging economies in dealing with customer complaints; on the other hand, the auto maker also felt frustrated at how this product warranty matter quickly escalated into a public relations nightmare. The case illustrates the complexity of (...)
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  16. H. Schmidt & S. Callier (2012). How Anonymous is 'Anonymous'? Some Suggestions Towards a Coherent Universal Coding System for Genetic Samples. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (5):304-309.score: 36.0
    So-called ‘anonymous’ tissue samples are widely used in research. Because they lack externally identifying information, they are viewed as useful in reconciling conflicts between the control, privacy and confidentiality interests of those from whom the samples originated and the public (or commercial) interest in carrying out research, as reflected in ‘consent or anonymise’ policies. High level guidance documents suggest that withdrawal of consent and samples and the provision of feedback are impossible in the case of anonymous samples. In view (...)
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  17. Chris M. Bell & Kelley J. Main (2011). Deonance and Distrust: Motivated Third Party Information Seeking Following Disclosure of an Agent's Unethical Behavior. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):77-96.score: 36.0
    This article explores the hypothesis that third parties are motivated to seek information about agents who have behaved unethically in the past, even if the agent and available information are irrelevant to the third parties’ goals and interests. We explored two possible motives for this information seeking behavior: deonance, or the motive to care about ethics and justice simply for the sake of ethics and justice, and distrust-based threat monitoring. Participants in a consumer decision task were found to (...)
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  18. Cornelius A. Eller (1952). The Consumer Interest. Thought 27 (2):280-281.score: 36.0
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  19. Paula Fitzgerald Bone & Robert J. Corey (2000). Packaging Ethics: Perceptual Differences Among Packaging Professionals, Brand Managers and Ethically-Interested Consumers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 24 (3):199 - 213.score: 32.0
    In this article, we explore ethical perceptions of three product packaging issues as viewed by packaging professionals, brand managers, and ethically-interested consumers. We examine, differences between business practitioners and consumers with respect to ethical sensitivity, perceived consequences of business practices, and perceived industry norms. Additionally, we explore the prevalence of two types of values, pragmatic and moral, to determine if the use of these value-types differs among the three groups. We find that business practitioners exhibit less ethical sensitivity. Businesspeople also (...)
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  20. Iris Vermeir & Wim Verbeke (2006). Sustainable Food Consumption: Exploring the Consumer “Attitude – Behavioral Intention” Gap. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (2):169-194.score: 30.0
    Although public interest in sustainability increases and consumer attitudes are mainly positive, behavioral patterns are not univocally consistent with attitudes. This study investigates the presumed gap between favorable attitude towards sustainable behavior and behavioral intention to purchase sustainable food products. The impact of involvement, perceived availability, certainty, perceived consumer effectiveness (PCE), values, and social norms on consumers’ attitudes and intentions towards sustainable food products is analyzed. The empirical research builds on a survey with a sample of 456 young (...)
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  21. Elise Smith, Jason Behrmann, Carolina Martin & Bryn Williams-jones (2010). Reproductive Tourism in Argentina: Clinic Accreditation and its Implications for Consumers, Health Professionals and Policy Makers. Developing World Bioethics 10 (2):59-69.score: 30.0
    A subcategory of medical tourism, reproductive tourism has been the subject of much public and policy debate in recent years. Specific concerns include: the exploitation of individuals and communities, access to needed health care services, fair allocation of limited resources, and the quality and safety of services provided by private clinics. To date, the focus of attention has been on the thriving medical and reproductive tourism sectors in Asia and Eastern Europe; there has been much less consideration given to more (...)
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  22. Michael Jay Polonsky, Pedro Quelhas Brito, Jorge Pinto & Nicola Higgs-Kleyn (2001). Consumer Ethics in the European Union: A Comparison of Northern and Southern Views. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 31 (2):117 - 130.score: 30.0
    There is a growing interest in understanding consumer ethical actions in relation to their dealings with firms. This paper examines whether there are differences between Northern and Southern European Union (EU) consumers'' perceptions of ethical consumer behaviour using Muncy and Vitell''s (1992) Consumer Ethics Scale (CES). The study samples 962 university students across four Northern EU countries (Germany, Denmark, Scotland, The Netherlands) and four Southern EU countries (Portugal, Spain, Italy, Greece). Some differences are identified between the two (...)
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  23. Shaheen Borna (1989). Illegal Products and the Question of Consumer Redress. Journal of Business Ethics 8 (6):499 - 505.score: 30.0
    Despite the enormous size of the illicit market in the United States, there is a paucity of research concerning the rights of consumers of illegal products. In this article it is argued that the illicit nature of a transaction should not deny consumers the right to safety and redress. Recognition of these rights is not only in line with the public policy goal, i.e., protecting public interests, but it can also serve as a deterrent factor for the sales of (...)
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  24. Sergio Román (2010). Relational Consequences of Perceived Deception in Online Shopping: The Moderating Roles of Type of Product, Consumer's Attitude Toward the Internet and Consumer's Demographics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):373 - 391.score: 30.0
    This study investigates the negative influence of consumer's perceptions of online retailer's deceptive practices (perceived deception) on consumer's relational variables (satisfaction and loyalty intentions to the online retailer). Also, the moderating role of product type (goods versus services), consumer's attitude toward the Internet, and consumer's demographics in the deception-relational outcomes link is considered. Data from 398 online consumers revealed that satisfaction totally mediated the influence of deception on loyalty. Furthermore, the deception-satisfaction link was moderated by all (...)
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  25. Thomas A. Hemphill (2007). The US Securities and Exchange Commission and Shareholder Director Nominations: Paving the Way for Special Interest Directors? International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 3 (1):19-32.score: 30.0
    The US Securities and Exchange Commission recently proposed rules relating to shareholder (independent) director nominations to publicly-traded companies. While shareholder groups, such as institutional investors, consumer groups, and shareholder activists, generally support the proxy reform, the business community, including The Business Roundtable and the US Chamber of Commerce, are critical of the proposal, arguing that it will 'open the door' to special interest directors, e.g., labour unions or other groups having a social or political agenda contrary to the economic (...)
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  26. Filiep Vanhonacker & Wim Verbeke (2014). Public and Consumer Policies for Higher Welfare Food Products: Challenges and Opportunities. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (1):153-171.score: 30.0
    Farm animal welfare in livestock production is a topical and important issue attracting growing interest of policy makers, consumers, stakeholders in the supply chain and others. While there is much public interest in the issue this is not reflected in the supply and market shares of animal food products that are produced under welfare standards that exceed legislative requirements. Given the obstacles to devising stricter legislative standards, higher welfare animal food products are mostly made available through market-based approaches. This paper (...)
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  27. Peter Vincent-Jones (2000). Contractual Governance: Institutional and Organizational Analysis. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 20 (3):317-351.score: 30.0
    This paper focuses on the role of contract as a governance mechanism in contemporary economic and social relations, exploring this theme in the context of recent writing on contract and contracting within law and other disciplines. The trends towards both outsourcing by private firms and privatization of public services have increased the importance of contract as an instrument of market and quasi-market exchange. Such organizational developments have been accompanied by institutional changes in the way in which business relationships are regulated (...)
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  28. Jaywant Singh, Maria del Mar Garcia de los Salmones Sanchez & Igancio Rodriguez del Bosque (2008). Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility and Product Perceptions in Consumer Markets: A Cross-Cultural Evaluation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (3):597-611.score: 30.0
    The concept of corporate social responsibility is becoming integral to effective corporate brand management. This study adopts a multidimensional and cross-country perspective of the concept and analyses consumer perceptions of behaviour of four leading consumer products manufacturers. Data was collected from consumers in two countries – Spain and the UK. The study analyses consumers’ degree of interest in corporate responsibility and its impact on their perception about the company. The findings here suggest a weak impact of company-specific communication (...)
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  29. Ella Pagliarini, Monica Laureati & Davide Gaeta (2013). Sensory Descriptors, Hedonic Perception and Consumer's Attitudes to Sangiovese Red Wine Deriving From Organically and Conventionally Grown Grapes. Frontiers in Psychology 4:896.score: 28.0
    In recent years, produce obtained from organic farming methods (i.e. a system that minimizes pollution and avoids the use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides) has rapidly increased in developed countries. This may be explained by the fact that organic food meets the standard requirements for quality and healthiness. Among organic products, wine has greatly attracted the interest of the consumers. In the present study, trained assessors and regular wine consumers were respectively required to identify the sensory properties (e.g. odor, taste, (...)
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  30. Marcia Dutra de Barcellos, Klaus G. Grunert, Yanfeng Zhou, Wim Verbeke, F. J. A. Perez-Cueto & Athanasios Krystallis (2013). Consumer Attitudes to Different Pig Production Systems: A Study From Mainland China. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):443-455.score: 26.0
    In many countries consumers have shown an increasing interest to the way in which food products are being produced. This study investigates Chinese consumers’ attitudes towards different pig production systems by means of a conjoint analysis. While there has been a range of studies on Western consumers’ attitudes to various forms of food production, little is known about the level of Chinese consumers’ attitudes. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 472 participants in 6 Chinese cities. Results indicate that Chinese (...)
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  31. Josée Johnston & Michelle Szabo (2011). Reflexivity and the Whole Foods Market Consumer: The Lived Experience of Shopping for Change. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 28 (3):303-319.score: 26.0
    There has been widespread academic and popular debate about the transformative potential of consumption choices, particularly food shopping. While popular food media is optimistic about “shopping for change,” food scholars are more critical, drawing attention to fetishist approaches to “local” or “organic,” and suggesting the need for reflexive engagement with food politics. We argue that reflexivity is central to understanding the potential and limitations of consumer-focused food politics, but argue that this concept is often relatively unspecified. The first objective (...)
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  32. G. R. Bassiry & Marc Jones (1993). Adam Smith and the Ethics of Contemporary Capitalism. Journal of Business Ethics 12 (8):621 - 627.score: 24.0
    This paper presents a theoretical elaboration of the ethical framework of classical capitalism as formulated by Adam Smith in reaction to the dominant mercantilism of his day. It is seen that Smith's project was profoundly ethical and designed to emancipate the consumer from a producer and state dominated economy. Over time, however, the various dysfunctions of a capitalist economy — e.g., concentration of wealth, market power — became manifest and the utilitarian ethical basis of the system eroded. Contemporary capitalism, (...)
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  33. Assya Pascalev (2003). You Are What You Eat: Genetically Modified Foods, Integrity, and Society. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (6):583-594.score: 24.0
    Thus far, the moral debateconcerning genetically modified foods (GMF) hasfocused on extrinsic consequentialist questionsabout the health effects, environmental impacts,and economic benefits of such foods. Thisextrinsic approach to the morality of GMF isdependent on unsubstantiated empirical claimsand fails to account for the intrinsic moralvalue of food and food choice and theirconnection to the agent's concept of the goodlife. I develop a set of objections to GMFgrounded in the concept of integrity andmaintain that food and food choice can beintimately connected to the (...)
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  34. Magdalena Öberseder, Bodo B. Schlegelmilch & Verena Gruber (2011). “Why Don't Consumers Care About CSR?”: A Qualitative Study Exploring the Role of CSR in Consumption Decisions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 104 (4):449-460.score: 24.0
    There is an unresolved paradox concerning the role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in consumer behavior. On the one hand, consumers demand more and more CSR information from corporations. On the other hand, research indicates a considerable gap between consumers’ apparent interest in CSR and the limited role of CSR in purchase behavior. This article attempts to shed light on this paradox by drawing on qualitative data from in-depth interviews. The findings show that the evaluation of CSR initiatives is (...)
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  35. Robert M. Veatch (2000). Doctor Does Not Know Best: Why in the New Century Physicians Must Stop Trying to Benefit Patients. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (6):701 – 721.score: 24.0
    While twentieth-century medical ethics has focused on the duty of physicians to benefit their patients, the next century will see that duty challenged in three ways. First, we will increasingly recognize that it is unrealistic to expect physicians to be able to determine what will benefit their patients. Either they limit their attention to medical well-being when total well-being is the proper end of the patient or they strive for total well-being, which takes them beyond their expertise. Even within the (...)
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  36. Nicholas P. Guehlstorf (2008). Understanding the Scope of Farmer Perceptions of Risk: Considering Farmer Opinions on the Use of Genetically Modified (Gm) Crops as a Stakeholder Voice in Policy. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (6):541-558.score: 24.0
    In the beginning, policy debates between critics and advocates of genetically modified (GM) crops focused on scientifically determined risks. Ten years later, the argument between environmentalists or consumers and regulators or industry has changed into a discussion about the implementation of more democratic policymaking about GM farming. A notable omission from the political debate about food biotechnology in the United States, however, is the opinion of farmers who cultivate the GM crops. Policymakers should value practical knowledge based on experiences from (...)
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  37. Joseph M. Grcic (1985). Democratic Capitalism: Developing a Conscience for the Corporation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 4 (2):145 - 150.score: 24.0
    One way of ensuring that individual actions do not violate a group's moral norms is to develop within each individual a conscience. Conscience consists in the internalization or acceptance of a group's moral norms as correct and overriding one's self-interest when they conflict.Corporations as well as individuals need a conscience to monitor and control their behavior. The correlative of a personal conscience in a corporation consists in the representation of group interests in the running and managing of the firm. (...)
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  38. Andrew Edgar (2013). The Dominance of Big Pharma: Power. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):295-304.score: 24.0
    The purpose of this paper is to provide a normative model for the assessment of the exercise of power by Big Pharma. By drawing on the work of Steven Lukes, it will be argued that while Big Pharma is overtly highly regulated, so that its power is indeed restricted in the interests of patients and the general public, the industry is still able to exercise what Lukes describes as a third dimension of power. This entails concealing the conflicts of (...)
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  39. Bernard J. Mansheim (1997). What Care Should Be Covered? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (4):331-336.score: 24.0
    : The answer to the question of what health care services should be covered by a managed care plan is straightforward; the plan should cover whatever the consumer is willing to pay for. From the plan's perspective, the consumer is the payer, that is, the employer who negotiates the plan; not the individual patient whose personal preferences and interests may be quite different. Since managed care organizations contract with payers to arrange for health care services within a (...)
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  40. Christine Parker, Carly Brunswick & Jane Kotey (2013). The Happy Hen on Your Supermarket Shelf. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):165-186.score: 24.0
    This paper investigates what “free-range” eggs are available for sale in supermarkets in Australia, what “free-range” means on product labelling, and what alternative “free-range” offers to cage production. The paper concludes that most of the “free-range” eggs currently available in supermarkets do not address animal welfare, environmental sustainability, and public health concerns but, rather, seek to drive down consumer expectations of what these issues mean by balancing them against commercial interests. This suits both supermarkets and egg producers because (...)
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  41. Jonathan Wolff, Dept of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    One important argument for the free market is that of the ‘invisible hand’ or ‘private vices, public virtues’. That is, individual profit-seeking behaviour by suppliers will lead to better quality, lower priced goods for consumers than could be achieved by other means. Where this is so the market may be to the benefit of all, including the worst off. However, reflection on a range of cases – including what is here called the Titanic Puzzle, introduced by Thomas Schelling - shows (...)
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  42. Douglas Kellner (1984). Critical Theory and the Culture Industries: A Reassesment. Telos 1984 (62):196-206.score: 24.0
    The theory of the culture indistry is central to critical theory and has had a major often unacknowledged impact on C. Wright Mills, Dwight Macdonald, George Gerbner, Alvin Gouldner, and others. Although the Institute didn't really develop the theory of the culture industries until after the emigration to the U.S., it can be traced back to Adorno's early 1930s writings on music, which stress the commodity character of popular music and its reifying effects. From the mid-1930s to the 1950s, there (...)
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  43. Lucy Costa, Jijian Voronka, Danielle Landry, Jenna Reid, Becky Mcfarlane, David Reville & Kathryn Church (2012). “Recovering Our Stories”: A Small Act of Resistance. Studies in Social Justice 6 (1):85-101.score: 24.0
    This paper describes a community event organized in response to the appropriation and overreliance on the psychiatric patient “personal story” within mental health organizations. The sharing of experiences through stories by individuals who self-identify as having “lived experience” has been central to the history of organizing for change in and outside of the psychiatric system. However, in the last decade, personal stories have increasingly been used by the psychiatric system to bolster research, education, and fundraising interests. We explore how (...)
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  44. James R. Wible (2008). The Economic Mind of Charles Sanders Peirce. Contemporary Pragmatism 5 (2):39-67.score: 24.0
    Charles Peirce had significant interests in economics. He reworked the mathematical economic models of Cournot and Jevons in the 1870s. He conceived of the transitive axiom of consumer preferences in 1874. Peirce also developed a thesis of the cognitive efficiency of the human mind, abduction. He criticized Newcomb's economic writings. These forays into economics affected the six essays on pragmatism. These interests in economics are integrated with the meaning of the pragmatic maxim in Peirce's 1903 Harvard Lectures.
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  45. Jean Baudrillard (2001). The Uncollected Baudrillard. Sage.score: 24.0
    Jean Baudrillard is generally recognized as one of the most important and provocative contemporary social theorists. But in the English speaking world, his reputation is largely based on books published after the 1960s, as he moved towards becoming the premier commentator on postmodernism. This wide ranging and expertly edited book examines the work of the young Baudrillard, it deepens our understanding of his seminal work on consumer culture by presenting his early essays on McLuhan, Lefebvre and Marcuse. The influence (...)
     
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  46. Don F. Hadwiger (1986). The Politics of Agricultural Abundance. Agriculture and Human Values 3 (4):99-107.score: 24.0
    Agriculture should be viewed not as an industry but rather as a set of sectors organized around region, commodity, and institution. As such, agriculture adjusts well to a situation of “abundance” (excess supplies of major commodities).Although these sector interests are often referred to as “special interests,” they have effectively used public policy to generate agricultural development, and will continue to have a developmental impulse. Sector interests will, therefore, resist most proposals based on macrosystem perspectives which would reduce (...)
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  47. C. Clare Hinrichs (1995). Off the Treadmill? Technology and Tourism in the North American Maple Syrup Industry. Agriculture and Human Values 12 (1):39-47.score: 24.0
    The contrast between the nostalgic pictures on maple syrup packaging and sophisticated technologies actually used in the sugarbush and sugarhouse suggests disjunctures between image and practice in the contemporary North American maple syrup industry. This paper argues that although evidence of a “technological treadmill” exists within the maple syrup industry, as it does in other rural production sectors, such a trend is incomplete due to the increasing importance of consumption-based activities and concerns in the countryside. In response to the (...) of tourists, second home owners and other increasingly influential non-producer groups, “traditional” maple enterprises persist, demonstrating a logic and appeal unaccounted for by treadmill theory. By addressing growing consumer concern about the appearance of the rural landscape, the health of the environment, and the quality of food, these “traditional” maple practices can provide distinct advantages for producers over technological modernization. The tension between technology use and tourism in the maple syrup industry offers insights about the role of small-scale specialty agriculture for sustainability in rural areas of advanced industrial countries undergoing social and economic change. (shrink)
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  48. I. Steedman (2004). Idolatry, Lost Icons and Consumer Preferences. Studies in Christian Ethics 17 (2):87-103.score: 24.0
    Advertising, with its effects on both individual wants and the general ethos of ‘consumerism’, is a matter of concern to both economists and spiritual commentators on the state of society: it thus falls well within Ronald Preston's range of interests. The article will consider both the economists’ approach to advertising and wider concerns about its influence in society, before posing a number of questions about the good and bad aspects of advertising and what, if anything, can and should be (...)
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  49. Jaywant Singh, Maria Mar Garcia los Salmones Sanchededelz & Igancio Rodriguez Bosqudele (2008). Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility and Product Perceptions in Consumer Markets: A Cross-Cultural Evaluation. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (3):597 - 611.score: 22.0
    The concept of corporate social responsibility is becoming integral to effective corporate brand management. This study adopts a multidimensional and cross-country perspective of the concept and analyses consumer perceptions of behaviour of four leading consumer products manufacturers. Data was collected from consumers in two countries – Spain and the UK. The study analyses consumers’ degree of interest in corporate responsibility and its impact on their perception about the company. The findings here suggest a weak impact of company-specific communication (...)
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  50. Uvonne Lau (2005). Is Banning Direct to Consumer Advertising of Prescription Medicine Justified Paternalism? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 2 (2):69-74.score: 22.0
    New Zealand is one of two OECD countries in the world where direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription medicine (DTCA-PM) is permitted. Increase in such activity in recent years has resulted in a disproportionate increase in dispensary volume of heavily advertised medicines. Concern for the potential harm to healthcare consumers and the public healthcare system has prompted the medical profession to call for a ban on DTCA-PM as the best way of protecting the public interest. Such blanket prohibition however also interferes (...)
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